Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

SSRN Launches ChemRN (Chemistry Research Network)

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 8th, 2017

SSRN has launched ChemRN

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Chemistry researchers can share ideas and other early stage research, including posting preprints and working papers on ChemRN. Users can quickly upload and read papers for free, across all of Chemistry, including the fields of Energy, Environmental and Materials Sciences.

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"For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on August 5th, 2017

Andrew Albanese has published "For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

In the hearing, which went for just over an hour, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit in Atlanta, once again pressed attorneys for the fault lines in the decade-old copyright case, with much of the hearing focusing on whether Judge Orinda Evans correctly evaluated the fourth factor of the four factor fair use test (the effect on the market), and then properly weighted that factor in making her fair use determinations.

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"The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 4th, 2017

Heather Piwowar et al. have self-archived "The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

We estimate that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA (19M in total) and that this proportion is growing, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid. The most recent year analyzed (2015) also has the highest percentage of OA (45%). Because of this growth, and the fact that readers disproportionately access newer articles, we find that Unpaywall users encounter OA quite frequently: 47% of articles they view are OA. Notably, the most common mechanism for OA is not Gold, Green, or Hybrid OA, but rather an under-discussed category we dub Bronze: articles made free-to-read on the publisher website, without an explicit Open license.

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"Elsevier Acquires bepress"

Posted in Digital Repositories, E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 3rd, 2017

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Elsevier Acquires bepress" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Today, Elsevier announces its acquisition of bepress. In a move entirely consistent with its strategy to pivot beyond content licensing to preprints, analytics, workflow, and decision-support, Elsevier is now a major if not the foremost single player in the institutional repository landscape.

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"The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on August 2nd, 2017

Janneke Adema and Graham Stone have published "The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This article outlines the rise and development of New University Presses and Academic-Led Presses in the UK or publishing for the UK market. Based on the Jisc research project, Changing publishing ecologies: a landscape study of new university presses and academic-led publishing, commonalities between these two types of presses are identified to better assess their future needs and requirements. Based on this analysis, the article argues for the development of a publishing toolkit, for further research into the creation of a typology of presses and publishing initiatives, and for support with community building to help these initiatives grow and develop further, whilst promoting a more diverse publishing ecology.

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"Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature"

Posted in Copyright, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 25th, 2017

Daniel S Himmelstein et al. have published "Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature" in PeerJ.

Here's an excerpt:

Since its creation in 2011, Sci-Hub has grown rapidly in popularity. However, until now, the extent of Sci-Hub's coverage was unclear. As of March 2017, we find that Sci-Hub's database contains 68.9% of all 81.6 million scholarly articles, which rises to 85.2% for those published in closed access journals. Furthermore, Sci-Hub contains 77.0% of the 5.2 million articles published by inactive journals. Coverage varies by discipline, with 92.8% coverage of articles in chemistry journals compared to 76.3% for computer science. Coverage also varies by publisher, with the coverage of the largest publisher, Elsevier, at 97.3%.

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Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 24th, 2017

Jisc has released Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2016 we commissioned a research project focused on institutional publishing initiatives which includes academic-led publishing ventures (ALPs) as well as new university presses and library-led initiatives (NUPs). We are pleased to announce the publication of the report 'Changing Publishing Ecologies. A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-led Publishing', which charts the outcomes of this research. . . .

The NUP and ALP strands of the research study were co-ordinated and run in tandem by [Janneke] [Graham] Stone and Adema. This study was informed by a desk top review of current library publishing ventures in the US, Europe and Australia and an overview of international academic-led initiatives and their existing and future directions. The NUP strand consisted of a survey, which collected 43 responses, where the ALP strand was informed by interviews with 14 scholar-led presses. Taking different approaches for these two types of press, the report captures the take-up, reasoning and characteristics of these initiatives, as well as their future plans.

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"EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Google and Other Search Engines, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 21st, 2017

COMMUNIA has released "EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research."

Here's an excerpt:

Last week the Culture and Education Committee (CULT) and the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) voted on their final opinions on the Commission’s Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. . . .

The introduction of a new right for press publishers (aka the “link tax”) to extract fees from search engines for incorporating short snippets of—or even linking to—their content in article 11 is one of the most controversial issues of the proposed directive. Adopting this type of ancillary right at the EU level would have a strong negative impact on all stakeholders, including publishers, authors, journalists, researchers, online service providers, and readers. . . .

In the votes last week in the CULT and ITRE committees, the press publishers right was also carried through – and even expanded. Both of the recent opinions remove the restriction that the right applies to digital uses only, meaning that if adopted it would cover all uses—both digital and in print. Even worse, ITRE—the committee responsible for policy relating to the promotion of research—voted to extend the press publishers right to cover scientific publications.

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"Research Output Availability on Academic Social Networks: Implications for Stakeholders in Academic Publishing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on July 20th, 2017

Mikael Laakso, et al. have self-archived "Research Output Availability on Academic Social Networks: Implications for Stakeholders in Academic Publishing."

Here's an excerpt:

In an effort to map out factors related to ASN [Academic Social Networks] use this article provides a multi-method case study of one business school (Hanken School of Economics, Finland) that incorporates 1) a bibliometric analysis on the full-text availability of research output on ASNs for research published 2012–2014 by Hanken affiliated authors, 2) semi-structured interviews with faculty active in publishing in order to gain insight into motivations for use and use patterns, and 3) a survey distributed to all research-active faculty and doctoral students in order to gain a wider perspective on ASN use.

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"On Sponsorship, Transparency, Scholarly Publishing, and Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2017

Richard Poynder has published "On Sponsorship, Transparency, Scholarly Publishing, and Open Access" in Open & Shut?

Here's an excerpt:

Sponsorship and lobbying (which often amount to the same thing), for instance, have assisted legacy publishers to co-opt open access. This has seen the triumph of the pay-to-publish model, which has been introduced in a way that has enabled publishers to adapt OA to their needs, and to ringfence and port their excessive profits to the new OA environment. Those researchers who do not have the wherewithal to pay article-process charges (APCs), however, are finding themselves increasingly disenfranchised.

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"Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 18th, 2017

Martin Paul Eve has published "Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities" in the Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) has been shaping and benefiting the scientific community for years now, but this new wave of disseminating research freely has not quite taken hold in the field of humanities. Though humanities publishers could also benefit from an OA model, many have been resistant, citing possible issues with plagiarism or appropriation of an author's work for less than ideal uses. There are also challenges with the cost of publishing OA content, which for humanities could be much higher than in the scientific community due to the length of works produced.

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"E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on July 13th, 2017

Angela Conyers et al. have published "E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article summarizes how libraries and library consortia are acquiring and evaluating e-books, how usage statistics feature within library workflows, the issues faced in doing so and the resulting impact of these issues on understanding usage and informing purchasing of new titles. Discussions with publishers indicate how usage data are being used within the organization, the requirements of customers and the challenges involved in providing usage data for e-books. Assessing and evaluating e-book usage is a complex and challenging task with processes and workflows in development. A transition from print to e-books represents a significant change for libraries, and the availability of reliable usage statistics to support purchase decisions is vital.

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