Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

DOAJ Journal Analysis: "Intersections: The Third Half"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 3rd, 2014

Walt Crawford has published "Intersections: The Third Half" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Most of this essay (pp. 7-19) is the "Third Half" of the two-part Journals and "Journals" examination in the October/November and December 2014 issues-adding another 1,200-odd bio/med journals from DOAJ and looking at overall patterns. The essay also includes four briefer discussions related to DOAJ and gold OA journals.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    "A Living Open Book"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on December 2nd, 2014

    Peter Suber has published "A Living Open Book" in Ebooks in Education: Realising The Vision.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This is a case study of my short book, Open Access (Suber 2012a). The book is not "enhanced" in the way that a growing number of digital academic books are enhanced. It has no graphics, no multimedia, and no interactivity beyond links, and does not offer different layers or pathways for readers at different levels. From that point of the view the book is conventional and text-oriented. But it has two other enhancements worth highlighting. First, the full text is open access, which benefits authors and readers, and sometimes also publishers. Second, the book has a companion web site of open-access updates and supplements, which benefits all three groups.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "The Adoption of Open Access Funds among Canadian Academic Research Libraries, 2008-2012"

      Posted in Open Access, Research Libraries on December 1st, 2014

      Crystal Hampson has published "The Adoption of Open Access Funds among Canadian Academic Research Libraries, 2008-2012" in Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research.

      Here's an excerpt:

      To examine academic libraries' responses to OA publishing charges, this article explores the adoption of OA funds among Canadian academic research libraries from 2008 to 2012 by analyzing results from a series of previously published surveys. The findings are then examined in light of Everett Rogers' Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) to consider the question of whether or not OA funds are becoming a standard service in Canadian academic research institutions. Adoption in Canada is briefly compared to that in the United States and United Kingdom. The paper concludes that, as of 2012, OA funds were becoming common but were not a standard service in Canadian academic research libraries and that libraries were actively participating in the development of OA funding models.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future

        Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing on December 1st, 2014

        Martin Paul Eve has published Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future with Cambridge University Pres.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        I am extremely pleased to announce that my book, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future has today been published by Cambridge University Press. The book offers a background to open access and its specifics for the humanities disciplines, as well as setting out the economics and politics of the phenomenon. It also has a very fine preface by Peter Suber! You can download the book for absolutely free (under a CC BY-SA license) at the official website (click the green "open access" button). You can also buy an extremely good value paperback copy, with all my royalties going to Arthritis Research UK, from the usual suspects.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Adopts Open Access Policy

          Posted in Open Access on November 21st, 2014

          The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has adopted an open access policy.

          Here's an excerpt:

          As of January 1, 2015 our Open Access policy will be effective for all new agreements. During a two-year transition period, publishers will be permitted to apply up to a 12 month embargo period on the accessibility of the publication and its underlying data sets. This embargo period will no longer be allowed after January 1, 2017.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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            "Bringing The DOAJ to a New Level"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 18th, 2014

            Lars Bjørnshauge has published "Bringing The DOAJ to a New Level" in ScieCom info.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Most promising projects do not make the transition to a service, much effort and many great ideas are lost. DOAJ has managed this transition since years, but now we are coming closer to the moment of truth. Whether what had turned out to be a social, organizational and managerial experiment: a community funded, crowdsourced free service, really can meet the expectations from increasingly demanding stakeholders.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History"

              Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

              James Shulman has published "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History" in LIBER Quarterly.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Hilary Ballon and Mariet Westermann, writing about the struggles of publishing in art history noted that "It is a paradox of the digital revolution that it has never been easier to produce and circulate a reproductive image, and never harder to publish one." If publishing in general is in crisis because of the seismic re-ordering in a digital world, the field of art history is the extreme tail of the spectrum; rights holders are accustomed to licensing image content for limited edition print runs. Given this particularly challenging corner of the publishing work, a project initiated by the Metropolitan Museum offers some hope of a collaborative way forward. What sociological re-engineering enabled progress on this problem? It is possible that there are other lessons here too, that might throw at least streaks of light on other process re-engineering provoked by digital innovation in publishing?

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                Case Study of a Book Published under a Creative Commons License

                Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on November 12th, 2014

                Here's a brief case study of how one book under a Creative Commons license evolved and was accessed.

                In 2005, the Association of Research Libraries published my book, the Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. With ARL's agreement, I made an open access PDF available on Digital Scholarship.

                In 2006, I converted the book into an open access XHTML website and published the Open Access Bibliography Author Index and the Open Access Bibliography Title Index.

