Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"Evaluating an Open Access Publishing Fund at a Comprehensive University"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on February 8th, 2016

Sarah Beaubien, Julie Garrison, and Doug Way have published "Evaluating an Open Access Publishing Fund at a Comprehensive University" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

Wanting to learn how faculty have benefitted from an open access publishing fund, Grand Valley State University Libraries surveyed recipients of the fund. The survey asked authors why they chose an open access publishing option and whether the fund influenced this decision. Authors were also asked whether they perceived that selecting an open access option broadened exposure to their work and about their likelihood of choosing open access in the future.

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    "An Interview with Jeffrey Beall"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 8th, 2016

    Joseph Esposito has published "An Interview with Jeffrey Beall" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

    Here's an excerpt:

    [Beall] In the scholarly open access segment of the scholarly publishing industry, we are seeing that the most prosperous publishers are the larger ones, those able to offshore their production work. Hindawi (in Egypt) and MDPI (with most of its work done in China) are two examples. I think the industry will continue to select for publishers like these, meaning many production-related jobs in North America and Europe will move to South Asia and East Asia.

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      Association of Universities in the Netherlands and John Wiley Announce Open Access Agreement

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2016

      The Association of Universities in the Netherlands and John Wiley and Sons, Inc. have announced an open access agreement.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      The negotiations between VSNU and Wiley resulted in an unprecedented agreement covering 2016 – 2019. It provides students and researchers at Dutch universities affiliated to the VSNU with access to all Wiley subscription journal content and enables authors at Dutch universities affiliated to the VSNU to enjoy unlimited open access publication in Wiley's hybrid journals (c.1400), with no publishing charge levied at the article level.

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        "Are ‘Predatory’ Journals Completely Negative, or Also a Sign of Something Positive?"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 4th, 2016

        Jan Velterop has published "Are 'Predatory' Journals Completely Negative, or Also a Sign of Something Positive?" in SciELO in Perspective.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Yet, even with the drawback of being polluted by predatory journals, a functioning market is preferable to a quasi-market, completely dominated by monopolies or monopoly-like players. A system of subscriptions, in which the party who pays—the institutional library—has practically no meaningful choice of what to buy, differs from one of article processing charges (APCs, which make open access possible), in that the party who pays—the author—is the party who does have a meaningful choice of where to submit and publish. So 'flipping' the system from subscriptions to APCs does deliver something much more akin to a functioning market, and 'caveat emptor', 'buyer beware', applies to all markets.

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          "CHORUS Signs Agreement with US Department of Defense to Advance Public Access to Research"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 4th, 2016

          CHORUS has released "CHORUS Signs Agreement with US Department of Defense to Advance Public Access to Research."

          Here's an excerpt:

          DTIC will employ CHORUS' services to build on open standards, distributed networks and established infrastructure to advance access to scholarly articles reporting on DoD-funded research, as well as enable agency indexing and long-term preservation of those articles. The DoD system will dovetail with the interoperable CHORUS framework, along with Crossref's Open Funder Registry, to provide an article submission workflow for DoD-funded researchers and facilitate public access to all articles that report on DoD-funded research. The agreement enables readers searching DTIC's Public Access Search to follow links that point to publicly available articles/accepted manuscripts in context of the journal where they were published.

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            "Library Publishing and Diversity Values: Changing Scholarly Publishing through Policy and Scholarly Communication Education"

            Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on February 3rd, 2016

            Charlotte Roh has published "Library Publishing and Diversity Values: Changing Scholarly Publishing through Policy and Scholarly Communication Education" in College & Research Libraries News.

            Here's an excerpt:

            What are the consequences of this lack of diversity in publishing, librarianship, and faculty? We know already that privilege can bias access to material, which is part of why the open access movement exists, to alleviate the barriers that cost can create for researchers. However, one possible consequence is a feedback loop in scholarship that privileges and publishes the majority voice, which is often white and male.

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              "Bibliometric and Benchmark Analysis of Gold Open Access in Spain: Big Output and Little Impact"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on January 27th, 2016

              Daniel Torres-Salinas et al. have published "Bibliometric and Benchmark Analysis of Gold Open Access in Spain: Big Output and Little Impact" in El Profesional de la Información.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This bibliometric study analyzes the research output produced by Spain during the 2005-2014 time period in Open Access (OA) journals indexed in Web of Science.. . . . Spain is the second highest ranking European country with gold OA publication output and the fourth highest in Open Access output (9%). . . . Spain's normalized citation impact in Open access (0.72) is lower than the world average and that of the main European countries.

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                "An Update on Peer Review and Research Data"

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 26th, 2016

                Fiona Murphy has published "An Update on Peer Review and Research Data" in Learned Publishing.

                Here's an excerpt:

                As has been outlined here, the question of how to review research data and incorporate this into the publication process remains a knotty one. Various groups have made a certain amount of progress with potential recommendations, and domain-related and technical support functions are also emerging. However, the critical mass of active researchers has so far failed to engage.

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                  "Peer Review in Megajournals Compared with Traditional Scholarly Journals: Does It Make a Difference?"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 26th, 2016

                  Bo-Christer Björk and Paul Catani have published "Peer Review in Megajournals Compared with Traditional Scholarly Journals: Does It Make a Difference?" in Learned Publishing.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  We report on a small pilot study in which we looked at the citation distributions for articles in megajournals compared with journals with traditional peer review, which also evaluate articles for contribution and novelty. We found that elite journals with very low acceptance rates have far fewer articles with no or few citations, but that the long tail of articles with two citations or less was actually bigger in a sample of selective traditional journals in comparison with megajournals.

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                    "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 22nd, 2016

                    Xianwen Wang, Shenmeng Xu, and Zhichao Fang have self-archived "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    In this study, we propose a novel way to explore the patterns of people's visits to academic articles. About 3.4 million links to referral source of visitors of 1432 papers published in the journal of PeerJ are collected and analyzed. We find that at least 57% visits are from external referral sources, among which General Search Engine, Social Network, and News & Blog are the top three categories of referrals. Academic Resource, including academic search engines and academic publishers' sites, is the fourth largest category of referral sources. In addition, our results show that Google contributes significantly the most in directing people to scholarly articles. . . . Correlation analysis and regression analysis indicates that papers with more mentions are expected to have more visitors, and Facebook, Twitter and Reddit are the most commonly used social networking tools that refer people to PeerJ.

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                      "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads"

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 20th, 2016

                      Christine Okret-Manville has published "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads" in LIBER Quarterly.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      For some years, researchers have been using new ways to communicate and share their work by using academic social networks. In an attempt to foster the development of Open Access in France, the French consortium COUPERIN (Unified Consortium of Higher Education and Research Organizations for Access to Numerical Publications) proposed that academic social networks could be used to convince researchers of becoming more involved in Open Access. To test this hypothesis, a nationwide survey was launched in 2014 to explore whether and how these academic social networks are used to share content, but also how they compare to other Open Access classic tools. Within a month (20 May to 20 June), 1,898 researchers answered this 28-question survey. It was fully completed by 1,698 of them.

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                        "Publishing as Pedagogy: Connecting Library Services and Technology"

                        Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on January 18th, 2016

                        Laurie Alexander et al. have published "Publishing as Pedagogy: Connecting Library Services and Technology" in EDUCAUSE Review.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        In the following three case studies we profile three student publishing outputs (a journal, a book, and an exhibit) from the University of Michigan Library. Beyond describing the products themselves, we identify the opportunities that the librarians involved found to emphasize particular learning experiences during the creation process.

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