Archive for the 'Scholarly Communication' Category

"University Copyright/Scholarly Communication Offices: Analysis of Their Services and Staff Profile"

Posted in Copyright, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on February 18th, 2020

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2020.102133

"Nature Will Publish Peer Review Reports as a Trial"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on February 10th, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00309-9

Canada to Have Life Plus 70 Copyright Term as a Result of USMCA Agreement: “Don’t Write Copyright Law in Secret”

Posted in Scholarly Communication on January 27th, 2020

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/01/dont-write-copyright-law-secret

"Grey Literature: Use, Creation, and Citation Habits of Faculty Researchers across Disciplines"

Posted in E-Prints, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Self-Archiving on December 20th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2314

Paywall Article: "From Information, to Data, to Knowledge—Digital Scholarship Centers: An Emerging Transdisciplinary Digital Knowledge and Research Methods Integrator in Academic and Research Libraries "

Posted in Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on December 12th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0340035219885145

Get Full Text Research: "Why are Librarians Concerned about GetFTR?"

Posted in Scholarly Communication on December 11th, 2019

https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2019/12/10/why-are-librarians-concerned-about-getftr/

"Does the Use of Open, Non-Anonymous Peer Review in Scholarly Publishing Introduce Bias? Evidence from the F1000 Post-Publication Open Peer Review Publishing Model"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on November 12th, 2019

https://arxiv.org/abs/1911.03379

Paywall Article: "The Effect of ‘Open Access’ on Journal Impact Factors: A Causal Analysis of Medical Journals"

Posted in Scholarly Communication on November 11th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physa.2019.122043

"First Large-Scale Survey on Grant Peer Review Published by Publons"

Posted in Grants, Scholarly Communication on October 11th, 2019

http://www.stm-publishing.com/first-large-scale-survey-on-grant-peer-review-published-by-publons/

"Revisiting ‘the 1990s Debutante’: Scholar-led Publishing and the Prehistory of the Open Access Movement"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on October 9th, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24306 and https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:24075

JMLA: "New Data Sharing Policy"

Posted in Scholarly Communication on October 8th, 2019

JMLA has released "New Data Sharing Policy."

Here's an excerpt:

Starting on October 1, 2019, authors of Original Investigation and Case Study articles will be required to (1) place the de-identified data associated with the manuscript in a repository and (2) include a Data Availability Statement in the manuscript describing where and how the data can be accessed.

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"Moving Peer Review Transparency from Process to Praxis"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on October 8th, 2019

Emily Ford has published "Moving Peer Review Transparency from Process to Praxis" in Insights.

Here's an excerpt:

Scholarly publications often work to provide transparency of peer-review processes, posting policy information to their websites as suggested by the Committee on Publication Ethics' (COPE) Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Publishing. Yet this falls short in providing peer-review transparency. Using examples from an interview-based qualitative study, this article argues that scholarly publications should move from peer-review process transparency to a praxis of transparency in peer review. Praxis infers that values inform practices. Scholarly publications should therefore use clear communication practices in all matters of business, and bolster transparency efforts, delineating rights and responsibilities of all players in peer review. Moreover, the scholarly publishing community should offer improved and society-led referee and editor training, rather than leaving the commercial publishing industry to fill the gap which results in peer review as a service to industry’s needs&emdash;turning an efficient profit&emdash;and not the scholarly community’s needs for human-to-human discourse.

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"Female Citation Impact Superiority 1996-2018 in Six out of Seven English-Speaking Nations"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on October 4th, 2019

https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.12919

Institutional Repository and Scholarly Communications Librarian at University of Alabama

Posted in Scholarly Communication on October 3rd, 2019

https://www.lib.ua.edu/about/employment/#/Institutional_Repository_and_Scholarly_Communications_Librarian

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"Which Are the Tools Available for Scholars? A Review of Assisting Software for Authors during Peer Reviewing Process"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on October 3rd, 2019

https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7030059

Paywall Article: Diffusion and Adoption of Research Data Management Services

Posted in Scholarly Communication on October 1st, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1108/GKMC-05-2019-0057

"Scientific Sinkhole: The Pernicious Price of Formatting"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on September 30th, 2019

Allana G. LeBlanc et al. have published "Scientific Sinkhole: The Pernicious Price of Formatting" in PLoS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyze the cost of manuscript formatting in scientific publishing. Our results suggest that scientific formatting represents a loss of 52 hours, costing the equivalent of US$1,908 per researcher per year. These results identify the hidden and pernicious price associated with scientific publishing and provide evidence to advocate for the elimination of strict formatting guidelines, at least prior to acceptance.

