Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

Swedish Research Council Adopts Open Access Mandate

Posted in Open Access on October 7th, 2009

The Swedish Research Council has adopted an open access mandate. The Swedish Research Council is "a government agency that provides funding for basic research of the highest scientific quality in all disciplinary domains. Besides research funding, the agency works with strategy, analysis, and research communication."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement (translation from the Swedish by Ingegerd Rabow):

The Swedish Research Council requires free access to research results.

In order to receive research grants the Research council requires now that researchers publish their material freely accessible to all.. . .

Researchers are required to guarantee that everything published shall be freely available according to Open Access not later than six months after publication.

The Council's decision regarding Open Access has been taken in close cooperation with SUHF, the Association of Swedish Higher Education. To promote free dissemination of research results is not and isolated Swedish occurrence, The so called Berlin Declaration aiming to implement Open Access has been signed by several large, mainly European research funders.

The Open Access-mandate covers so far only refereed journal articles and conference reports, not monographs and book chapters. The mandate will be included in the new grant conditions from 2010.

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    University of Illinois' IDEALS Repository Tops One Million Downloads

    Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on October 7th, 2009

    The University of Illinois' IDEALS institutional repository has topped one million downloads.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The Illinois Digital Environment for Access to Learning and Scholarship (IDEALS), a digital repository for research and scholarship developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has surpassed its one-millionth download.

    The service, offered through the University Library and Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services (CITES), is sponsored by the Office of the Provost at Illinois and was launched in 2006. The campus institutional repository includes articles, working papers, preprints, technical reports, conference papers and, data sets in various digital formats provided by University faculty, staff, and graduate students. Although central to the University of Illinois, anyone can access and benefit from IDEALS collections and services. "Today, over 12,000 items have been uploaded into IDEALS," said Sarah Shreeves, associate professor and IDEALS coordinator. "The success of this service has surpassed what anyone envisioned two and a half years ago, and we hope that others in the Illinois community will take advantage of its services."

    The mission of IDEALS is to preserve and provide persistent and reliable access to digital research and scholarship in order to give these works the greatest possible recognition and distribution. IDEALS endeavors to ensure that its materials appear in search engines such as Google, Google Scholar, and Bing and that the majority of the research is openly available for anyone to access. As a result of its efforts to disseminate research produced at the University of Illinois, IDEALS was recently ranked in the top 10 of institutional repositories worldwide. "I am delighted with the exposure that IDEALS has provided us with. Whenever we place a thesis or a report, the downloads start and never stop. We get many comments back from readers and researchers who have seen our work only on IDEALS," said Amr Elnashai, head, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    IDEALS contains a wealth of diverse information, from a Mid-America Earthquake Center report on the Kashmir Earthquake of 2005 to the Ethnography of the University Initiative’s publications and presentations, including campus folklore and cultural perceptions. "I appreciate that my thesis is archived in a stable location for reliable long-term access. The document is now freely available to anyone in the world, yet I retain the copyright," said David P. Hruska, an Illinois graduate. "Furthermore, my thesis is now displayed in search results returned by Google Scholar, improving the dissemination of my research."

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      University of Maryland: "What's the Opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory?: Lessons Learned from an Open Access Defeat"

      Posted in Open Access on October 5th, 2009

      In "What's the Opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory?: Lessons Learned from an Open Access Defeat," Tim Hackman examines the defeat of an open access resolution at the University of Maryland.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The "Faculty Voice"; article on open access published in March 2009 had been the first of its kind at UM, and discussion and drafting of the resolution had taken place mostly behind closed doors within the Faculty Affairs Committee, without involving the rest of the Senate. A handful of interested departments (almost all of them in the sciences) had met with representatives from the libraries to discuss scholarly communication and open access, but the majority of faculty members had no direct contact with someone who could explain the issue and its importance and answer specific questions. It was hoped that the faculty newsletter article would help in this regard, but it was a case of too little too late. The lesson then is don't assume faculty understand the situation or sympathize with the library's point of view.

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        Peter Suber on "Ten Challenges for Open-Access Journals"

        Posted in E-Journals, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 4th, 2009

        Peter Suber has published "Ten Challenges for Open-Access Journals" in the latest issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter.

        Here's an excerpt:

        I start with three disparities:  the gap between journal performance and what prevailing metrics say about journal performance (#1); the gap between the vision of OA embodied in the Budapest, Bethesda, and Berlin statements and the access policies at 85% of OA journals (#2); and the gap between a journal's quality and its prestige, even when the quality is high (#3).  Then I move on to seven kinds of doubt:  doubts about quality (#4), preservation (#5), honesty (#6), publication fees (#7), sustainability (#8), redirection (#9), and strategy (#10).

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          Walt Crawford on Open Access

          Posted in Open Access on October 4th, 2009

          Walt Crawford has dedicated an entire 34-page issue of Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large to a "Library Access to Scholarship" article on open access.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          A year’s worth of source material and commentary, organized into:
          Mandates, Policies and Compacts
          The Colors of OA
          Numbers
          Scandal!
          Framing and Mysteries
          The Problem(s) with Green OA
          Quality, Value and Progress
          Miscellany
          Conclusion

          Chances are, this is the last hurrah for Library Access to Scholarship and my semi-active independent commentary on open access.

          Let's hope that Walt changes his mind about discontinuing "Library Access to Scholarship," which has always been interesting, thought-provoking, and informative reading.

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            Publishing and the Ecology of European Research Project Releases PEER Annual Report—Year 1

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on October 1st, 2009

            The Publishing and the Ecology of European Research project has released PEER Annual Report—Year 1.

            Here's an excerpt:

            PEER (Publishing and the Ecology of European Research), supported by the EC eContentplus programme, is investigating the effects of the large-scale, systematic depositing of authors' final peer reviewed manuscripts (so called Green Open Access or stage-two research output) on reader access, author visibility, and journal viability, as well as on the broader ecology of European research.

            Peer-reviewed journals play a key role in scholarly communication and are essential for scientific progress and European competitiveness. The publishing and research communities share the view that increased access to the results of EU-funded research is necessary to maximise their use and impact. However, they hold different views on whether mandated deposit in open access repositories will achieve greater use and impact. There are also differences of opinion as to the most appropriate embargo periods. No consensus has been reached on a way forward so far.

            The lack of consensus on these key issues stems from a lack of clear evidence of what impact the broad and systematic archiving of research outputs in open access repositories might be, but PEER aims to change this through building a substantial body of evidence, via the development of an "observatory" to monitor the effects of systematic archiving over time.

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              Greater Western Library Alliance Members Send Letter Supporting Federal Research Public Access Act of 2009 to Senators

              Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on October 1st, 2009

              Greater Western Library Alliance member universities have sent a letter supporting the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2009 to members of the U.S. Senate.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Timely, barrier-free access to the results of federally funded research supports the core mission of our academic institutions and is essential to fully utilize our collective investment in science. FRPAA will help us maximize this investment by increasing the sharing research results, advancing the pace of discovery, and applying this knowledge for the benefit of our communities.

              The FRPAA bill also expands on the success of the public access policy of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the first U.S. agency to require public access to taxpayer-funded research. More than 450,000 unique users access material from the NIH repository each day. Under S.1373, we envision researchers and students working in fields of equal importance—from climate change to renewable energy—having the same access to federally funded research to advance their critical work.

              This bill is a crucial step in realizing this goal and we look forward to working with you to secure the bill’s passage.

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                "Worldwide Use and Impact of the NASA Astrophysics Data System Digital Library"

                Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Scholarly Metrics on September 29th, 2009

                Michael J. Kurtz et al. have self-archived "Worldwide Use and Impact of the NASA Astrophysics Data System Digital Library" in arXiv.org.

                Here's the abstract:

                By combining data from the text, citation, and reference databases with data from the ADS readership logs we have been able to create Second Order Bibliometric Operators, a customizable class of collaborative filters which permits substantially improved accuracy in literature queries. Using the ADS usage logs along with membership statistics from the International Astronomical Union and data on the population and gross domestic product (GDP) we develop an accurate model for world-wide basic research where the number of scientists in a country is proportional to the GDP of that country, and the amount of basic research done by a country is proportional to the number of scientists in that country times that country's per capita GDP.

                We introduce the concept of utility time to measure the impact of the ADS/URANIA and the electronic astronomical library on astronomical research. We find that in 2002 it amounted to the equivalent of 736 FTE researchers, or $250 Million, or the astronomical research done in France. Subject headings: digital libraries; bibliometrics; sociology of science; information retrieval

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