Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"PeerJ Grows Steadily With Papers, Authors"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 22nd, 2014

Phil Davis has published "PeerJ Grows Steadily With Papers, Authors" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

PeerJ is growing, publishing more papers and attracting more authors, although it is not clear whether the company is moving toward financial sustainability. In a crowded market of multidisciplinary open access journals, the success/failure of PeerJ may be determined when it receives its first Impact Factor.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    "The Open Access Advantage for American Law Reviews"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 21st, 2014

    James M. Donovan et al. have self-archived "The Open Access Advantage for American Law Reviews."

    Here's an excerpt:

    Articles available in open access formats enjoy an advantage in citation by subsequent law review works of 53%. For every two citations an article would otherwise receive, it can expect a third when made freely available on the Internet. This benefit is not uniformly spread through the law school tiers. Higher tier journals experience a lower OA advantage (11.4%) due to the attention such prestigious works routinely receive regardless of the format. When focusing on the availability of new scholarship, as compared to creating retrospective collections, the aggregated advantage rises to 60.2%. While the first tier advantage rises to 16.8%, the mid-tiers skyrocket to 89.7%. The fourth tier OA advantage comes in at 81.2%.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "Freedom of Information Requests Uncover the Lack of Transparency in Journal Subscription Costs"

      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on October 16th, 2014

      Stuart Lawson and Ben Meghreblian have published "Freedom of Information Requests Uncover the Lack of Transparency in Journal Subscription Costs" in The LSE's Daily Blog on American Politics and Policy.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Making use of the UK's Freedom of Information (FOI) law we sent FOI requests to over 100 higher education institutions via the website whatdotheyknow.com asking them to release their data. Using this website has the dual benefit of making the process simple to scale up when sending multiple requests and also ensuring that the responses are in the public domain.

      In two rounds of requests we asked for the amount of money that these institutions had paid to six of the largest academic publishers—Wiley, Springer, Taylor & Francis, Sage, Oxford University Press, and Cambridge University Press—over a period of five years. The results have been collated and over £80m of subscription expenditure has been openly released. This process was for the most part straightforward and just required a lot of persistence and a little knowledge of library processes, which allowed us to know how to phrase the request and how to respond to any queries from the institutions.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        "Exposing the Predators: Methods to Stop Predatory Journals"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 15th, 2014

        Margot Wehrmeijer has self-archived "Exposing the Predators: Methods to Stop Predatory Journals."

        Here's an excerpt:

        This thesis looks at three possible methods to stop predatory journals: black-and white-lists, open peer review systems and new metrics. Black- and white-lists have set up rules and regulations that credible publishers and journals should follow. Open peer review systems should make it harder for predatory publishers to make false claims about their peer review process. Metrics should measure more aspects of research impact and become less liable to gaming. The question is, which of these three methods is the best candidate to stop predatory journals.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          "Wall Street Analysts Say Open Access Has Failed Due to Lack of Focus, but Their Analysis Might Help It Succeed"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 14th, 2014

          Curt Rice has published "Wall Street Analysts Say Open Access Has Failed Due to Lack of Focus, but Their Analysis Might Help It Succeed" in The LSE's Daily Blog on American Politics and Policy.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The absence of clear leadership at the helm of the open access movement is made painfully clear in a recent report about Elsevier's value as a company, entitled Goodbye to Berlin—The Fading Threat of Open Access. Why could the authors of this report at Bernstein Research let go of their earlier concerns and now upgrade their predictions about Elsevier's stock? "The rise of OA," they write, "has inflicted little or no damage on the leading subscription publishers."

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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            "Journals and ‘Journals': Taking a Deeper Look"

            Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 14th, 2014

            Walt Crawford has published "Journals and 'Journals': Taking a Deeper Look" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            This essay builds on the July 2014 Cites & Insights investigation by including full article counts for the thousands of OA journals in Beall's lists (that is, those that actually publish articles!) and those published by OASPA members, extending the article counts back to 2011, and modifying the groups of journals to be more meaningful.

            It also introduces the rough numbers for the new set of Gold OA journals that will form the heart of Part 2 of this two-part essay (the December 2014 C&I), namely more than three thousand journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that aren't in one of the other two sets, that do have enough English in the interface for me to analyze them and that are not on biology-related or human medicine-related topics.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              Nature Communications Goes Full Open Access

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 23rd, 2014

              Formerly a born-digital hybrid journal, Nature Communications will now be an open access only journal.

              Here's an excerpt from the press release:

              Nature Communications is to become the first Nature-branded open access only journal. The number one open access journal in multidisciplinary sciences, Nature Communications is Nature Publishing Group's (NPG) flagship open access title. Nature Communications will only accept open access research submissions from 20th October 2014. . . .

              NPG is also making further policy moves with this development. Nature Communications now offers the CC BY 4.0 license as default, with other Creative Commons (CC) licenses available upon request. There is no price difference for the choice of CC license. APC waivers will be available for HINARI countries, and to others on a case-by-case basis.

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                CERN and APS Announce Open Access Partnership

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 19th, 2014

                American Physical Society and The European Organization for Nuclear Research have formed a partnership to make CERN-authored articles published in APS journals open access.

                Here's an excerpt from the press release:

                Articles in APS' Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C in 2015 and 2016 will be covered by this agreement.

                Thanks to this partnership, articles will be available free of charge for everyone to read. Copyright will remain with the authors and permissive Creative Commons CC-BY licences will allow re-use of the information (e.g. in books, review articles, conference proceedings and teaching material) as well as text- and data-mining applications.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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