Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"New University Presses in the UK: Accessing a Mission"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on October 17th, 2016

Andrew Lockett and Lara Speicher have published "New University Presses in the UK: Accessing a Mission" in Learned Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

In the space of just a year, five new university presses were launched in the UK. Although very different in size and stages of development, all but one were launched first and foremost as open access presses, based in or supported by their university's library. Why should there have been such a significant flurry of activity in such a short space of time, and what can the stated objectives and activities of these presses tell us about the current UK scholarly publishing environment? To answer some of those questions, this article looks back to the original mission of the founding university presses, examines the policy and funding environments in which the new presses are operating, looks at overseas developments in recent years for comparison, and concludes with a review of the challenges these young presses face as well as the benefits all university presses, but particularly open access ones, can confer to their institutions.

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"Why Marriage Matters: A North American Perspective on Press/Library Partnerships"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on October 17th, 2016

Charles Watkinson has published "Why Marriage Matters: A North American Perspective on Press/Library Partnerships" in Learned Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

Key points

  • Around 30% of campus-based members of the Association of American University Presses now report to libraries, more than double the number 5 years ago.
  • Beyond reporting relationships, physical collocation and joint strategic planning characterize the most integrated press/library partnerships.
  • The main mutual advantages of deep press/library collaboration are economic efficiency, greater relevance to parent institutions, and an increased capacity to engage with the changing needs of authors in the digital age.
  • There is emerging interest in collaboration at scale among libraries and presses that may extend the impact of press/library collaboration beyond single institutions.

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Investigating OA Monograph Services: Final Report

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on October 14th, 2016

Jisc has released Investigating OA Monograph Services: Final Report.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Overall, the project 'Investigating OA monographs services' has produced some extremely valuable guides in areas where no information (specifically for OA monographs) existed and identified some very strong areas where collaboration and experimentation could simultaneously bring real value to OA monograph publishers and the authors and readers of monographs.

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"Undercounting File Downloads from Institutional Repositories"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Scholarly Metrics, Self-Archiving on October 13th, 2016

Patrick Obrien et al. have published "Undercounting File Downloads from Institutional Repositories" in the Journal of Library Administration.

Here's an excerpt:

A primary impact metric for institutional repositories (IR) is the number of file downloads, which are commonly measured through third-party Web analytics software. Google Analytics, a free service used by most academic libraries, relies on HTML page tagging to log visitor activity on Google's servers. However, Web aggregators such as Google Scholar link directly to high value content (usually PDF files), bypassing the HTML page and failing to register these direct access events. This article presents evidence of a study of four institutions demonstrating that the majority of IR activity is not counted by page tagging Web analytics software, and proposes a practical solution for significantly improving the reporting relevancy and accuracy of IR performance metrics using Google Analytics.

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"SCOAP3 Journals Double Downloads"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on October 12th, 2016

SCOAP3 has released "SCOAP3 Journals Double Downloads."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The four largest journals participating in SCOAP3, two published by Elsevier and two by SpringerNature in partnership with the Italian Physical Society (SIF), and the Italian Institute for Advanced Studies (SISSA) have now analysed their logs to understand the impact of SCOAP3.

Elsevier announced that downloads to their two journals, Physics Letters B and Nuclear Physics B have doubled since they became Open Access at the start of SCOAP3 in January 2014. This increase is remarkable as SCOAP3 covers the most recent 3,500 articles in the journals, while most of the historic content of over 77,000 articles, is available to subscribers.

SpringerNature announced that since January 2014 they have observed a doubling of downloads across their two learned-society journals participating in SCOAP3: European Physical Journal C and the Journal of High Energy Physics.

