Call for Contributions: Current Cites

This post is from Edward Junhao Lim., Editor of Current Cites.

Wanted: annotations for current awareness, monthly newsletter.

Hello everyone!

Current Cites is seeking annotations from library workers and students on information technology literature. The writing is relatively low commitment. You just need to write a short abstract or annotation. Our criteria are simple:

  • Only cite what you like.
  • Keep your annotation to one paragraph; say what needs to be said.
  • Use your voice, as well as the knowledge that you bring to the topic.
  • You are welcome to have hyperlinks within your annotation.

We want your take on it, especially on what, how, & why it matters to our profession. Submit as many annotations you’d like, whenever.

If you are interested in this unique writing opportunity, you can learn more about Current Cites by visiting our site www.currentcites.org. It has been published online at the end of every month in the last 30 years—and it's been freely available for just as long. We currently have 1,900+ subscribers on our distribution list.

Please submit your annotations via this webform: https://forms.gle/kxpKucjYnZELzrWW6.

I look forward to your contributions!

Cheers,

Edward Junhao Lim

Editor of Current Cites

To subscribe, e-mail to listserv@listserv.uc.edu with "subscribe currentcites" in the body.

edward.lim.jh@gmail.com

"When Does Burnout Begin? the Relationship between Graduate School Employment and Burnout Amongst Librarians"

Jade Geary and Brittany Hickey have published "When Does Burnout Begin? the Relationship between Graduate School Employment and Burnout Amongst Librarians" in In the Library with the Lead Pipe.

Here's an excerpt:

The purpose of this study was to identify the percentage of LIS workers (current and former) and students who have experienced burnout. Additionally, this study focused on the correlation between those who work while obtaining their LIS degree and whether or not they later experience burnout. These objectives aim to answer the question: what percentage of future librarians are more susceptible to burnout once they enter the profession because they are currently working while enrolled in classes?

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"WCAG 2.1 and the Current State of Web Accessibility in Libraries"

Carli Spina has published "WCAG 2.1 and the Current State of Web Accessibility in Libraries " in Weave.

Here's an excerpt:

Ensuring the accessibility of web content is key to ensuring that users with disabilities have equal access to online information and services. However, as a review of the literature demonstrates, even in the face of legal requirements, accessibility problems persist across the web, including in the online content created and shared by libraries. This article examines the new success criteria in the recently released WCAG 2.1, considers the opportunity they present for libraries to improve the user experience for users with a broad range of disabilities, and proposes steps to improve compliance with WCAG and online accessibility more broadly.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"’How Do I Do That?’ A Literature Review of Research Data Management Skill Gaps of Canadian Health Sciences Information Professionals"

Justin Fuhr has published "'How Do I Do That?' A Literature Review of Research Data Management Skill Gaps of Canadian Health Sciences Information Professionals" in the Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association.

Here's an excerpt:

There is a recognized need to provide research data management (RDM) services in health sciences libraries. A review of the literature reveals numerous strategies to provide training for health sciences librarians as they provide RDM services to health sciences researchers, faculty, and students. However, no consensus emerges through this literature review with respect to RDM training initiatives. With training initiatives being developed and documented, more in-depth research will emerge that verifies which initiatives have the greatest success for upskilling information professionals in managing research data. This is an area where future library and information studies research can be conducted. It is the hope that with this literature review, I can conduct my own survey to gain more perspective on RDM in a Canadian health sciences library context.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap