Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Open Monograph Press, Release 1.0

Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Books on March 28th, 2013

The Public Knowledge Project has released the Open Monograph Press, Release 1.0.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

OMP is designed to assist university presses, learned societies, and scholar-publishers interested in publishing scholarly books in print-on-demand and multiple electronic formats, whether on an open access or purchase basis. OMP is intended to:

  • Handle edited volumes, with different authors for each chapter;
  • Involve editors, authors, reviewers, designers, indexers, and others in book production;
  • See submission through multiple rounds of both internal and external reviews;
  • Utilize industry standard ONIX for bookseller metadata requirements (e.g., Amazon);
  • Create document libraries for submissions, recording contracts, permissions, etc.;
  • Handle thumbnail covers in Catalog, as well as Spotlight features; and
  • Enable Series Editors to see books through review to publication.

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    Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment

    Posted in Libraries, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Communication on March 27th, 2013

    The the Association of College & Research Libraries has released Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment.

    Here's an excerpt:

    In this paper, we identify three intersections between information literacy and scholarly communications that have developed as a result of the effects of the digital age on scholarly publishing and on teaching information research skills:

    1. ) economics of the distribution of scholarship (including access to scholarship, the changing nature of scholarly publishing, and the education of students to be knowledgeable content consumers and content creators);
    2. ) digital literacies (including teaching new technologies and rights issues, and the emergence of multiple types of non-textual content);
    3. ) our changing roles (including the imperative to contribute to the building of new infrastructures for scholarship, and deep involvement with creative approaches to teaching).

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      University of Rhode Island Adopts Open Access Policy

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 25th, 2013

      The University of Rhode Island has adopted an open access policy.

      This year, Amherst College, the College of Wooster, Connecticut College, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Library Faculty, and Wellesley College have all adopted open access policies.

      (See Peter Suber's Google+ announcements of these policies.)

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        Entire Editorial Board of Journal of Library Administration Resigns

        Posted in Author Rights, Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 25th, 2013

        There have been several reports stating that the editorial board of the Journal of Library Administration has resigned. The Journal of Library Administration is published by Taylor & Francis, which publishes a number of library and information science journals.

        Here's an excerpt from Brian Mathews's "So I'm Editing This Journal Issue and . . ." in which he quotes an e-mail from Damon Jaggars:

        "The Board believes that the licensing terms in the Taylor & Francis author agreement are too restrictive and out-of-step with the expectations of authors in the LIS community."

        "A large and growing number of current and potential authors to JLA have pushed back on the licensing terms included in the Taylor & Francis author agreement. Several authors have refused to publish with the journal under the current licensing terms."

        "Authors find the author agreement unclear and too restrictive and have repeatedly requested some form of Creative Commons license in its place."

        "After much discussion, the only alternative presented by Taylor & Francis tied a less restrictive license to a $2995 per article fee to be paid by the author. As you know, this is not a viable licensing option for authors from the LIS community who are generally not conducting research under large grants."

        "Thus, the Board came to the conclusion that it is not possible to produce a quality journal under the current licensing terms offered by Taylor & Francis and chose to collectively resign."

        The Editorial Board members are:

        Damon Jaggars (Editor)
        Kristin Antelman
        Chris Bourg
        Lisa German
        Fred M. Heath
        Paula T. Kaufman
        Deanna B. Marcum
        Sarah C. Michalak
        James G. Neal
        Ann J. Wolpert
        Makoto Nakamoto
        Stephen Town

        Read more about it at "Editorial Board Resigns from T&F Journal to Protest Restrictive Licensing," "The Journal of Library Administration," and "My Short Stint on the JLA Editorial Board."

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          "Beyond TEI: Returning the Text to the Reader"

          Posted in E-Books, Metadata, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on March 20th, 2013

          Christian Wittern has published "Beyond TEI: Returning the Text to the Reader" in the latest issue of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Much research and effort has been invested in creating a versatile format for digital texts and the TEI is now widely used in many communities. Much less consolidated thought has been spend to publish and distribute digital texts in ways that are most useful to scholars. To remedy this situation, this paper proposes new, additional publication forms for digital texts through distributed version control systems. This will allow publication and maintainence of several different versions of a text. In some respects, this will be similar to publishing a college or paperback edition of the text established in a critical edition. In addition to this, the user of a text published through such a system can subscribe to later changes or corrections of an edition. The architectural model proposed in this paper tries to contribute to a fundamental protocol that could form the base for applications serving the long-term needs of research and scholarship.

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            eBook Use and Acceptance in an Undergraduate Institution

            Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on March 19th, 2013

            Springer has released eBook Use and Acceptance in an Undergraduate Institution.

            Here's an excerpt :

            The survey finds high use of eBooks at Wellesley College, with 70% of the respondents indicating they have used eBooks. Other recent international surveys of eBook use have shown 52-64% of students or faculty responding that they have used eBooks (Figure 10). Within the general U.S. population 21% of adults reported having used eBooks in 2011. Some eBook use by Wellesley students and faculty may be non-academic, leisure reading, but half of Wellesley's eBook users report having used eBooks from the Wellesley College Library's collection.

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              "F1000 Recommendations as a New Data Source for Research Evaluation: A Comparison with Citations"

              Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on March 19th, 2013

              Ludo Waltman and Rodrigo Costas have self-archived "F1000 Recommendations as a New Data Source for Research Evaluation: A Comparison with Citations" in arXiv.org.

              Here's an excerpt:

              F1000 is a post-publication peer review service for biological and medical research. F1000 aims to recommend important publications in the biomedical literature, and from this perspective F1000 could be an interesting tool for research evaluation. By linking the complete database of F1000 recommendations to the Web of Science bibliographic database, we are able to make a comprehensive comparison between F1000 recommendations and citations. We find that about 2% of the publications in the biomedical literature receive at least one F1000 recommendation. Recommended publications on average receive 1.30 recommendations, and over 90% of the recommendations are given within half a year after a publication has appeared. There turns out to be a clear correlation between F1000 recommendations and citations. However, the correlation is relatively weak, at least weaker than the correlation between journal impact and citations.

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                "SSRN and Law Journals—Rivals or Allies?"

                Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on February 15th, 2013

                Ian Ramsay has self-archived "SSRN and Law Journals—Rivals or Allies?" in SSRN.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The author identifies and evaluates the respective merits of publication in law journals and publication on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN)—the largest open access repository for legal scholarship. This evaluation leads to the conclusion that at this stage of the evolution of law journals and SSRN, there are advantages in authors publishing both in journals and on SSRN. However, publication on SSRN can have particular advantages for authors in smaller countries.

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