Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Google and Publishers Settle Seven-Year-Old Copyright Lawsuit over Google Library Project

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on October 4th, 2012

Google and the Association of American Publishers have settled the copyright lawsuit over Google Library Project. The related Authors Guild lawsuit has not been settled.

Here's an excerpt from the Google press release:

The agreement settles a copyright infringement lawsuit filed against Google on October 19, 2005 by five AAP member publishers. As the settlement is between the parties to the litigation, the court is not required to approve its terms.

The settlement acknowledges the rights and interests of copyright-holders. US publishers can choose to make available or choose to remove their books and journals digitized by Google for its Library Project. Those deciding not to remove their works will have the option to receive a digital copy for their use.

Apart from the settlement, US publishers can continue to make individual agreements with Google for use of their other digitally-scanned works. . . .

Google Books allows users to browse up to 20% of books and then purchase digital versions through Google Play. Under the agreement, books scanned by Google in the Library Project can now be included by publishers.

See also the AAP press release.

| Google Books Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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    Open Access: SCOAP3 Launched

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 1st, 2012

    The SCOAP3 open access initiative has been launched at a meeting at CERN, and it will become operational in 2014.

    Here's an excerpt from the press release:

    In the SCOAP3 model, libraries and funding agencies pool resources currently used to subscribe to journal content and use them to support the peer-review system directly instead. Journal publishers then make their articles Open Access, which means that anyone can read them. Authors retain the copyright, and generous licenses for re-use are used.

    Publishers of 12 journals, accounting for the vast majority of articles in the field, have been identified for participation in SCOAP3 through an open and competitive process, and the SCOAP3 initiative looks forward to establishing more partnerships with key institutions in Europe, America and Asia as it moves through the technical steps of organizing the re-direction of funds from the current subscription model to a common internationally coordinated fund.

    | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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      "Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors’ Open Access Rights"

      Posted in Author Rights, Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 30th, 2012

      David R. Hansen has published "Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors' Open Access Rights" in the latest issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

      Here's an excerpt:

      METHODS To understand the scope of author-retained rights (including the right to purchase hybrid or other open access options) at some sample universities, author-rights data through the SHERPA/RoMEO API was combined with individual article citations (from Thomson Reuters' Web of Science) for works published over a one-year period (2011) and authored by individuals affiliated with five major U.S. research universities. RESULTS Authors retain significant rights in the articles that they create. Of the 29,322 unique articles authored over the one year period at the five universities, 28.83 percent could be archived in final PDF form and 87.95 percent could be archived as the post-print version. Nearly 43.47 percent also provided authors the choice of purchasing a hybrid paid open access option. DISCUSSION A significant percentage of current published output could be archived with little or no author intervention. With prior approval through an open access policy or otherwise, article manuscripts or final PDFs can be obtained and archived by library staff, and hybrid paid-OA options could be negotiated and exploited by library administrators.

      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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        Important Changes for Users and Participants of the Open Access Tracking Project

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on September 16th, 2012

        The Open Access Tracking Project is migrating to TagTeam.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) is moving to TagTeam.

        If you previously subscribed to OATP feeds as a reader, or helped build OATP feeds as a tagger, this page explains how to continue with the TagTeam version of the project. If you haven't previously participated in OATP, this page explains how to get started.

        • As a reader, you should stop subscribing to the Connotea versions of the OATP feeds and start subscribing to the TagTeam versions. Starting September 17, 2012, only the TagTeam versions will be comprehensive.
        • As a tagger, you may continue to tag at Connotea if you wish. But you are now free to tag for OATP from other tagging platforms as well. Either way, you'll have to tell TagTeam to follow your OATP tagging activity.

        | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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          Budapest Open Access Initiative Issues Recommendations for Next Ten Years of Open Access Development

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 12th, 2012

          The Budapest Open Access Initiative has issued recommendations for the next ten years of open access development.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Ten years ago the Budapest Open Access Initiative launched a worldwide campaign for open access (OA) to all new peer-reviewed research. It didn't invent the idea of OA. On the contrary, it deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might "work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success." But the BOAI was the first initiative to use the term "open access" for this purpose, the first to articulate a public definition, the first to propose complementary strategies for realizing OA, the first to generalize the call for OA to all disciplines and countries, and the first to be accompanied by significant funding. . . .

          The problems that previously held up the adoption and implementation of OA are solved, and the solutions are spreading. But until OA spreads further, the problems for which OA is a solution will remain largely unsolved. In this statement, we reaffirm the ends and means of the original BOAI, and recommit ourselves to make progress. But in addition, we specifically set the new goal that within the next ten years, OA will become the default method for distributing new peer-reviewed research in every field and country.

          | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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            Publishers Appeal Georgia State E-reserves Case

            Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on September 11th, 2012

            Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage Publications have filed an appeal in the Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al. case.

            Here's an excerpt from the press release announcing the publishers' intent to appeal:

            This case had the potential to mark a significant first step toward addressing the need for clarity around issues of copyright in the context of higher education, where current practices around fair use in a digital environment vary widely and could benefit from sound judicial guidance. Our hope was that the District Court would provide that guidance.

            Instead, the Court's rulings, culminating in the August injunction decision, shift radically from long-accepted fair use principles and introduce, among other errors, unsustainable policies regarding the proportion of a work not readily available for digital licensing that can be digitally copied without restriction. We have no alternative but to appeal, to protect our authors' copyrights and advocate for a balanced and workable solution.