                In 2008, I worked with Open Access Directory staff to convert it to wiki format and publish it as the basis for the Bibliography of Open Access.

                In 2010, I published Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography as an open access PDF file, an open access XHTML website, and a low-cost paperback. All versions of the bibliography were under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License. This derivative work was an updated version of the Open Access Bibliography that was more narrowly focused on scholarly treatments of open access.

                Below are the Digital Scholarship use statistics for the two books as of October 31, 2014. In this analysis, only HTML files or PDF files are counted as "page views"; image files and other supporting website files are excluded. This analysis also excludes spider use.

                • Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: over 355,000 page views.
                • Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: over 152,000 page views.

                That's a total of over 507,000 page views. For the measured time period, about 7.9% of all file requests to Digital Scholarship failed. Consequently, I'll eliminate 7.9% of the above page views and estimate that there were over 466,000 successful page views. This tally does not include any access statistics from ARL or the OAD (nor does it include paperback sales).

                If the multi-file HTML versions of the books are eliminated from consideration, the two books still had a total of over 173,000 PDF requests (excluding spider requests), adjusted to an estimated 159,000 plus successful PDF requests.

                To put these use statistics in perspective, in 2005, Willis Regier (Director of the University of Illinois Press) estimated that the typical university press book sold between 400 to 800 copies.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                  "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014"

                  Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing on November 12th, 2014

                  ARL has released "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014."

                  Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                  On October 13-14, 2014, members of the SHARE community gathered in Crystal City, Virginia, for their first face-to-face meeting. Attendees included more than half the members of the SHARE working groups (communications, technical, repository, and workflow), as well as SHARE Notification Service prototype participants and other stakeholders. The two-day meeting was intended to showcase progress on the Notification Service; identify challenges and opportunities related to the Notification Service prototype; explore future SHARE projects; and delve into ways in which the higher education community can play a proactive role in the stewardship of research. The meeting was convened with the generous support of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

                  Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                    "Intersections: Journals and ‘Journals': Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 5th, 2014

                    Walt Crawford has published "Intersections: Journals and 'Journals': Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    If you've been reading various commentaries about Gold OA journals-including Part 1-you may be wondering where all those supposed no-fee Gold OA journals are. This piece helps to tell that story. Specifically, of 2,843 journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that have an English interface version, aren't from either OASPA members or Beall-list publishers, and are not about aspects of medicine or biology-and that actually published one or more articles between January 2011 and June 30, 2014-more than 78% do not charge fees of any sort, and those journals published 53% of the articles published by the whole group during that period. Those percentages grow to almost 92% and more than 81%, respectively, for 1,426 journals in the humanities and social sciences.

                    This article looks at the "DOAJ set" in depth, including new tables that show distribution of articles (and journals publishing articles during a year) on a year-by-year basis, including the percentage of free journals and articles from those journals for each year.

                    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                      "Focusing on Student Research In The Institutional Repository DigitalCommons@USU"

                      Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on November 5th, 2014

                      Danielle Barandiaran et al. have published "Focusing on Student Research In The Institutional Repository DigitalCommons@USU" in College & Research Libraries News.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Student research is a significant and rapidly growing component of the institutional repository (IR) at Utah State University (USU). A briefing paper prepared for Open Access Scholarly Information Sourcebook (OASIS) points to student works as one of nine purposes for an IR.1 It is not uncommon to find undergraduate and graduate theses and dissertations in IRs. In 2013, an analysis of 283 U.S. repositories using the bepress or DSpsace platforms indicated 71% include this type of student research. However, other student research such as posters, presentations, or papers were only found in 38% of these repositories. Utah State University's IR actively solicits student research resulting from research groups and individuals, as well as posters and creative works featured in the university's Student Showcase symposium.

                      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                        "Harvard’s 11 Announcements for Open Access Week 2014"

                        Posted in Open Access on October 27th, 2014

                        Peter Suber has released "Harvard's 11 Announcements for Open Access Week 2014."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Harvard has taken a series of new steps to support open access to research. The best evidence lies in the 11 announcements released by the Office for Scholarly Communication for Open Access Week 2014 (October 20-24). Here's a brief recap of the series. . . .

                        The Berkman Center for Internet & Society announced that the Center's faculty directors and staff have adopted an open-access policy. In a landmark unanimous vote, the Berkman Center became the first research center at Harvard to adopt an open-access policy, and the first to extend the scope of Harvard's open-access policies beyond the faculty.

                        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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