Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Creative Commons: Challenges and Solutions for Researchers; A Publisher’s Perspective of Copyright in an Open Access Environment"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing on July 15th, 2013

Nicola Gulley has published "Creative Commons: Challenges and Solutions for Researchers; A Publisher's Perspective of Copyright in an Open Access Environment" in the latest issue of Insights: The UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Copyright in the digital environment is evolving at an unprecedented rate. Copyright exists to protect the rights of an owner of an original piece of work by imposing restrictions on re-use but it does not always fit well with how we use and share information in the digital sphere.

The growth of open access (OA) publishing has also added to the challenge as the right to reuse as well as read content has been emphasized.

Creative Commons (CC) licences were introduced to try and bridge the gaps between the barriers imposed by traditional copyright and the realities of the digital environment but, as they are general licences, it is not always clear how they apply to specific situations.

This article addresses some of the key questions around how the various licences can be applied in academic publishing, what some of the consequences are, and how they affect different research areas.

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    "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science"

    Posted in Libraries, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2013

    Peter Willett has published "The Characteristics of Journal Editorial Boards in Library and Information Science" in the latest issue of the International Journal of Knowledge Content Development & Technology.

    Here's an excerpt:

    A study of the members of the editorial boards of 16 leading LIS journals shows that the boards vary markedly in size, in diversity (in terms of both gender and nationality) and in the experience and publication/citation profiles (based on Web of Science data) of their board-members. A typical editorial board member will be male, work in the USA, have published their first LIS article in 1995, and have 9.5 publications and 39 non-self citations to those publications, with the publication/citation profiles differing significantly from those of non-board-member contributors to the 16 journals

    .

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      "Innovative Approaches to Publishing Open Access Monographs: It’s Not Business as Usual"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on July 12th, 2013

      the latest issue of Jisc Inform includes "Innovative Approaches to Publishing Open Access Monographs It's Not Business as Usual."

      Here's an excerpt:

      If open access policies start to include monographs (the Wellcome Trust in May 2013 expanded its open access policy to include funding for authors of monographs and book chapters), what business model will support a vibrant HSS research environment and the wide dissemination of knowledge, and at the same time be affordable and sustainable for all the parties involved, especially those without grant funding?

      There is little evidence on different open access models and so there is currently a period of experimentation. Let's look at the business models currently being explored.

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        "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers"

        Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2013

        Marisa L. Ramirez et al. have published "Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

        Here's an excerpt:

        An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfettered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts, and humanities journal editors' and university press directors' attitudes toward ETDs. The findings indicate that manuscripts that are revisions of openly accessible ETDs are always welcome for submission or considered on a case-by-case basis by 82.8 percent of journal editors and 53.7 percent of university press directors polled.

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          "How Institutionalized Are Model License Use Terms? An Analysis of E-Journal License Use Rights Clauses from 2000 to 2009"

          Posted in Electronic Resources, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2013

          Kristin R. Eschenfelder, Tien-I Tsai, Xiaohua Zhu and Brenton Stewart have published "How Institutionalized Are Model License Use Terms? An Analysis of E-Journal License Use Rights Clauses from 2000 to 2009" in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This paper explored the degree to which use terms proposed by model licenses have become institutionalized across different publishers' licenses. It examined model license use terms in four areas: downloading, scholarly sharing, interlibrary loan, and electronic reserves. Data collection and analysis involved content analysis of 224 electronic journal licenses spanning 2000-2009. Analysis examined how use terms changed over time, differences between consortia and site license use terms and differences between commercial and noncommercial publisher license use terms. Results suggest that some model license use terms have become institutionalized while others have not. Use terms with higher institutionalization included: allowing ILL, permitting secure e-transmission for ILL, allowing e-reserves with no special permissions, and not requiring deletion of e-reserves files. Scholarly sharing showed lower institutionalization with most publishers not including scholarly sharing allowances. Other use terms showing low institutionalization included: recommendations to avoid printing requirements related to ILL and recommendations to allow hyperlinks for e-reserves. The results provide insight into the range of use terms commonly employed in e-journal licenses.

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            Debating Open Access

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 10th, 2013

            The British Academy has released Debating Open Access.

