Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 3rd, 2015

Vincent Larivière et al. have published "The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

The consolidation of the scientific publishing industry has been the topic of much debate within and outside the scientific community, especially in relation to major publishers' high profit margins. However, the share of scientific output published in the journals of these major publishers, as well as its evolution over time and across various disciplines, has not yet been analyzed. This paper provides such analysis, based on 45 million documents indexed in the Web of Science over the period 1973-2013. It shows that in both natural and medical sciences (NMS) and social sciences and humanities (SSH), Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, and Taylor & Francis increased their share of the published output, especially since the advent of the digital era (mid-1990s). Combined, the top five most prolific publishers account for more than 50% of all papers published in 2013. Disciplines of the social sciences have the highest level of concentration (70% of papers from the top five publishers), while the humanities have remained relatively independent (20% from top five publishers). NMS disciplines are in between, mainly because of the strength of their scientific societies, such as the ACS in chemistry or APS in physics. The paper also examines the migration of journals between small and big publishing houses and explores the effect of publisher change on citation impact. It concludes with a discussion on the economics of scholarly publishing.

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    "The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2015

    Adelia Grabowsky has published "The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management" in Virginia Libraries.

    Here's an excerpt:

    This article examines if and how the integration of OA materials has changed collection and/or access management activities within academic libraries.

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      Digital Video Recordings from the 2015 Conference: Creating and Supporting Sustainable Publishing Programs

      Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2015

      The Library Publishing Coalition has released digital video recordings from the 2015 Conference: Creating and Supporting Sustainable Publishing Programs.

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        DSpace@MIT Tops 3 Million Downloads

        Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on May 26th, 2015

        MIT's DSpace@MIT repository has had over 3 million downloads as of the end of April.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        The Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT now contains over 16,600 articles, which collectively were downloaded over 90,000 times in April.

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          "The OA Landscape in Summary Form: Act Now!"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 22nd, 2015

          Walt Crawford has published "The OA Landscape in Summary Form: Act Now!" in Walt at Random.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The full set of 29 subject discussions that extend this summer's Library Technology Report issue "The State of Open Access Journals: Idealism and Opportunism" has been posted, and will appear on Fridays from now through September 11, 2015. (Oops: The actual title is Open Access Journals: Idealism and Opportunism.)

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            23 Groups Oppose Elsevier’s New Sharing and Hosting Policy

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 21st, 2015

            SPARC has released "New Policy from Elsevier Impedes Open Access and Sharing."

            Here's an excerpt:

            [Statement]

            On April 30, 2015, Elsevier announced a new sharing and hosting policy for Elsevier journal articles. This policy represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders' open access policies. In addition, the policy has been adopted without any evidence that immediate sharing of articles has a negative impact on publishers' subscriptions.

            Despite the claim by Elsevier that the policy advances sharing, it actually does the opposite. The policy imposes unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months for some journals. It also requires authors to apply a "non-commercial and no derivative works" license for each article deposited into a repository, greatly inhibiting the re-use value of these articles. Any delay in the open availability of research articles curtails scientific progress and places unnecessary constraints on delivering the benefits of research back to the public.

            Furthermore, the policy applies to "all articles previously published and those published in the future" making it even more punitive for both authors and institutions. This may also lead to articles that are currently available being suddenly embargoed and inaccessible to readers.

            As organizations committed to the principle that access to information advances discovery, accelerates innovation and improves education, we support the adoption of policies and practices that enable the immediate, barrier free access to and reuse of scholarly articles. This policy is in direct conflict with the global trend towards open access and serves only to dilute the benefits of openly sharing research results.

            We strongly urge Elsevier to reconsider this policy and we encourage other organizations and individuals to express their opinions.

            The statement is available here and we welcome others to show their support by also endorsing it.

            The statement has been signed by the following groups:

            COAR: Confederation of Open Access Repositories
            SPARC: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
            ACRL: Association of College and Research Libraries
            ALA: American Library Association
            ARL: Association of Research Libraries
            Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
            Australian Open Access Support Group
            IBICT: Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology
            CARL: Canadian Association of Research Libraries
            CLACSO: Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales
            COAPI: Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions
            Creative Commons
            Creative Commons (USA)
            EIFL
            Electronic Frontier Foundation
            Greater Western Library Alliance
            LIBER: European Research Library Association
            National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences
            OpenAIRE
            Open Data Hong Kong
            Research Libraries UK
            SANLiC: South African National Licensing Consortium
            University of St Andrews Library

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              University of Windsor Senate Adopts Open Access Policy

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 19th, 2015

              The University of Windsor Senate has adopted an open access policy.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              In recognition of the importance of providing open access to Windsor research, and building on the momentum of the Tri-Council Open Access Policy (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC), University Senate passed the University of Windsor's own open access policy (OA), Friday May 8. . . .

