Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Liberating the Publications of a Distinguished Scholar: A Pilot Project"

Posted in Copyright, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on June 20th, 2014

Julie Kelly has published "Liberating the Publications of a Distinguished Scholar: A Pilot Project" in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

Many distinguished scholars published the primary corpus of their work before the advent of online journals, which makes it more challenging to access. Upon being approached by a distinguished Emeritus Professor seeking advice about getting his work posted online, librarians at the University of Minnesota worked to gain copyright permissions to scan and upload older works to the University's Digital Conservancy (UDC). This project then uniquely took the process one step further, using the sharing option of RefWorks to make these works accessible to the widest possible audience while concurrently offering the sophisticated functionality of a citation manager. With open access repositories gaining acceptance as an authoritative long-term venue for making resources available online, including older content that can be digitized, the methods developed in this pilot project could easily be followed by others, thus greatly increasing access to older literature from distinguished scholars.

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    "The Dark Side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: The Case of Latin-American Repositories"

    Posted in Google and Other Search Engines, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on June 19th, 2014

    Enrique Orduña-Malea et al. have self-archived "The Dark Side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: The Case of Latin-American Repositories."

    Here's an excerpt:

    The main objective of this study is to ascertain the presence and visibility of Latin American repositories in Google and Google Scholar through the application of page count and visibility indicators. For a sample of 137 repositories, the results indicate that the indexing ratio is low in Google, and virtually nonexistent in Google Scholar; they also indicate a complete lack of correspondence between the repository records and the data produced by these two search tools. These results are mainly attributable to limitations arising from the use of description schemas that are incompatible with Google Scholar (repository design) and the reliability of web indicators (search engines). We conclude that neither Google nor Google Scholar accurately represent the actual size of open access content published by Latin American repositories; this may indicate a non-indexed, hidden side to open access, which could be limiting the dissemination and consumption of open access scholarly literature.

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      "Research Data Sharing: Developing a Stakeholder-Driven Model for Journal Policies"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 5th, 2014

      Paul Sturges et al. have self-archived "Research Data Sharing: Developing a Stakeholder-Driven Model for Journal Policies."

      Here's an excerpt:

      The Journal Research Data (JoRD) Project was a JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) funded feasibility study on the possible shape of a central service on journal research data policies. The objectives of the study included, amongst other considerations: to identify the current state of journal data sharing policies and to investigate the views and practices of stakeholders to data sharing. The project confirmed that a large percentage of journals do not have a policy on data sharing, and that there are inconsistencies between the traceable journal data sharing policies. Such a state leaves authors unsure of whether they should deposit data relating to articles and where and how to share that data. In the absence of a consolidated infrastructure for the easy sharing of data, a journal data sharing model policy was developed. The model policy was developed from comparing the quantitative information gathered from analysing existing journal data policies with qualitative data collected from the stakeholders concerned. This article summarises the information gathered, outlines the process by which the model was developed and presents the model journal data sharing policy in full.

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        "PLOS Data Policy: Catalyst for a Better Research Process"

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 3rd, 2014

        Emma Ganley has published "PLOS Data Policy: Catalyst for a Better Research Process" in College & Research Libraries News.

        Here's an excerpt:

        PLOS is seeking to ensure the ongoing utility of research, as making a paper openly accessible is enhanced enormously if that paper is linked seamlessly to the data from which it was constructed. In a time when post-publication peer review is more prevalent and data frequently come under intense public scrutiny, with whistle-blowers, blogs, and websites dedicated to investigating the validity and veracity of scientific publications, requiring access to the relevant data leads to a more rigorous scientific record.

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          Learned Society Attitudes towards Open Access: Report on Survey Results

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2014

          EDP Open has released Learned Society Attitudes towards Open Access: Report on Survey Results.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Key findings include:

          • Learned societies overwhelmingly agree that Open Access will inevitably place some learned societies' journals into financial jeopardy.
          • Competing with large Open Access specialist publishers was also considered a significant challenge for learned societies.
          • Gold Open Access is the Open Access method that is least offered by learned society journals, however nearly two-thirds of learned societies indicated that they would like to be offering this option.
          • More than ever before, with so many journals being published Open Access of dubious origin, learned societies should look to endorse content with a stamp of quality and authority.
          • Collaboration between learned societies could help in the transition to Open Access, by pooling resources and sharing complex tasks.
          • Two-thirds of all learned societies are also looking for support on best approach to OA, and compliance with funder mandates.

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            Open Access: Markup of Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology Act Reduces Embargo Period

            Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing on May 26th, 2014

            The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology has marked up the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act (FIRST Act), significantly reducing the embargo period for making works open access.

            Here's an excerpt from "FIRST Act Amended to Make Open Access Provision Actually Pretty Good":

            Calling this [Section 303 in the prior version of the bill] a "public access" section is a charitable reading: it extended embargo periods to up to three years, it allowed for simple linking to articles rather than the creation of an archive, and it delayed implementation unnecessarily long. (We've ranted about this bill time and again.)

            But a glimmer of hope appeared at yesterday's markup. Reps. Jim Sensenbrenner and Zoe Lofgren, introduced an amendment that radically changed Section 303. The new amendment [pdf] maps closely onto Sensenbrenner's Public Access to Public Science Act (H.R. 3157). It sets the embargo period at 12 months (like the NIH's current policy), though it allows stakeholders to extend this by 6 months if they can show a "substantial and unique harm." The amendment was also designed to facilitate long-term preservation, broad analysis of works, and closer investigation of broad copyright licenses. The current version is not perfect, but it is much improved—huge kudos to Sensenbrenner and Lofgren for standing up for open access.

            Read more about it at "Revised FIRST Bill Would Give Science Agencies 1 Year to Make Papers Free."

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              Canadian Researchers’ Publishing Attitudes and Behaviours

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on May 16th, 2014

              Canadian Science Publishing has released Canadian Researchers' Publishing Attitudes and Behaviours.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              Some key findings described in the report:

              • Researchers agree with principle, not cost, of open access (OA)
              • Almost half of the researchers reported publishing more than half of their research in open access format in past 2 years, yet availability of open access was 8 times less important than impact factor and 13 times less important than journal reputation when selecting a journal
              • For those who have published OA, institutions and tri-agency funding typically cover cost, yet many researchers indicated they did not know whether Canada's major funding bodies support OA
              • Peer review, reach, and discoverability are considered most important journal features
              • Use of repositories differs widely across disciplines
              • Laboratory/institutional blogs or websites and social media are increasingly being used for research dissemination

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                "The Embargoes Don’t Work: The British Academy Provides the Best Evidence Yet"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on May 15th, 2014

                Cameron Neylon has "The Embargoes Don't Work: The British Academy Provides the Best Evidence Yet" in PLOS Opens.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Embargoes are an artificial monopoly created to make the competition a bit less fierce. But truly, if a publisher believes that they add value and wants to be competitive then why should they fear a Word doc sitting on the web? Indeed if they do it suggests a lack of confidence in the additional value that they offer in the version of record. The best way to give yourself that confidence is to be tough on yourself and take a good look at how and where you add value. And the best way to do that is to compete successfully with "free."

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