            Here's an excerpt:

            We decided at an early stage when thinking about putting these papers together, in January 2013, that we needed to have as contributors people who thought open access was a good thing, the way forward; people who thought it was a good thing but fraught with practical problems which were ill-understood by some of its advocates; and people who thought it was a bad thing in principle. This is what we have indeed commissioned. We have not got the full spectrum of views about open access, for sure, which would have required very many more articles . . .There is also diversity in the contributors: academics and publishers, representatives of learned societies, natural and social scientists as well as historians and literary critics, although the important perspective of university librarians is one that is missing.

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              "Publishers and Universities Respond to the OSTP Mandate"

              Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 8th, 2013

              Denise Troll Covey has self-archived "Publishers and Universities Respond to the OSTP Mandate" in SelectedWorks.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Brief summary and comparison of the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) announced by the Association of American Publishers and the Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) announced by the American Association of Universities, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and Association of Research Libraries.

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                "Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record"

                Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Electronic Resources, Libraries, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on July 8th, 2013

                portal: Libraries and the Academy has released an e-print of "Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record" by Marlene Manoff.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Digital technology has irrevocably altered the nature of the archive. Drawing on materialist critiques and the evolving field of media archaeology, this essay explores new strategies for understanding the implications of computer networks in libraries. Although a significant portion of the contemporary literature within Library and Information Science (LIS) addresses issues of technological change, the materialist and multidisciplinary approaches proposed here provide a theoretical basis for investigating the current state of library technologies in new ways. These methods provide insight into the proliferation of digital products and the cycles of platform adoption and replacement that have marked the past decades of library development. They also help to reframe questions about content aggregation and the licensing of digital scholarship.

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                  "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals"

                  Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

                  Donald W. King and Carol Tenopir have published "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals" in the latest issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  The emphasis of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship of how purposes of reading scholarly journals (e.g., research, teaching, current awareness, etc.) lead to the information seeking patterns used by them (e.g., how they identify articles that are read, where they obtain them, etc.), which dictates certain aspects of use (e.g., how much is read, age of articles read, format of the articles, etc.), which is related to the positive outcomes or value of reading (e.g., increased productivity, improved research or teaching, saving readers' time or money, etc.), which serves as return components of the ROI of academic library journal collections.

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                    "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX"

                    Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

                    Sven Vlaeminck has published "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX" in the latest issue of LIBER Quarterly.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    In this paper we summarize the findings of an empirical study conducted by the EDaWaX-Project. 141 economics journals were examined regarding the quality and extent of data availability policies that should support replications of published empirical results in economics. This paper suggests criteria for such policies that aim to facilitate replications. These criteria were also used for analysing the data availability policies we found in our sample and to identify best practices for data policies of scholarly journals in economics. In addition, we also evaluated the journals' data archives and checked the percentage of articles associated with research data. To conclude, an appraisal as to how scientific libraries might support the linkage of publications to underlying research data in cooperation with researchers, editors, publishers and data centres is presented.

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                      "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships"

                      Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 18th, 2013

                      Vincent Lariviere, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Benoit Macaluso, Stasa Milojevic, Blaise Cronin, and Mike Thelwall have self-archived "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships" in arXiv.org.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers – both published and unpublished – have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers.

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                        "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher"

                        Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 17th, 2013

                        Digital Scholarship has released "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher" by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail and LISTSERVs, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal.

                        That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). Although PACS-L's greatest contribution may have been in raising librarians' awareness of the importance and potential of the then fledgling Internet, it was also the platform on which my initial scholarly digital publishing efforts were based.

                        In August 1989, I launched The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. Starting in 1994, ASCII articles were also distributed via a Gopher server. In 1995, a website was established, and articles were also distributed as HTML files.

                        I edited the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review through 1996. By the end of that year, there had been over 4.2 million requests for the journal's files.

                        In 1996, I established the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book that had 79 subsequent versions. It was initially published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats.

                        These early digital publishing projects were sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries, which maintains an archive of ASCII articles from The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (http://journals.tdl.org/pacsr/index.php/pacsr). The PACS-L archive was deleted in 2013 when the list shut down.

                        In 1995, I established Digital Scholarship (http://digital-scholarship.org/), and I began to publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. By 2013, Digital Scholarship was publishing PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

                        The last version of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography was published in 2011 (http://digital-scholarship.org/sepb/sepb.html). From 1996 through 2011, the e-book had over 11.9 million file requests.

                        From April 2005 through May 2013, Digital Scholarship had over 12.2 million visitors from 229 counties and over 58.7 million file requests.

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