            Read more about it at "Publishers Appeal Ruling in GSU E-Reserves Case."

            | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010: "SEP [Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography] is compiled with utter professionalism. It reminds me of the work of the best artisans who know not only every item that leaves their workshops, but each component used to create them—providing the ideal quality control." — Péter Jacsó ONLINE 27, no. 3 (2003): 73-76. | Digital Scholarship |

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              UK Government Allocates £10 Million to Support Open Access

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on September 9th, 2012

              The UK Government has allocated £10 million to support open access in UK research universities.

              Here's an excerpt from the press release:

              The investment will enable a number of research-intensive UK institutions to kick-start the process of developing policies and setting up funds to meet the costs of article processing charges (APCs). This is in line with the recommendations of the Finch report on open access, published in June. . . .

              The investment will be made to 30 institutions receiving funding through Research Councils and UK higher education funding councils. It is in addition to the contribution RCUK will be making to institutions to support payment of APCs associated with open access through block funding grants from 1 April 2013 onwards. More details of this will be announced in the autumn.

              The UK Funding Councils will launch a consultation this autumn on implementing a requirement that research outputs submitted to any future Research Excellence Framework (REF) should be as widely accessible as possible.

              | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                Researcher Attitudes and Behaviour Towards the ‘Openness’ of Research Outputs in Agriculture and Related Fields

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 6th, 2012

                Coherence in Information for Agricultural Research for Development has released Researcher Attitudes and Behaviour Towards the 'Openness' of Research Outputs in Agriculture and Related Fields.

                Here's an excerpt:

                An online worldwide survey of researchers in agriculture and related fields was carried out in March 2011 by the CGIAR, FAO and GFAR on behalf of the CIARD (Coherence in Information for Agricultural Research for Development) initiative. The aim of the survey was to gain greater understanding of researcher behaviours and attitudes in relation to communicating research outputs and making such outputs open and accessible. There were almost 1500 responses to the survey, with 50% of respondents identifying that they worked in Latin America and 33% in Africa. The survey analysis shows that, although researchers are driven in their work by many different and interacting motivations, institutional/organizational factors are very important and have much influence over individuals' behaviour. Often, making a research output freely and openly available can be in the hands of the individual, and some will act in this way. However, for many others there are perceived barriers to this, such as the lack of required resources and of institutional policies to drive these activities. Further, current behaviours in choosing routes to communicate research results are still strongly biased toward the traditional routes of publishing in journals and books and appearing at conferences, though the availability and increasing use of digital formats is starting to broaden the spread of communication pathways used. The paper ends with reference to the relevance and importance to the CIARD initiative of the results of the survey.

                | Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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                  "Tectonic Movements toward OA in the UK and Europe"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 5th, 2012

                  Peter Suber has published "Tectonic Movements toward OA in the UK and Europe" in the latest issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Because this article is long, I'm including a table of contents:

                  1. Three major OA announcements from the UK on the same day

                  2. Some recent history as context for these announcements

                  3. Basics of the new RCUK policy

                  4. Basics of the Finch recommendations

                  5. General agreement between the RCUK policy and Finch recommendations

                  6. Appreciation of the large-scale shift to OA in the UK

                  7. Some consequences for journals and authors

                  8. Responding to publisher fears of green OA

                  9. Objections and recommendations

                  10. Announcements from Europe the day after the UK announcements

                  | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73. | Digital Scholarship |

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                    Publisher Plaintiffs Issue Statement on Order in Georgia State University E-Reserves Copyright Case

                    Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on August 15th, 2012

                    The publisher plaintiffs have issued a statement on Judge Orinda Evans' order in the Georgia State University e-reserves copyright case.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The District Court's decision is marred by a number of serious legal errors. The fair use exception cannot be stretched beyond recognition simply because course materials are delivered in a digital format by an educational institution. The ruling excuses copyright violations by GSU and endorses unauthorized copying and distribution of academic works well beyond what the law allows and what universities across the country consider reasonable. The decision devalues academic scholarship by treating such work as 'factual' compilations. . . .

                    As with the initial decision to bring suit, the decision regarding an appeal will be based on a considered assessment that takes into account the extent to which this ruling, which we believe to be legally vulnerable on multiple grounds, endangers the creation and dissemination of high-quality academic work

                    Georgia State University has also issued a statement about the order.

                    | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog | Digital Scholarship |

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                      Wiley Open Access Program Adopts Creative Commons Attribution Licence

                      Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 14th, 2012

                      Effective immediately, journals in the Wiley Open Access program will use the Creative Commons Attribution Licence for articles.

                      Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                      Rachel Burley, Vice President and Director, Open Access, commented, "Wiley is committed to meeting the evolving needs of the authors who wish to provide open access to the published articles that convey the results of their research."

                      Burley continued, "Our announcement today concerns Wiley’s fully open access journals. We are also reviewing the licensing arrangements for our hybrid program OnlineOpen, our open access option for individual articles published in subscription journals. In consultation with our publishing partners, we aim to continue to develop and deliver sustainable open access products providing author choice and high levels of service."

                      In the first instance, the journals moving to the CC-BY licence are Brain and Behavior, Ecology and Evolution, MicrobiologyOpen, Cancer Medicine, Food Science & Nutrition, Evolutionary Applications, Geoscience Data Journal and EMBO Molecular Medicine.

                      | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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                        Ebook Acquisition and Lending Briefing: Public, Academic and Research Libraries

                        Posted in E-Books, Libraries, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on August 13th, 2012

                        The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals has released Ebook Acquisition and Lending Briefing: Public, Academic and Research Libraries .

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        This paper presents some of the legal, strategic and technical problems that arise from the addition of scholarly and trade ebooks to library collections, together with possible solutions. Some of the most common business models are briefly set out. The latest data on ebook usage is also included.

                        Also of interest: ALA's recent Ebook Business Models for Public Libraries.

                        | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

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