Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Cites & Insights 17: 2017

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 7th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Walt Crawford has published "Cites & Insights 17: 2017."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

If you care about gray OA–the gold OA journals that aren't in DOAJ–you should buy this volume, as it includes the first (Gray OA 2012-2016) and probably the last (Gray OA 2014-2017) comprehensive studies of these journals . . .

The volume also includes the subject supplement for GOAJ2; "The Art of the Beall"; "Gray OA Portraits" offering some notes on the "largest" gray OA publishers; economics and access; and a few non-OA essays as well.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Academic Journals with a Presence on Twitter Are More Widely Disseminated and Receive a Higher Number of Citations"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on December 7th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

José Luis Ortega has published "Academic Journals with a Presence on Twitter Are More Widely Disseminated and Receive a Higher Number of Citations" in LSE Impact of Social Science.

Here's an excerpt:

In conclusion, these results make clear that the institutional presence of research journals on Twitter is fundamental for the dissemination and visibility of their outputs. Journals should consider Twitter as an important instrument for broadening audiences and tracking the social media impact of their publications. Furthermore, these findings suggest the best strategy to promote academic journals on Twitter is to have an individual account devoted exclusively to disseminating the journal’s content.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Illegitimate Journals and How to Stop Them: An Interview with Kelly Cobey and Larissa Shamseer"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 6th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Alice Meadows has published "Illegitimate Journals and How to Stop Them: An Interview with Kelly Cobey and Larissa Shamseer" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Earlier this year, David Moher, Larissa Shamseer, Kelly Cobey, and colleagues caused a bit of a stir when they published an article in Nature showing that, contrary to some (many?) expectations, it’s not just authors from low-income countries who publish in so-called "predatory" journals. In fact, their analysis of nearly 2,000 biomedical articles from more than 200 predatory journals found that "more than half of the corresponding authors hailed from high- and upper-middle-income countries as defined by the World Bank."

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Monitoring the Transition to Open Access: December 2017

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on December 6th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Universities UK has released Monitoring the Transition to Open Access: December 2017.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The proportion of UK research which is available via open access is increasing at a considerable rate, with 37% of research outputs freely available to the world immediately at publication.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Open Access, Power, and Privilege: A Response to ‘What I Learned from Predatory Publishing’"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on December 5th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Shea Swauger has published "Open Access, Power, and Privilege: A Response to 'What I Learned from Predatory Publishing" in College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

In June 2017, Jeffrey Beall published an opinion piece in Biochemia Medica titled "What I Learned from Predatory Publishers."1 While there are several elements of this publication that I find inaccurate or problematic, I'm choosing four specific themes within his piece to critique. In the interest of full disclosure, I am Jeffrey Beall's direct supervisor at the University of Colorado-Denver’s Auraria Library and have been since I began working there in July 2015.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"No, Fair! Evolving Perspectives on Excessive Use in Research"

Posted in Copyright, Libraries, Licenses, Publishing, Research Libraries on November 30th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Angela Rathmel has published "No, Fair! Evolving Perspectives on Excessive Use in Research" in ACRLog.

Here's an excerpt:

Publishers take an even heavier hand when responding to excessive use breaches. Blocking the user's IP access, or sometimes an entire campus IP range, presumes malicious intent (which it almost never is). This response also exaggerates the stakes involved and misunderstands what is necessary to perform digital research. Strict reinterpretation of print use restrictions in the online environment denies advances in research technology, from basic citation management software to APIs used for text and data mining. It also ignores the very structure of the linked-data world we live in.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Academic Publishing, Internet Technology, and Disruptive Innovation"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on November 30th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Haven Allahar has published "Academic Publishing, Internet Technology, and Disruptive Innovation" in the Technology Innovation Management Review.

