Archive for the 'E-Reserves' Category

Paywall Article: "On the Limitations of Recent Lawsuits against Sci?Hub, OMICS, ResearchGate, and Georgia State University&quot

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on August 13th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1002/leap.1254

Case Started on April 15, 2008: "The GSU E-reserves Case Lumbers On"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on April 24th, 2019

https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/copyright/article/79845-gsu-e-reserves-case-lumbers-on.html

"Academic Libraries as Unlikely Defendants: A Comparative Fair Use Analysis of the Georgia State University E-Reserves and HathiTrust Cases"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on February 6th, 2019

Laura Burtle and Mariann Burright have self-archived "Academic Libraries as Unlikely Defendants: A Comparative Fair Use Analysis of the Georgia State University E-Reserves and HathiTrust Cases."

Here's an excerpt:

Academic libraries rely on fair use for key functions in support of education. Among these functions are provision of electronic reserves, mass digitization, provision of access for print-disabled students, and preservation. These were the practices at issue in the 2008 Georgia State University e-reserves case and the 2012 HathiTrust case. This article explores the two lawsuits where libraries were sued for alleged copyright infringement. We explore how the courts in each case applied fair use to the facts of the case, compare and contrast the courts' analysis, and explain the role that transformative use plays in distinguishing the outcomes. Finally, the article applies lessons learned from the two cases to common library activities.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on August 5th, 2017

Andrew Albanese has published "For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

In the hearing, which went for just over an hour, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit in Atlanta, once again pressed attorneys for the fault lines in the decade-old copyright case, with much of the hearing focusing on whether Judge Orinda Evans correctly evaluated the fourth factor of the four factor fair use test (the effect on the market), and then properly weighted that factor in making her fair use determinations.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

EFF Submits Amicus Brief in Cambridge Press v. Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on February 20th, 2017

The EFF has submitted an Amicus Brief in the Cambridge Press v. Georgia State University case.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

On behalf of three national library associations, EFF today urged a federal appeals court for the second time to protect librarians' and students' rights to make fair use of excerpts from academic books and research.

Nearly a decade ago, three of the largest academic publishers in the world—backed by the Association of American Publishers (AAP) trade group—sued Georgia State University (GSU) for copyright infringement . . . GSU argued that posting excerpts in the e-reserve systems was a "fair use " of the material, thus not subject to licensing fees. GSU also changed its e-reserve policy to ensure its practices were consistent with a set of fair use best practices that were developed pursuant to a broad consensus among libraries and other stakeholders. . . .

But that was not enough to satisfy the publishers. Rather than declare victory, they've doggedly pursued their claims. It seems the publishers will not be content until universities and libraries agree to further decimate their budgets. As we explain in our brief, that outcome would undermine the fundamental purposes of copyright, not to mention both the public interest, and the interests of the authors of the works in question.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on August 30th, 2016

Andrew Albanese has published "Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

Following their second district court loss in eight years of litigation, the publisher plaintiffs in Cambridge University Press vs. Patton (known commonly as the GSU e-reserves case) have again appealed the case.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Steps toward a New GSU Ruling"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on April 28th, 2015

Kevin Smith has published "Steps toward a New GSU Ruling" in Scholarly Communication @ Duke University.

Here's an excerpt:

It appears that once again the publishers have failed in an effort to broaden the scope of the case beyond the item-by-item fair use analysis that has already been done and to possibly reintroduce some of the broad principles that they really want, which have so far been rejected at every stage. Now Judge Evans has explicitly told them, in her scheduling order, that what is required is "consideration and reevaluation of each of the individual claims" in order to redetermine "in each instance… whether defendants' use was a fair use under 17 U.S.C. section 107." Her schedule for the briefs is tight, with an end of the briefing now scheduled just two and a half months from now. Presumably we would still have a long wait while Judge Evans applies revised reasoning about fair use to each of the individual excerpts, but it looks a bit more like that is what is going to happen.

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"Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling"

Posted in Copyright, E-Reserves, Publishing on November 14th, 2014

Kevin L. Smith has published "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The word "incentive" appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

Fair-Use and E-Reserves: "A Reversal for Georgia State"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on October 20th, 2014

Kevin Smith has published "A Reversal for Georgia State" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

Here's an excerpt:

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals has issued its ruling in the publisher appeal of a district court decision that found most instances of electronic reserve copying at Georgia State to be fair use. The appellate court ruling is 129 pages long, and I will have much more to say after I read it carefully. But the hot news right now is that the Court of Appeals has reversed the District Court's judgment and remanded the case back for proceedings consistent with the new opinion. The injunction issued by the District Court and the order awarding costs and attorney's fees to GSU have been vacated.