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"What’s in a Name? How False Author Affiliations Are Damaging Academic Research"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on September 27th, 2019

https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/09/26/whats-in-a-name-how-false-author-affiliations-are-damaging-academic-research/

"New CUP Journal ‘Takes Radical Approach’ to Research Publishing"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on September 20th, 2019

https://www.thebookseller.com/insight/new-cup-journal-take-radical-approach-publishing-research-1082591

Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Resources and Services at Georgetown University

Posted in Scholarly Communication on September 6th, 2019

Georgetown University is recruiting an Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Resources and Services.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The AUL provides leadership and direction for a division that includes the departments of Research Services, which is responsible for collection development, instruction, and research services; Copyright and Scholarly Communications; Library Assessment; the Bioethics Research Library; the School of Continuing Studies Library; and the Woodstock Theological Library. O

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"Journals Are Evolving into Information Platforms": "Rise of the Platforms"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on September 4th, 2019

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41567-019-0667-5

"The Limitations to Our Understanding of Peer Review"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on September 3rd, 2019

Jonathan Tennant and Tony Ross-Hellauer have self-archived "The Limitations to Our Understanding of Peer Review."

Here's an excerpt:

Peer review is embedded in the core of our scholarly knowledge generation systems, conferring legitimacy on research while distributing academic capital and prestige on individuals. Despite its critical importance, it curiously remains poorly understood in a number of dimensions. In order to address this, we have programmatically analysed peer review to assess where the major gaps in our theoretical and empirical understanding of it lie. We distill this into core themes around editorial accountability, the subjectivity and bias of reviewers, the function and quality of peer review, the role of the reviewer, the social and epistemic implications of peer review, and regarding innovations in open peer review platforms and services. We use this to present a guide for the future of peer review, and the development of a new research discipline based on the study of peer review. Such a field requires sustained funding and commitment from publishers and research funders, who both have a commitment to uphold the integrity of the published scholarly record. This will require the design of a consensus for a minimal set of standards for what constitutes peer review, and the development of a shared data infrastructure to support this. We recognise that many of the criticisms attributed to peer review might reflect wider issues within academia and wider society, and future care will be required in order to carefully demarcate and address these.

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"Open Up: A Survey on Open and Non-anonymized Peer Reviewing"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on August 29th, 2019

Lonni Besançon et al. have self-archived "Open Up: A Survey on Open and Non-anonymized Peer Reviewing."

Here's an excerpt:

We present a discussion and analysis regarding the benefits and limitations of open and non-anonymized peer review based on literature results and responses to a survey on the reviewing process of alt.chi, a more or less open-review track within the CHI conference, the predominant conference in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). This track currently is the only implementation of an open-peer-review process in the field of HCI while, with the recent increase in interest in open science practices, open review is now being considered and used in other fields. We collected 30 responses from alt.chi authors and reviewers and found that, while the benefits are quite clear and the system is generally well liked by alt.chi participants, they are reluctant to see it used in other venues. This concurs with a number of recent studies that suggest a divergence between support for a more open review process and its practical implementation.

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"Decentralising Scientific Publishing: Can the Blockchain Improve Science Communication?"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on August 27th, 2019

Flávio Codeço Coelho and Adeilton Brandão have published "Decentralising Scientific Publishing: Can the Blockchain Improve Science Communication?" in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz.

Here's an excerpt:

We present a decentralised solution for managing scientific communication, based on distributed ledger technologies, also called blockchains. The proposed system aims to solve incentive problems displayed by traditional systems in scientific communication and publication. A minimal working model is presented, defining roles, processes, and expected results from the novel system. The proposed solution is viable, given the current status of blockchain technology, and should lead to a rethinking of current practices and their consequences for scientific communication.

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"Growth in Data and Questions on Quality are Increasing Researcher Workload, Finds New Study From Elsevier and Sense about Science"

Posted in Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on August 26th, 2019

https://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/corporate/growth-in-data-and-questions-on-quality-are-increasing-researcher-workload-finds-new-study-from-elsevier-and-sense-about-science


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