Here's an excerpt:

After 350 years of operation, the academic journal publishing industry is imbalanced and in flux as a result of the impacts of Internet technology, which has led, over the past 20 years, to the rise of open access publishing. The introduction of open access journals, in the opinion of many researchers, is considered to be a case of disruptive innovation that is revolutionizing the industry. This article analyzes the traditional journal publishing system, the recent open access models of journal publishing as an evolving phenomenon, the nature and extent of open access as a disruptive innovation, and the implications for key stakeholders. The major finding is that open access publishing has gained traction because technology has contributed to lower publication costs, easier access to research articles, and speedier publishing processes. However, the threat posed by open access has not significantly impacted traditional publishers because of strategies employed by the major publishers and slow adoption of open access by some researchers.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Fair Use for Nonfiction Authors

Posted in Copyright, Publishing on November 30th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Authors Alliance has released Fair Use for Nonfiction Authors.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The guide addresses three common situations faced by nonfiction authors in which fair use may apply: 1) criticizing, discussing, or commenting on copyrighted material; 2) using copyrighted material to support a point made in the author’s work; and 3) using copyrighted material for non-consumptive research. It also addresses the most frequently asked questions about fair use and clears up some common misconceptions about when it might apply.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Springer Nature Continues to Advance Sharing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 29th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Springer Nature has released "Springer Nature Continues to Advance Sharing."

Here's an excerpt:

Articles have been successfully shared by authors, subscribers and media outlets over 3.25 million times during the first year of SharedIt, Springer Nature’s free content sharing initiative.

SharedIt was launched in October 2016 and covers over 2,700 journals including all the Springer Nature-owned portfolio and over 1,000 co-owned and partner-owned journals.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"FTC Halts the Deceptive Practices of Academic Journal Publishers"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 28th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The FTC has released "FTC Halts the Deceptive Practices of Academic Journal Publishers."

Here's an excerpt:

A federal court has granted a preliminary injunction requested by the Federal Trade Commission, temporarily halting the deceptive practices of academic journal publishers charged by the agency with making false claims about their journals and academic conferences, and hiding their publishing fees, which were up to several thousand dollars.

The preliminary injunction against OMICS Group Inc., iMedPub LLC, Conference Series LLC, and their CEO, director, and owner, Srinubabu Gedela stems from a complaint the FTC filed last year that names Gedela and his three companies as defendants.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Is Small Beautiful? The Position of Independent Scholarly Publishers in an Environment of Rapid Industry Consolidation"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 21st, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Charlie Remy et al. have self-archived "Is Small Beautiful? The Position of Independent Scholarly Publishers in an Environment of Rapid Industry Consolidation."

Here's an excerpt:

The publishing industry continues to consolidate, with large multinational publishers acquiring journals and other content from academic societies and independent publishers. This panel provided candid insights into the challenges facing smaller publishers, including how/why they continue to exist in a business environment increasingly dominated by large companies. The discussion examined the advantages that smaller, independent publishers enjoy and addressed their adaptation strategies, business planning (including open versus paid access models), strategic partnerships, technical infrastructure, production procedures, relationships with libraries, and the work needed to meet the evolving needs of library end users. The impact of industry consolidation on libraries, including that of the intermediaries between publishers and libraries, was also discussed. The panel included speakers from humanities, social science, and science publishers who provided a range of perspectives from across the disciplines.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Green on What Side of the Fence? Librarian Perceptions of Accepted Author Manuscripts"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on November 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jimmy Ghaphery, Sam Byrd, and Hillary Miller have published "Green on What Side of the Fence? Librarian Perceptions of Accepted Author Manuscripts" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION There is a growing body of accepted author manuscripts (AAMs) in national, professional, and institutional repositories. This study seeks to explore librarian attitudes about AAMs and in what contexts they should be recommended. Particular attention is paid to differences between the attitudes of librarians whose primary job responsibilities are within the field of scholarly communications as opposed to the rest of the profession. METHODS An Internet survey was sent to nine different professional listservs, asking for voluntary anonymous participation. RESULTS This study finds that AAMs are considered an acceptable source by many librarians, with scholarly communications librarians more willing to recommend AAMs in higher-stakes contexts such as health care and dissertation research. DISCUSSION Librarian AAM attitudes are discussed, with suggestions for future research and implications for librarians.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Page 1 of 10712345...102030...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.