Read more about it at "Publishers Win Reversal of Court Ruling That Favored 'E-Reserves' at Georgia State U." and "A Win for Publishers."

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

"Educational Fair Use Brief in Support of Georgia State University on Behalf of Amici Curiae Academic Authors and Legal Scholars"

Posted in Copyright, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on May 9th, 2013

David R. Hansen et al. have self-archived "Educational Fair Use Brief in Support of Georgia State University on Behalf of Amici Curiae Academic Authors and Legal Scholars" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

In this case, Plaintiff Publishers accuse GSU and its faculty of violating their copyrights through this practice. But, as the district court correctly found, such uses are fair, especially because they primarily use factual information to promote the purposes of education and teaching, the amount taken was reasonable in light of its purpose, and because Plaintiffs' evidence of a cognizable copyright market harm was speculative at best. However, the district court erred when it incorrectly concluded that these uses are not transformative. Using an unduly narrow definition of the concept, it failed to consider how educators repurpose scholarly works in productive ways that bring new meaning to and understanding of the works used.

As scholars and educators who produce and repurpose such works, amici urge this Court to affirm that these uses constitute a transformative use under the first fair use factor, and to reaffirm the findings under the other factors that these uses are fair. A finding of fair use in this case not only furthers the underlying goals of scholarship and education – access to knowledge – but also the very purposes of the Copyright Act itself.

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Library Copyright Alliance Files Brief in Georgia State University E-Reserves Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on April 29th, 2013

The Library Copyright Alliance has filed a brief in the Cambridge U. Press et al. v. Mark P. Becker et al. e-reserves copyright case that was prepared by the EFF and Jonathan Band.

Here's an excerpt from the EFF announcement:

In the amicus brief filed today, EFF urges the appeals court to see what the district court saw: the vast majority of uses at issue were protected fair uses. Moreover, as a practical matter, the licensing market the publishers say they want to create for e-reserves will never emerge—not least because libraries can't afford to participate in it. Even assuming that libraries could pay such fees, requiring this would thwart the purpose of copyright by undermining the overall market for scholarship. Given libraries' stagnant or shrinking budgets, any new spending for licenses must be reallocated from existing expenditures, and the most likely source of reallocated funds is the budget for collections. An excerpt license requirement thus will harm the market for new scholarly works, as the works assigned for student reading are likely to be more established pieces written by well-known academics. Libraries' total investment in scholarship will be the same but resources will be diverted away from new works to redundant payments for existing ones, in direct contradiction of copyright's purpose of "promot[ing] progress."

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

Surprise Brief by Justice Department in Georgia State University E-Reserves Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Libraries on February 4th, 2013

The Justice Department has filed a brief in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case by for a 21-day extension in which to "to file any amicus brief in support of appellants or in support of neither party."

Here's an excerpt from "Obama Administration Considers Joining Publishers in Fight to Stamp out Fair Use at Universities":

In digging into this, we've heard from a few sources that it's actually the US Copyright Office that has asked the DOJ to weigh in on the side of the publishers and against the interests of public universities and students.

Read more about it at "Publishers and Library Groups Spar in Appeal to Ruling on Electronic Course Reserves," "Unwelcome Intervention?," and "U.S. Attorneys May Weigh in On GSU E-Reserves Case."

| Google Books Bibliography (XHTML website; over 320 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

Publishers Appeal Georgia State E-reserves Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on September 11th, 2012

Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage Publications have filed an appeal in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case.

Here's an excerpt from the press release announcing the publishers' intent to appeal:

This case had the potential to mark a significant first step toward addressing the need for clarity around issues of copyright in the context of higher education, where current practices around fair use in a digital environment vary widely and could benefit from sound judicial guidance. Our hope was that the District Court would provide that guidance.

Instead, the Court's rulings, culminating in the August injunction decision, shift radically from long-accepted fair use principles and introduce, among other errors, unsustainable policies regarding the proportion of a work not readily available for digital licensing that can be digitally copied without restriction. We have no alternative but to appeal, to protect our authors' copyrights and advocate for a balanced and workable solution.

Read more about it at "Publishers Appeal Ruling in GSU E-Reserves Case."

