Archive for the 'Social Media' Category

"Open Access+ Service: Reframing Library Support to Take Research Outputs to Non-Academic Audiences"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Social Media on February 21st, 2020

http://doi.org/10.1629/uksg.499

"The Stability of Twitter Metrics: A Study on Unavailable Twitter Mentions of Scientific Publications"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media on January 23rd, 2020

https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.07491

"WordPress 5.3 Moves Closer to Valid HTML"

Posted in Social Media, Standards on October 16th, 2019

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/wordpress-5-3/330473/#close

"Flickr Adds Photo Printing as a Core Feature"

Posted in Publishing, Social Media on August 29th, 2019

https://petapixel.com/2019/08/28/flickr-adds-photo-printing-as-a-core-feature/

Paywall Article: "Scientific Authors in a Changing World of Scholarly Communication: What Does the Future Hold?"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Serials Crisis, Social Media on August 20th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2019.07.028

Paywall Article: "The Ownership and Control of Online Photos and Game Data: Patterns, Trends, and Keeping Pace with Evolving Circumstances"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Social Media on August 14th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1109/JCDL.2019.00022

"Crowding the Library: How and Why Libraries Are Using Crowdsourcing to Engage the Public"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries, Social Media on July 16th, 2019

Sarah Severson and Jean-Sébastien Sauve have published "Crowding the Library: How and Why Libraries Are Using Crowdsourcing to Engage the Public" in Partnership.

Here's an excerpt:

This article is written from a Canadian University library perspective with the goal to help the reader engage with the current crowdsourcing landscape. This article’s contribution includes a literature review and a survey of popular projects and platforms; followed by a case study of a crowdsourcing pilot completed at the McGill Library. The article pulls these two threads of theory and practice together—with a discussion of some of the best practices learned through the literature and real-life experience, giving the reader practical tools to help a library evaluate if crowdsourcing is right for them, and how to get a desired project off the ground.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 10 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"New Paper: Why Section 230 Is Better Than The First Amendment"

Posted in Internet Regulation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Social Media on April 19th, 2019

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20190411/09024441979/new-paper-why-section-230-is-better-than-first-amendment.shtml

"Countries Want to Ban ‘Weaponized’ Social Media. What Would That Look Like?"

Posted in Internet Regulation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Social Media on April 1st, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/31/world/australia/countries-controlling-social-media.html

"Myspace, Once the King of Social Networks, Lost Years of Data From Its Heyday"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Social Media on March 21st, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/19/business/myspace-user-data.html

"Towards Open Annotation: Examples and Experiments"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Social Media on March 1st, 2019

Lindsey Seatter has published "Towards Open Annotation: Examples and Experiments" in KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies.

Here's an excerpt:

This article interrogates how digital text annotation tools and projects facilitate online engagement and virtual communities of practice. With the rise of the Web 2.0 movement and the proliferation of digital resources, annotation has evolved from an isolated practice to a collaborative one. This article unpacks the impact of this shift by providing an in-depth discussion of five web-based tools and two social reading projects. This article examines issues of design, usability, and applicability to pedagogical intervention as well as underscores how productive group dynamics can be fostered through digital, social annotation.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Paywall Article: "Social Media Presence of Scholarly Journals"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media on December 4th, 2018

https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24124

Paywall Article: "Anatomy of Scholarly Information Behavior Patterns in the Wake of Academic Social Media Platforms"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Self-Archiving, Social Media on November 6th, 2018

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00799-018-0255-9

"Did France Just Make It Effectively Impossible to Use Twitter?"

Posted in Internet Regulation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Social Media on October 2nd, 2018

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20180930/22364640754/did-france-just-make-it-effectively-impossible-to-use-twitter.shtml

Pew Research Center: "Internet, Social Media Use And Device Ownership in U.S. Have Plateaued After Years of Growth"

Posted in Digital Culture, Social Media on September 28th, 2018

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/09/28/internet-social-media-use-and-device-ownership-in-u-s-have-plateaued-after-years-of-growth/

NYPL: "Insta Novels: Bringing Classic Literature to Instagram Stories"

Posted in Digital Culture, Publishing, Research Libraries, Social Media on August 23rd, 2018

https://www.nypl.org/blog/2018/08/22/instanovels?utm_campaign=instanovels

"Here’s Why Your Third Party Twitter Client Broke Today"

Posted in Social Media on August 17th, 2018

https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/heres-why-your-third-party-twitter-client-broke-today/

"Changing Styles of Informal Academic Communication in the Age of the Web: Orthodox, Moderate and Heterodox Responses"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Social Media on August 3rd, 2018

David Ellis et al. have self-archived "Changing Styles of Informal Academic Communication in the Age of the Web: Orthodox, Moderate and Heterodox Responses."

