Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"Scholarly Communication and Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 22nd, 2016

Hailey Mooney has self-archived "Scholarly Communication and Data."

Here's an excerpt:

The purpose of this chapter is to provide foundational knowledge for the data librarian by developing an understanding of the place of data within the current paradigm of networked digital scholarly communication. This includes defining the nature of data and data publications, examining the open science movement and its effects on data sharing, and delving into the challenges inherent to the wider integration of data into the scholarly communication system and the academic library

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 6. Over 560 works. Over 200 works added. Live links. Selected abstracts. OA. CC-BY License. Covers topics such as research data creation, acquisition, metadata, repositories, provenance, management, policies, support services, funding agency requirements, peer review, publication, citation, sharing, reuse, and preservation.

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    Libraries as Publishers in the Early 1990s

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Texas Academic Libraries on June 22nd, 2016

    In recent years, there has been an upsurge in interest in academic and other types libraries acting as publishers and considerable discussion about how this will transform them.

    What is sometimes lost in the excitement over the library publishing movement is historical context: this trend started over a quarter century ago at the dawn of the Internet age. While most e-journals published in the early 1990s were produced by scholars acting as digital publishers, at least two academic libraries established formal digital publishing programs in this period: the University of Houston Libraries and the Virginia Tech Libraries.

    In August 1989, the Director of the University of Houston Libraries, Robin N. Downes, authorized the establishment and announcement of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (PACS Review), the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. The journal began publication in January 1990, became refereed in November 1991, and ceased publication in August 2000. Authors retained the copyright to PACS Review articles. Unrestricted copying of PACS Review articles was permitted for educational, noncommercial use by academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries.

    Only partial use statistics are available for the journal. It was initially distributed using the LISTSERV software, and LISTSERV use statistics were not tallied. From 1994 through 1996, the journal received over 81,000 Gopher requests. From March 1995 through 2005, the journal received over 3.5 file requests via the Web.

    In October 1996, Robin N. Downes authorized the establishment of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access, updated electronic book that provided references to new works related to scholarly electronic publishing, such as books, journal articles, magazine articles, technical reports, and white papers.

    Between October 1996 and October 2006, 64 versions of the e-book were published by the University of Houston Libraries. There were over six million file requests for it during this period.

    In the fall of 1989, Virginia Tech's Vice President for Information Systems, Dr. Robert Heterick, established the Scholarly Communications Project. The project was subsequently moved to the University Libraries, and it was directed by Lon Savage until December 1993, when Gail McMillan took over.

    Since 1990, the Virginia Tech Libraries have published a number of e-journals, some of which were previously published by other entities prior to being migrated to the Libraries. Notably, the Scholarly Communications Project published the first issue of The Journal of the International Academy of Hospitality Research in November 1990. The journal was published in cooperation with Virginia Tech's Department of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management. It ceased publication in 1998. It is described in "The Journal of the International Academy of Hospitality Research."

    The Virginia Tech Libraries' Scholarly Communication department currently publishes e-journals, conference proceedings, and open educational resources.

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      "Open Access, Innovation, and Research Infrastructure"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 21st, 2016

      Benedikt Fecher and Gert G. Wagner have published "Open Access, Innovation, and Research Infrastructure" in Publications.

      Here's an excerpt:

      In this article we argue that the current endeavors to achieve open access in scientific literature require a discussion about innovation in scholarly publishing and research infrastructure. Drawing on path dependence theory and addressing different open access (OA) models and recent political endeavors, we argue that academia is once again running the risk of outsourcing the organization of its content.

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        "The Vienna Principles: A Vision for Scholarly Communication in the 21st Century"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 20th, 2016

        Open Access Network Austria has released "The Vienna Principles: A Vision for Scholarly Communication in the 21st Century ."

        Here's an excerpt:

        Currently, there is a strong push to address the apparent deficits of the scholarly communication system. Open Science has the potential to change the production and dissemination of scholarly knowledge for the better, but there is no commonly shared vision that describes the system that we want to create.

        Between April 2015 and June 2016, members of the Open Access Network Austria (OANA) working group "Open Access and Scholarly Communication" met in Vienna to discuss this matter. The main outcome of our considerations is a set of twelve principles that represent the cornerstones of the future scholarly communication system. They are designed to provide a coherent frame of reference for the debate on how to improve the current system. With this document, we are hoping to inspire a widespread discussion towards a shared vision for scholarly communication in the 21st century.

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          Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015: A Subject Approach

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 17th, 2016

          Walt Crawford has released Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015: A Subject Approach as a free PDF or a low-cost paperback.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          This book is a supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015. It adds a chapter for each of 28 subjects and slightly expands the three subject-segment chapters from the other book.