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "SEP [Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography] is compiled with utter professionalism. It reminds me of the work of the best artisans who know not only every item that leaves their workshops, but each component used to create them—providing the ideal quality control." — Péter Jacsó ONLINE 27, no. 3 (2003): 73-76. | Digital Scholarship |

Publisher Plaintiffs Issue Statement on Order in Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on August 15th, 2012

The publisher plaintiffs have issued a statement on Judge Orinda Evans' order in the Georgia State University e-reserves copyright case.

Here's an excerpt:

The District Court's decision is marred by a number of serious legal errors. The fair use exception cannot be stretched beyond recognition simply because course materials are delivered in a digital format by an educational institution. The ruling excuses copyright violations by GSU and endorses unauthorized copying and distribution of academic works well beyond what the law allows and what universities across the country consider reasonable. The decision devalues academic scholarship by treating such work as 'factual' compilations. . . .

As with the initial decision to bring suit, the decision regarding an appeal will be based on a considered assessment that takes into account the extent to which this ruling, which we believe to be legally vulnerable on multiple grounds, endangers the creation and dissemination of high-quality academic work

Georgia State University has also issued a statement about the order.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog | Digital Scholarship |

Judge Issues Order in Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case: GSU’s Defense Costs to Be Paid by Plaintiffs

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Libraries on August 12th, 2012

Judge Orinda Evans has issued an order in the Georgia State University e-reserves copyright case that says, in part, that the defendants's attorney's fees and other defense costs will be paid by plaintiffs.

Here's an excerpt from the order:

In this litigation, the Court limited Plaintiffs to claims arising in three semesters in 2009 but did not require Plaintiffs to pursue all claims. When the trial began, Plaintiffs chose to pursue 99 claims out of 126. They then dropped 25 claims (and added one) during the trial. As to the remaining 75 claims, no prima facie case was proven in 26 instances. Digital permissions were unavailable in 33 instances. Neither digital nor hard copy permissions were available in 18 cases. Although the Court does not doubt Plaintiffs' good faith in bringing this suit, and there was no controlling authority governing fair use in a nonprofit educational setting, Plaintiffs' failure to narrow their individual infringement claims significantly increased the cost of defending the suit.

For these reasons, the Court exercises its discretion to award to Defendants their reasonable attorneys' fees. Other costs will also be taxed in favor of Defendants and against Plaintiffs to the extent permitted by statute.

Read more about it at "Judge Denies Publishers' Request for Relief in Georgia State U. E-Reserves Case" and "The Prevailing Party."

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Association of American Publishers Issues Statement on Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case Ruling

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on May 15th, 2012

The Association of American Publishers has issued a statement on the Georgia State University e-reserves copyright case ruling.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

At the same time, we are disappointed with aspects of the Court's decision. Most importantly, the Court failed to examine the copying activities at GSU in their full context. Many faculty members have provided students with electronic anthologies of copyrighted course materials which are not different in kind from copyrighted print materials. In addition, the Court's analysis of fair use principles was legally incorrect in some places and its application of those principles mistaken. As a result, instances of infringing activity were incorrectly held to constitute fair use. . . .

The Court's ruling has important implications for the ongoing vitality of academic publishing as well as the educational mission of colleges and universities. Contrary to the findings of the Court, if institutions such as GSU are allowed to offer substantial amounts of copyrighted content for free, publishers cannot sustain the creation of works of scholarship. The resources available to educators will be fundamentally impaired.

| E-science and Academic Libraries Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

"Issue Brief: GSU Fair Use Decision Recap and Implications"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on May 15th, 2012

ARL has released "Issue Brief: GSU Fair Use Decision Recap and Implications."

Here's an excerpt:

Although the decision is certainly not perfect (the use of bright line rules for appropriate amount under factor 3 is particularly troubling), Judge Evans has written a thorough and thoughtful analysis of the issues, and her opinion represents an overwhelming victory for Georgia State individually, a major defeat for the plaintiff publishers and for the AAP and CCC, and overall a positive development for libraries generally. The substance of the opinion is not ideal, but it is far more generous than the publishers have sought, it establishes a very comfortable safe harbor for fair use of books on e-reserve, and libraries remain free to take more progressive steps.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog | Digital Scholarship |

Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case Ruling (Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al.)

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on May 13th, 2012

The ruling is in for the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case.

