Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Harvard School of Public Health Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 3rd, 2012

The Harvard School of Public Health has adopted an open access policy. It is the eighth Harvard school to do so.

Here's an excerpt:

Each Faculty member grants to the President and Fellows of Harvard College permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles. More specifically, each Faculty member grants to the President and Fellows a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit, and to authorize others to do the same. The policy applies to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while the person is a member of the Faculty except for any articles completed before the adoption of this policy and any articles for which the Faculty member entered into an incompatible licensing or assignment agreement before the adoption of this policy. The Dean or Dean's designate will waive application of the license for a particular article or delay access for a specified period of time upon express direction by a Faculty member.

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    Georgia Institute of Technology Adopts Open Access Policy

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on November 30th, 2012

    The Georgia Institute of Technology has adopted an open access policy.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Each Faculty member grants to Georgia Tech Research Corporation (hereinafter "GTRC") nonexclusive permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles for the purpose of open dissemination. In legal terms, each Faculty member grants to GTRC a nonexclusive, irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide license to exercise any and all copyrights in his or her scholarly articles published in any medium, provided the articles are not sold or licensed for a profit by GTRC or any GTRC-granted licensee.

    This policy applies to all published scholarly articles that any person authors or co-authors while appointed as a member of the Faculty, except for any such articles authored or co-authored before the adoption of this policy, or subject to a conflicting agreement formed before the adoption of this policy, or conducted under a classified research agreement. Upon notification by the author, the Provost or Provost's designate will waive application of this license for a particular article. At author request, access will be delayed for up to one year.

    To assist in distributing the scholarly articles, each Faculty member will make available an electronic copy of his or her final version of the article at no charge to a designated representative of the Provost's Office in appropriate formats (such as PDF) specified by the Provost’s Office, no later than the date of publication.

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      "Who’s Tracking Your Reading Habits? An E-Book Buyer’s Guide to Privacy, 2012 Edition"

      Posted in E-Books, Privacy, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 30th, 2012

      The EFF has released "Who's Tracking Your Reading Habits? An E-Book Buyer's Guide to Privacy, 2012 Edition."

      Here's an excerpt:

      As we've done since 2009, again we've taken some of the most popular e-book platforms and combed through their privacy policies for answers to common privacy questions that users deserve to know. In many cases, these answers were frustratingly vague and long-winded. In nearly all cases, reading e-books means giving up more privacy than browsing through a physical bookstore or library, or reading a paper book in your own home. Here, we've examined the policies of Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo, Sony, Overdrive, Indiebound, Internet Archive, and Adobe Content Server for answers to the following questions:

      • Can they keep track of searches for books?
      • Can they monitor what you're reading and how you're reading it after purchase and link that information back to you? Can they do that when the e-book is obtained elsewhere?
      • What compatibility does the device have with books not purchased from an associated eBook store?
      • Do they keep a record of book purchases? Can they track book purchases or acquisitions made from other sources?
      • With whom can they share the information collected in non-aggregated form?
      • Do they have mechanisms for customers to access, correct, or delete the information?
      • Can they share information outside the company without the customer's consent?

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        Canadian Research Knowledge Network Will Cancel National License Agreement with American Chemical Society

        Posted in Licenses, Publishing on November 29th, 2012

        The Canadian Research Knowledge Network will cancel a national license agreement for the American Chemical Society's Web Editions and Legacy Archives products.

        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

        Termination of the CRKN-ACS license will take effect at the end of 2013, at which time participating libraries may choose to contract directly with ACS or implement alternate arrangements. . . .

        Under ACS's new pricing, costs for participant libraries will be determined solely by usage, using the average number of full-text downloads from the most recent three years, and with participating institutions organized into usage bands. Any growth in usage that would move a participating institution into a higher usage band would result in a prohibitive price increase that could double or triple the cost of the ACS content. This pricing regime represents a huge financial risk for those libraries that are most committed to promoting ACS resources, and will penalize those who are most successful in integrating ACS content into new web- and mobile-based discovery and access systems that are used increasingly by university researchers and students.