              In Canada, the recent release of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications requires grant recipients, as of May 2015, to take steps to ensure that peer-reviewed journal publications arising from supported research are made freely accessible within 12 months of publication.

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                University of Colorado Boulder Adopts Open Access Policy

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 18th, 2015

                The University of Colorado Boulder has adopted an open access policy.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                "We are delighted that the Chancellor's Executive Committee has approved an Open Access policy for the campus that was endorsed by the Boulder Faculty Assembly, the Council of Deans, and the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor," said University of Colorado Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. "CU-Boulder proudly joins the ranks of other campuses in higher education that have created such policies in the interest of openly sharing their published intellectual assets."

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                  "Weighing Up Anonymity and Openness in Publication Peer Review"

                  Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 15th, 2015

                  Hilda Bastian has published "Weighing Up Anonymity and Openness in Publication Peer Review" in Absolutely Maybe.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  There are some consequences that flow inevitably from the choice of anonymity or naming, like workload for journals, or the ability for peer reviewer conflicts of interests unknown to editors to be revealed. I'll come back to that later. But first, what evidence do we have that masking the identities of authors and peer reviewers achieves what it is meant to? . . .

                  So I've taken a deep dive into this literature. I found 17 relevant comparative studies, 12 of which are controlled trials. The quality of these studies varies greatly, especially the ability to control for variables. Some are in hypothetical situations. But there are some very good, decent-sized trials.

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                    "The Open Access Interviews: John Willinsky"

                    Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2015

                    Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: John Willinsky" in Open and Shut?.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    I was fortunate enough to draw together a wonderful team, led by the Associate University Librarian Brian Owen and technical wonder Alec Smecher at Simon Fraser University Library, who, through the research and development funds we were able to raise, created open source systems for scholarly workflow management and publishing. Together, we created Open Journal Systems (OJS) beginning in 2002, to answer the question of what will it cost to put a journal online. . . .

                    Over the course of the next decade, the use of OJS has spread across the globe to the point where—with 8,000 journals actively using it in 2013—we now feel a considerable responsibility at PKP for ensuring that this system provides a high-quality editorial workflow and publishing environment, and all the more so with roughly half of those journals in the Global South.

                    So in terms of your question on what PKP has developed into, I would say that it has become primarily but not entirely an open source software development and community support project in a global scale.

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                      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council Unanimously Adopts Open Access Policy

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on May 8th, 2015

                      The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council has unanimously adopted an open access policy.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      Resolution 2015-9: On Endorsing a University Open Access Policy represented more than a year of work by a 35-member faculty Open Access Task Force. Chairs Todd Vision and Julie Kimbrough told the University Gazette that they worked diligently to craft a policy recommendation that could be applied differently according to the needs of various disciplines.

                      UNC-CH is the 51st university or university unit to have adopted an open access policies by a unanimous faculty vote.

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                        "When Is an Article Actually Published? An Analysis of Online Availability, Publication, and Indexation Dates"

                        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 7th, 2015

                        Stefanie Haustein et al. have self-archived "When Is an Article Actually Published? An Analysis of Online Availability, Publication, and Indexation Dates."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        With the acceleration of scholarly communication in the digital era, the publication year is no longer a sufficient level of time aggregation for bibliometric and social media indicators. Papers are increasingly cited before they have been officially published in a journal issue and mentioned on Twitter within days of online availability. In order to find a suitable proxy for the day of online publication allowing for the computation of more accurate benchmarks and fine-grained citation and social media event windows, various dates are compared for a set of 58,896 papers published by Nature Publishing Group, PLOS, Springer and Wiley-Blackwell in 2012. Dates include the online date provided by the publishers, the month of the journal issue, the Web of Science indexing date, the date of the first tweet mentioning the paper as well as the Altmetric.com publication and first-seen dates. Comparing these dates, the analysis reveals that large differences exist between publishers, leading to the conclusion that more transparency and standardization is needed in the reporting of publication dates. The date on which the fixed journal article (Version of Record) is first made available on the publisher's website is proposed as a consistent definition of the online date.

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