Here's an excerpt from the ruling:

Of the 99 alleged infringements that Plaintiffs maintained at the start of trial, only 75 were submitted for post-trial findings of fact and conclusions of law. This Order concludes that the unlicensed use of five excerpts (of four different books) infringed Plaintiffs' copyrights. The question now is whether Georgia State's 2009 Copyright Policy caused those infringements. The Court finds that it did, in that the policy did not limit copying in those instances to decidedly small excerpts as required by this Order. Nor did it proscribe the use of multiple chapters from the same book. Also, the fair use policy did not provide sufficient guidance in determining the "actual or potential effect on the market or the value of the copyrighted work," a task which would likely be futile for prospective determinations (in advance of litigation). The only practical way to deal with factor four in advance likely is to assume that it strongly favors the plaintiff-publisher (if licensed digital excerpts are available).

Read more about it at "The GSU Decision—Not an Easy Road for Anyone" and “Inside the Georgia State Opinion.”

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "SEP [Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography] is compiled with utter professionalism. It reminds me of the work of the best artisans who know not only every item that leaves their workshops, but each component used to create them—providing the ideal quality control." — Péter Jacsó ONLINE 27, no. 3 (2003): 73-76. | Digital Scholarship |

"Copyright Policy and Practice in Electronic Reserves among ARL Libraries"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on December 1st, 2011

College & Research Libraries has released a preprint of "Copyright Policy and Practice in Electronic Reserves among ARL Libraries."

Here's an excerpt:

This paper presents the results of a survey of 110 ARL institutions regarding their copyright policies for providing electronic reserves. It compiles descriptive statistics on library practice as well as coding responses to reveal trends and shared practices. Finally, it presents conclusions about policy-making, decision-making and risk aversion in ARL institutions.

| Digital Scholarship's Digital Bibliographies | Digital Scholarship |

Georgia State University Motion for Directed Verdict Granted in Part in Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on June 13th, 2011

U.S. District Court Judge Orinda D. Evans granted Georgia State University's motion for directed verdict in part in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case. A directed verdict for the contributory infringement claim was granted.

Here's an excerpt from "Publishers Lose Another Claim as GSU Trial Comes to a Close" by Brandon Butler:

And just like that, Judge Orinda Evans threw out the second of the publishers' three claims. Now indirect infringement is the only remaining claim against GSU. . . .

This claim is the hardest one for GSU to avoid because, in theory, the publishers just have to find one infringement by one professor to prove GSU is an 'indirect infringer.'

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

Recent Commentary about the Georgia State E-Reserves Copyright Case (Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al.)

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on June 12th, 2011

Below is some recent commentary about the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case.

"A Nightmare Scenario for Higher Education" by Kevin Smith. Here's an excerpt:

First, if this injunction were adopted as proposed, it would enjoin everyone at Georgia State, including students, who would seem to largely lose their fair use rights by virtue of enrolling at GSU. It would apply to e-reserves, faculty web pages and any learning management systems in use or adopted in the future. It would make GSU responsible for every conceivable act of copying that took place on their campus. In short, administrators at Georgia State would have to look over the shoulders of each faculty member whenever they uploaded course material to an LMS or any other web page. . . .

Not only would GSU have to micromanage each faculty member’s choices about how to teach every class, they would also have to give the plaintiff publishers access to all of the computer systems on campus so that they too could examine each professor’s decisions.

"The Georgia State Filing—A Declaration of War on the Faculty?" by Paul Courant. Here's an excerpt:

Call me gullible, but even now I am not fully persuaded that academic publishers are the enemies of faculty and the university. However, I do think that something has gone horribly wrong when entities that were created to serve scholarship employ legal procedures that would hamstring scholars and students who engage in customary and effective behaviors in their teaching and learning. I hope that Judge Evans will recognize that the publishers’ proposal is a plain violation of copyright and would be destructive of vital public purposes.

"What's at Stake in the Georgia State Copyright Case." The Chronicle of Higher Education published comments from prominent experts in this article. Here's an excerpt from Dorothea Salo's contribution:

Should a ruling come down that adds so much complication, cost, or risk to provisions about electronic reserves that institutions and their libraries no longer feel safe offering them, faculty and librarians will unite at last in shared outrage on the far shore of the Rubicon.

"Georgia State, Copyright and the Future of Higher Education" by Tracy Mitrano. Here's an excerpt:

We need senior leadership in our institutions, guided by national associations, to pull that campus radical of the 1960's out of the suits and high heels we now don and get serious about a direction of change that preserves us.