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          The Potential Role for Intermediaries in Managing the Payment of Open Access Article Processing Charges (APCs)

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on November 28th, 2012

          JISC has released The Potential Role for Intermediaries in Managing the Payment of Open Access Article Processing Charges (APCs).

          Here's an excerpt:

          This report examines the operational challenges that universities, funders and publishers face in the UK relating to the payment of article processing charges (APCs)—the charges levied by the publishers of open access and hybrid journals to meet the costs of the publication process. It then examines the feasibility of using intermediaries of various kinds to provide services to aggregate payments as between universities and publishers, along with other services relating to the processes involved in ensuring that an article is published on open access terms. . . .

          We conclude as a result of our work that with a very few exceptions, the systems and processes currently associated with the payment of APCs are sub-optimal, and could present a significant barrier to the wider adoption of open access publishing.

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            "An Emerging Consensus for Open Evaluation: 18 Visions for the Future of Scientific Publishing"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 20th, 2012

            Nikolaus Kriegeskorte, Alexander Walther, and Diana Deca have published "An Emerging Consensus for Open Evaluation: 18 Visions for the Future of Scientific Publishing" in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

            Here's an excerpt:

            A grand challenge of our time, therefore, is to design the future system, by which we evaluate papers and decide which ones deserve broad attention and deep reading. However, it is unclear how exactly OE [Open Evaluation] and the future system for scientific publishing should work. This motivated us to edit the Research Topic "Beyond open access: visions for open evaluation of scientific papers by post-publication peer review" in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. The Research Topic includes 18 papers, each going beyond mere criticism of the status quo and laying out a detailed vision for the ideal future system. . . .

            While each paper elaborates on particular challenges, the solutions proposed have much overlap, and where distinct solutions are proposed, these are generally compatible. This puts us in a position to present our synopsis here as a coherent blueprint for the future system that reflects the consensus among the contributors.1

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              Authors Guild et al. v. Google: "Brief of Amici Curiae Academic Authors in Support of Defendant-Appellant and Reversal"

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Books, Google and Other Search Engines, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on November 20th, 2012

              Pamela Samuelson and David R. Hansen have self-archived "Brief of Amici Curiae Academic Authors in Support of Defendant-Appellant and Reversal" in SSRN.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Summary of argument: Class certification was improperly granted below because the District Court failed to conduct a rigorous analysis of the adequacy of representation factor, as Rule 23(a)(4) requires. The three individual plaintiffs who claim to be class representatives are not academics and do not share the commitment to broad access to knowledge that predominates among academics. . . .

              Academic authors desire broad public access to their works such as that which the Google Books project provides. Although the District Court held that the plaintiffs had inadequately represented the interests of academic authors in relation to the proposed settlement, it failed to recognize that pursuit of this litigation would be even more adverse to the interests of academic authors than the proposed settlement was. . . .

              In short, a "win" in this case for the class representatives would be a "loss" for academic authors. It is precisely this kind of conflict that courts have long recognized should prevent class certification due to inadequate representation. The District Court failed to adequately address this fundamental conflict in its certification order, though it was well aware of the conflict through submissions and objections received from the settlement fairness hearing through to the hearings on the most recent class certification motions. Because of that failure, the order certifying the class should be reversed

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                DOAB User Needs Analysis—Final Report

                Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on November 19th, 2012

                The Directory of Open Access Books has released the DOAB User Needs Analysis—Final Report.

                Here's an excerpt:

                This final evaluation and recommendation report is based on the user experiences, needs, and expectations as they emerged from the qualitative components (survey, workshop and online discussion platform) that were used to conduct the DOAB User Needs Analysis. This final public report, intended for the wider academic and publishing community, aims to advise in the establishment of procedures, criteria and standards concerning the set-up and functioning of the DOAB platform and service and to devise guidelines and recommendations for admissions to DOAB and for its further development, sustainability and implementation.

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