Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Bringing The DOAJ to a New Level"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 18th, 2014

Lars Bjørnshauge has published "Bringing The DOAJ to a New Level" in ScieCom info.

Here's an excerpt:

Most promising projects do not make the transition to a service, much effort and many great ideas are lost. DOAJ has managed this transition since years, but now we are coming closer to the moment of truth. Whether what had turned out to be a social, organizational and managerial experiment: a community funded, crowdsourced free service, really can meet the expectations from increasingly demanding stakeholders.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History"

    Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

    James Shulman has published "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History" in LIBER Quarterly.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Hilary Ballon and Mariet Westermann, writing about the struggles of publishing in art history noted that "It is a paradox of the digital revolution that it has never been easier to produce and circulate a reproductive image, and never harder to publish one." If publishing in general is in crisis because of the seismic re-ordering in a digital world, the field of art history is the extreme tail of the spectrum; rights holders are accustomed to licensing image content for limited edition print runs. Given this particularly challenging corner of the publishing work, a project initiated by the Metropolitan Museum offers some hope of a collaborative way forward. What sociological re-engineering enabled progress on this problem? It is possible that there are other lessons here too, that might throw at least streaks of light on other process re-engineering provoked by digital innovation in publishing?

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)"

      Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

      Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust, and Charles Oppenheim have published "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)" in D-Lib Magazine.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The ideas of textual or data mining (TDM) and subsequent analysis go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Originally carried out manually, textual and data analysis has long been a tool which has enabled new insights to be drawn from text corpora. However, for the potential benefits of TDM to be unlocked, a number of non-technological barriers need to be overcome. These include legal uncertainty resulting from complicated copyright, database rights and licensing, the fact that some publishers are not currently embracing the opportunities TDM offers the academic community, and a lack of awareness of TDM among many academics, alongside a skills gap.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling"

        Posted in Copyright, E-Reserves, Publishing on November 14th, 2014

        Kevin L. Smith has published "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling" in Library Journal.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The word "incentive" appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          Case Study of a Book Published under a Creative Commons License

          Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on November 12th, 2014

          Here's a brief case study of how one book under a Creative Commons license evolved and was accessed.

          In 2005, the Association of Research Libraries published my book, the Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. With ARL's agreement, I made an open access PDF available on Digital Scholarship.

          In 2006, I converted the book into an open access XHTML website and published the Open Access Bibliography Author Index and the Open Access Bibliography Title Index.

          In 2008, I worked with Open Access Directory staff to convert it to wiki format and publish it as the basis for the Bibliography of Open Access.

          In 2010, I published Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography as an open access PDF file, an open access XHTML website, and a low-cost paperback. All versions of the bibliography were under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License. This derivative work was an updated version of the Open Access Bibliography that was more narrowly focused on scholarly treatments of open access.

          Below are the Digital Scholarship use statistics for the two books as of October 31, 2014. In this analysis, only HTML files or PDF files are counted as "page views"; image files and other supporting website files are excluded. This analysis also excludes spider use.

          • Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: over 355,000 page views.
          • Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: over 152,000 page views.

          That's a total of over 507,000 page views. For the measured time period, about 7.9% of all file requests to Digital Scholarship failed. Consequently, I'll eliminate 7.9% of the above page views and estimate that there were over 466,000 successful page views. This tally does not include any access statistics from ARL or the OAD (nor does it include paperback sales).

          If the multi-file HTML versions of the books are eliminated from consideration, the two books still had a total of over 173,000 PDF requests (excluding spider requests), adjusted to an estimated 159,000 plus successful PDF requests.

          To put these use statistics in perspective, in 2005, Willis Regier (Director of the University of Illinois Press) estimated that the typical university press book sold between 400 to 800 copies.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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            "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014"

            Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing on November 12th, 2014

            ARL has released "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014."

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            On October 13-14, 2014, members of the SHARE community gathered in Crystal City, Virginia, for their first face-to-face meeting. Attendees included more than half the members of the SHARE working groups (communications, technical, repository, and workflow), as well as SHARE Notification Service prototype participants and other stakeholders. The two-day meeting was intended to showcase progress on the Notification Service; identify challenges and opportunities related to the Notification Service prototype; explore future SHARE projects; and delve into ways in which the higher education community can play a proactive role in the stewardship of research. The meeting was convened with the generous support of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites"

              Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on November 10th, 2014

              Andy Tattersall has published "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The debate on whether which is the best way forward for post-publication review will continue and like other topics such as measurement of research, there appears to be no 'silver bullet'. Instead there is a collection of sites and tools operating in silos, all offering to solve a problem, that being the lack of post publication discussion and assessment. Below are a list of some of the main tools and sites offering some kind of comment, discussion or review system—it is not exhaustive or comprehensive, but it will give you some idea as to what they are and do.

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                "The Effect of Discovery Systems on Online Journal Usage: A Longitudinal Study"

                Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on November 6th, 2014

                Michael Levine-Clark et al. have published The Effect of Discovery Systems on Online Journal Usage: A Longitudinal Study in Insights: The UKSG Journal.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Many academic libraries are implementing discovery services as a way of giving their users a single comprehensive search option for all library resources. These tools are designed to change the research experience, yet very few studies have investigated the impact of discovery service implementation. This study examines one aspect of that impact by asking whether usage of publisher-hosted journal content changes after implementation of a discovery tool. Libraries that have begun using the four major discovery services have seen an increase in usage of this content, suggesting that for this particular type of material, discovery services have a positive impact on use. Though all discovery services significantly increased usage relative to a no discovery service control group, some had a greater impact than others, and there was extensive variation in usage change among libraries using the same service. Future phases of this study will look at other types of content.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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