"The Georgia State University Lawsuit Injunction: Back to the Future" by Peggy Hoon. Here's an excerpt:

However, this proposed injunction is so onerous, so intrusive, so far-reaching, and so incompatible with the reality of teaching and learning in the 21st century, that simply widely publicizing the existence of and contents of the proposed injunction may well achieve what the library community has been trying to do for the last twenty years.

**WAKE UP THE FACULTY AND MOBILIZE THEM TO RECLAIM CONTROL OF THEIR OWN WORKS OF AUTHORSHIP AND THEIR OWN SYSTEM OF SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION.**

This injunction is your fuel—now LIGHT that fire!

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |

E-Reserves and Copyright: Proposed Injunction in Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on May 15th, 2011

Cambridge University Press and other plaintiffs have submitted a proposed injunction in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case. The trial starts on 5/16/11.

Here's an excerpt:

II. Subject only to the provisions of Paragraph III hereof, GSU shall be and is permanently enjoined and restrained from creating, reproducing, transmitting, selling, or in any manner distributing, or assisting, participating in, soliciting, encouraging, or facilitating the creation, reproduction, download, display, sale, or distribution in any manner of, copies, whether in hard copy format, digital or electronic computer files, or any other format, of any and all Works without permission.

Read more about it at "A Nightmare Scenario for Higher Education" and "The Missing Preface or, How Publishers Are Misusing 20th Century Guidelines to End Fair Use at GSU."

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog |

E-Reserves and Copyright: Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. Trial Set for 5/16/2011

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on March 29th, 2011

The Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. trial date has been set for 5/16/2011.

Here's an excerpt from ruling:

At trial, the parties will need to present evidence and argument that will allow the Court to rule on the question whether Plaintiffs may proceed under Ex Parte Younp or whether the case must be dismissed for lack of subject matter jurisdiction. Based on the pleadings alone, the Court cannot say that it lacks subject matter jurisdiction to hear the case. Dismissal under Rules 12(b) (1) and 12(c), Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, would be improper.

Accordingly, Defendants' Motion to Dismiss (Doc. 2393) is DENIED WITHOUT PREJUDICE. The parties are DIRECTED to file a proposed consolidated pretrial order no later than April 29, 2011. The trial is set for May 16, 2011 at 10:00 a.m.

Read more about it at "Judge Sets Trial Date in Georgia State University E-Reserves Lawsuit ."

| Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

New Ruling in Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves on October 3rd, 2010

U.S. District Judge Orinda Evans has issued a ruling about the defendants' and plaintiffs' motions for summary judgment in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case.

Here's an excerpt:

Overall, the evidence presented does not indicate that Defendants "profited directly from" or "had a direct financial interest in" the infringement alleged by Plaintiffs. There is absolutely no evidence in the record showing that Georgia State benefitted financially from the alleged infringements. At most, if the Court takes the inferential steps suggested by Plaintiffs, any benefit the infringement provides to students constitutes "just an added benefit" rather than a clear "draw" to Georgia State. Therefore, the Court GRANTS Defendants' Motion for Summary Judgment as to the third claim, vicarious copyright infringement and DENIES Plaintiffs' Motion for Summary Judgment as to the third claim. . . .

The record before the Court on the motions for summary judgment does not speak to the question of whether in practice the Current Policy is encouraging improper application of the fair use defense. The Court therefore DENIES both Defendants' and Plaintiffs' motions for summary judgment as to the contributory infringement claim. . . .

Going forward, in order to show that Defendants are responsible for the copyright infringements alleged in this case, Plaintiffs must show that the 2009 Copyright Policy resulted in ongoing and continuous misuse of the fair use defense. To do so, Plaintiffs must put forth evidence of a sufficient number of instances of infringement of Plaintiffs' copyrights to show such ongoing and continuous misuse. Defendants will have the burden of showing that each specified instance of 2009 Copyright Policy infringement was a fair use. Both sides will be limited to the list of claimed infringements produced in response to the Court's August 11, 2010 and August 12, 2010 orders. The parties are DIRECTED to confer and determine whether further discovery is needed before resolving the remaining contributory infringement claim. Within twenty (20) days, the parties shall present a proposed scheduling order.

Read more about it at "Going Forward with Georgia State Lawsuit."

E-Reserves and Copyright: "Georgia State and (Un)Fair Use: A Rebuttal to Kenneth Crews"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on April 13th, 2010

Sanford G. Thatcher has published "Georgia State and (Un)Fair Use: A Rebuttal to Kenneth Crews" in Against the Grain. This paper examines an expert report by Crews in the important Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. e-reserves copyright case.


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