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            "Wiley Reports Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2015 Results"

            Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 16th, 2016

            John Wiley & Sons has released "Wiley Reports Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2015 Results."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Revenue: Fourth quarter revenue on a constant currency basis declined 1% to $275 million, with a decline in journal subscription (-2%) and print book (-8%) revenue offsetting growth in other journal revenue (+6%), digital books (+3%), and funded access (+3%). For the year, revenue on a constant currency basis rose 2% to $1,041 million, driven by journal subscriptions (+1%), funded access (+29%), and other journal revenue (+15%), which offset an overall book decline of 7%.

            See also: "Wiley Touts Digital Progress in Down Fiscal 2016."

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              "Open Access Publishing Trend Analysis: Statistics Beyond the Perception"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on June 15th, 2016

              Elisabetta Poltronieri et al. have published "Open Access Publishing Trend Analysis: Statistics Beyond the Perception" in Information Research.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The purpose of this analysis was twofold: to track the number of open access journals acquiring impact factor, and to investigate the distribution of subject categories pertaining to these journals. As a case study, journals in which the researchers of the National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) in Italy have published were surveyed.

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                "Transparency and Openness to Scientific Publishing: The Finnish Research Organisations Pay Millions of Euros Annually to the Large Publishers"

                Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on June 15th, 2016

                The Open Science and Research Initiative has released "Transparency and Openness to Scientific Publishing: The Finnish Research Organisations Pay Millions of Euros Annually to the Large Publishers."

                Here's an excerpt:

                Open Science and Research Initiative announces the scientific publisher costs paid by Finnish universities and research organizations from 2010 to 2015. According to the data, the publisher costs have risen around ten percent per year. . . .

                Publisher cost data is now available as open data licensed under CC BY 4.0 license. You are free to share and adapt the data for any purpose, with author attribution and indication if changes were made. Publisher cost details and a link to the web application can be found at openscience.fi/publisher_costs.

                See also: "Scientific Journal Subscription Costs in Finland 2010-2015: A Preliminary Analysis."

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                  "Measuring the Degrees of Openness of Scholarly Journals with the Open Access Spectrum (OAS) Evaluation Tool"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 13th, 2016

                  Xiaotian Chen and Tom Olijhoek have published "Measuring the Degrees of Openness of Scholarly Journals with the Open Access Spectrum (OAS) Evaluation Tool" in Serials Review.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  HowOpenIsIt is a guide created by SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), PLOS (Public Library of Science), and OASPA (Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association) to describe an array of policies a journal can have in the continuum between "Open" and "Closed." The OAS Evaluation Tool uses the HowOpenIsIt guide to measure the degree of openness of journals of all kinds with scores between 0 and 100. A total of 1,005 journal samples, both OA and non-OA journals in various languages and from various parts of the world, were evaluated and scored with the OAS Evaluation Tool by a team of information professionals in 2015 based on the policies posted on journals' websites. This article reports the findings of the OAS evaluation.

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                    "Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2016

                    College & Research Libraries has released an e-print of "Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much" by John Wenzler.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Why has the rise of the Internet—which drastically reduces the cost of distributing information—coincided with drastic increases in the prices that academic libraries pay for access to scholarly journals?This study argues that libraries are trapped in a collective action dilemma as defined by economist Mancur Olson in The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. To truly reduce their costs, librarians would have to build a shared online collection of scholarly resources jointly managed by the academic community as a whole, but individual academic institutions lack the private incentives necessary to invest in a shared collection. Thus, the management of online scholarly journals has been largely outsourced to publishers who have developed monopoly powers that allow them to increase subscription prices faster than the rate of inflation. Many librarians consider the Open Access Movement the best response to increased subscription costs, but the current strategies employed to achieve Open Access also are undermined by collective action dilemmas. In conclusion, some alternative strategies are proposed.

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                      Karger Publishers Agreement Allows Researchers at 9 UKB Members to Publish Up to 250 OA Articles per Year without APCs

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 9th, 2016

                      Karger Publishers has reached an agreement with nine menders of the Dutch UKB consortium that allows affiliated authors to publish up to 250 open access articles per year without APCs.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      The consortial agreement grants the participating UKB libraries and their clients full perpetual access to all Karger journal content of 2016 and 2017 as before. The novel part is that affiliated authors may publish up to 250 OA articles per year with Karger without having to pay the usual OA Article Processing Charges (APCs). Authors are free to submit to any of the 100 plus peer-reviewed hybrid and full OA Karger journals; however, they are asked to mention their affiliation with a participating institution during submission.

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                        Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?

                        Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 9th, 2016

                        Stephen Curry has self-archived "Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?"

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        To set the scene, I will begin with a brief description of the open access movement and recent policy initiatives before discussing their impact on the attitudes of scientists towards the broader open science agenda and public engagement. I will then consider the effects of open access (and allied moves) on the authority and independence of science—concepts that are perturbed by the increasingly blurred boundary between the academy and the public. Lastly, I will focus attention on the various publics that are actively seeking to engage with science and scientists, mainly through advocacy groups or the growing ranks of citizen scientists; here, while the impact of open access appears relatively modest, it has the capacity to spring surprises that point to future growth.

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