Here's an excerpt:

Purpose—The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study to investigate changes in scholarly communication practices among a group of scholars in the UK and build upon the results that were published in a previous paper. Design/methodology/approach—The study deployed a naturalistic inquiry approach using semi-structured interviews as a qualitative research tool. A sample of 40 participants from four UK universities were interviewed to explore the changes in informal scholarly communication behaviour. Findings—The analysis of the interviews revealed that there are three ideal types of behaviour: the 'Orthodox' uses formal and traditional scholarly communication approaches; the 'Moderate' prioritises formal communication approaches, but at the same time is trying to get benefits from informal channels; and, the 'Heterodox' uses all channels available in scholarly communication.

Academic Library as Scholarly Publisher Bibliography | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Early-Career Researchers Herald Change"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Social Media on July 26th, 2018

https://www.natureindex.com/news-blog/early-career-researchers-herald-change

License Change at Major Social Media Site for Photographers: "500px Nukes 1M+ Creative Commons Photos"

Posted in Copyright, Social Media on July 2nd, 2018

Michael Zhang has published "500px Nukes 1M+ Creative Commons Photos" in PetaPixel.

Here's an excerpt:

But overnight, all of the CC photos that have been uploaded since 2012 have been nuked from 500px. Users can no longer choose a CC license during uploading, search for CC photos, or download them.

Jason Scott reports on Twitter that the photos have been archived in the Internet Archives' Wayback Machine:

3 terabytes of Creative Commons photos going into the Wayback machine thanks to the efforts of dozens of volunteers slamming from NO warning and going for 48 hours straight. Amazing work, everyone. It's going to take a while to understand exactly what we got.

Note that the Wayback Machine is only searchable by site URL.

The Creative Commons photos have not been deleted; however, the Creative Commons license has been. Consequently, the user has no way to know about the existing Creative Commons licensing terms. On logon today, 500px gives the user the option of opting out of commercial distribution by Getty Images.

See also: "500px Photo Site Abandons Freely Shareable Images with Commercialization Push."

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"ScholarlyHub: A Progress Report at Six Months"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving, Social Media on June 25th, 2018

Guy Geltner and John Willinsky have self-archived "ScholarlyHub: A Progress Report at Six Months."

Here's an excerpt:

ScholarlyHub (SH) was launched in November 2017 as a portal to fund and create a social network for scholarship-using individuals and communities that is supported and directed from the bottom up and not beholden to venture capitalists on the one hand and governments on the other. As an inclusive, member-run portal, it hopes to connect rather than replace numerous non-profit and open-source OA initiatives, which tend to lack a visible and attractive front end, and which may not currently be interoperable. If its goals can be realized, SH may offer one solution to the full workflow platforms that for-profit conglomerates are on the cusp of achieving. This practitioner’s paper presents the key characteristics of SH and offers an early progress report.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Social Media Use Continues to Rise in Developing Countries but Plateaus Across Developed Ones

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers, Social Media on June 20th, 2018

The Pew Research Center has released Social Media Use Continues to Rise in Developing Countries but Plateaus Across Developed Ones.

Here's an excerpt:

Across the 39 countries, a median of 75% say they either use the internet occasionally or own a smartphone, our definition of internet use. In many advanced economies, nine-in-ten or more use the internet, led by South Korea (96%). . . .

Across 39 countries, a median of 53% say they use online social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter. However, that figure conceals large differences around the world, and the relationship between social media use and national wealth is not as strong as it is for overall internet use and smartphone ownership.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Academic Information on Twitter: A User Survey"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media on May 18th, 2018

Ehsan Mohammadi et al. have published "Academic Information on Twitter: A User Survey" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

Although counts of tweets citing academic papers are used as an informal indicator of interest, little is known about who tweets academic papers and who uses Twitter to find scholarly information. Without knowing this, it is difficult to draw useful conclusions from a publication being frequently tweeted. This study surveyed 1,912 users that have tweeted journal articles to ask about their scholarly-related Twitter uses. Almost half of the respondents (45%) did not work in academia, despite the sample probably being biased towards academics. Twitter was used most by people with a social science or humanities background. People tend to leverage social ties on Twitter to find information rather than searching for relevant tweets. Twitter is used in academia to acquire and share real-time information and to develop connections with others. Motivations for using Twitter vary by discipline, occupation, and employment sector, but not much by gender. These factors also influence the sharing of different types of academic information. This study provides evidence that Twitter plays a significant role in the discovery of scholarly information and cross-disciplinary knowledge spreading. Most importantly, the large numbers of non-academic users support the claims of those using tweet counts as evidence for the non-academic impacts of scholarly research.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 9 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Creepy or Not? Your Privacy Concerns Probably Reflect Your Politics"

Posted in Digital Culture, Privacy, Social Media on May 1st, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/30/technology/privacy-concerns-politics.html

"False Information on Web and Social Media: A Survey"

Posted in Digital Culture, Social Media on April 25th, 2018

https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.08559


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