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"How Do Scientists Define Openness? Exploring the Relationship between Open Science Policies and Research Practice"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 11th, 2016

Nadine Levin et al. have published "How Do Scientists Define Openness? Exploring the Relationship between Open Science Policies and Research Practice " in the Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society

Here's an excerpt:

This article documents how biomedical researchers in the United Kingdom understand and enact the idea of "openness." . . . This study is based on 22 in-depth interviews with U.K. researchers in systems biology, synthetic biology, and bioinformatics, which were conducted between September 2013 and February 2014. Through an analysis of the interview transcripts, we identify seven core themes that characterize researchers' understanding of openness in science and nine factors that shape the practice of openness in research.

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"Q&A with CNI’s Clifford Lynch: Time to Re-think the Institutional Repository?"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 23rd, 2016

Richard Poynder has published "Q&A with CNI's Clifford Lynch: Time to Re-think the Institutional Repository?" in Open and Shut?.

Here's an excerpt:

Moreover, today we can see that the interoperability promised by OAI-PMH has not really materialised, few third-party service providers have emerged, and content duplication has not been avoided. And to the exasperation of green OA advocates, author self-archiving has remained a minority sport, with researchers reluctant to take on the task of depositing their papers in their institutional repository. Given this, some believe the IR now faces an existential threat.

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"Successful SCOAP3 Global Open Access initiative Continues for Three More Years"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 22nd, 2016

CERN has released "Successful SCOAP3 Global Open Access initiative Continues for Three More Years."

Here's an excerpt:

After three years of successful operation and growth, CERN1 announced today the continuation of the global SCOAP3 (link is external) Open Access initiative for at least three more years. SCOAP3, the Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics, is an innovative partnership of over 3 000 libraries, funding agencies and research organisations from 44 countries. It has made tens of thousands of scientific articles freely available to everyone, with neither cost nor barrier for any author worldwide.

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"CRL’s ‘Pivot’ to Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing on September 22nd, 2016

The Center for Research Libraries has released "CRL's 'Pivot' to Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

Therefore, as of January 1, 2017, all digital materials hosted on the web by CRL, that derive from source materials in the public domain or for which CRL has secured the requisite rights and permissions, will be available without restriction. . . .

  1. CRL has digitized and posted on the web more than twelve million pages of materials from its collections to date. . . .
  2. Because of potential copyright restrictions, only about 35% of the twelve million are now available in open access. . . .
  3. The amount of public domain content on CRL servers will grow within the next few years, as on-demand digitization continues and as CRL receives digital files produced through partnerships. CRL in-house production now digitizes nearly one million pages per year, and generates approximately 2.9 million digital pages of primary legal publications annually through its Global Resources Partnership in Law and Government.

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"What It Means to Be Green: Exploring Publishers’ Changing Approaches to Green Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 20th, 2016

Elizabeth Gadd and Denise Troll Covey have published "What It Means to Be Green: Exploring Publishers' Changing Approaches to Green Open Access" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

Here's an excerpt:

To test the theory that publishers are in reality discouraging open access as defined at Bethesda and preferred by authors, we took a look at the number of publishers meeting the criteria for RoMEO Green over time and the number meeting the criteria for a 'redefined green', namely, allowing immediate deposit of the post-print in an institutional repository. We found that whilst the percentage of RoMEO Green publishers had increased 8% over the 12 years, the percentage meeting the 'redefined green' criteria decreased by 35% (Figure 1).

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"What Kind of World Is STM Living In?

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on September 20th, 2016

The League of European Research Universities has released What Kind of World Is STM Living In.

Here's an excerpt:

4 September saw the International Association of STM publishers (STM) issue a response to the EC's proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market, which flies in the face of LERU's views contained in its own Press Release. Amongst other things, STM is calling for the extension of ancillary copyright to cover academic publishing, implying that they will take legal action if this does not happen. . . . Ancillary copyright in this case would extend copyright protection, not allowing academics and universities freely to link to/use the world of information on the Internet, placing publishers in control of the information environment. LERU rejects this as counter to academic freedom and to the EC's vison for Open Science.

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"Discriminating between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 19th, 2016

Bhakti Hansoti, Mark I. Langdorf, MD, and Linda S. Murphy have published "Discriminating between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee" in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health.

Here's an excerpt:

OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

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