Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"We Can Shift Academic Culture through Publishing Choices" (Version 2)

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 23rd, 2017

Corina J Logan has published "We Can Shift Academic Culture through Publishing Choices" (Version 2) in F1000Research.

Here's an excerpt:

Researchers give papers for free (and often actually pay) to exploitative publishers who make millions off of our articles by locking them behind paywalls. This discriminates not only against the public (who are usually the ones that paid for the research in the first place), but also against the academics from institutions that cannot afford to pay for journal subscriptions and the ‘scholarly poor’. I explain exploitative and ethical publishing practices, highlighting choices researchers can make right now to stop exploiting ourselves and discriminating against others.

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"Prevalence and Citation Advantage of Gold Open Access n the Subject Areas of the Scopus Database"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on August 23rd, 2017

Pablo Dorta-González and Yolanda Santana-Jiménez have self-archived "Prevalence and Citation Advantage of Gold Open Access n the Subject Areas of the Scopus Database."

Here's an excerpt:

In the present paper, an analysis of gold OA from across all areas of research -the 27 subject areas of the Scopus database- is realized. As a novel contribution, this paper takes a journal-level approach to assessing the OA citation advantage, whereas many others take a paper-level approach. Data were obtained from Scimago Lab, sorted using Scopus database, and tagged as OA/non-OA using the DOAJ list. Jointly with the OA citation advantage, the OA prevalence as well as the differences between access types (OA vs. non-OA) in production and referencing are tested. A total of 3,737 OA journals (16.8%) and 18,485 non-OA journals (83.2%) published in 2015 are considered. As the main conclusion, there is no generalizable gold OA citation advantage at journal level.

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"Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2017

Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren has published "Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing..

Here's an excerpt:

Given the demand for open access publishing in the context of expensive article processing charges and acquisition costs scholarly publishing needs to be transformed. I believe that university libraries are in a good position to contribute to this change. I begin with describing what Stockholm University Press is, what we do and how. I continue with describing why we do it and for whom. I conclude by pointing out some lessons learned.

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Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on August 17th, 2017

Ithaka S+R has released Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.

Here's an excerpt:

There is widespread frustration within the academic library community with the seemingly uncontrollable price increases of e-resources, especially of licensed bundles of scholarly journals. The scholarly communications movement has vastly expanded academic and indeed public access to scholarly content. Yet prices for certain scholarly resources continue to outpace budget increases, and librarians do not feel in control of budgets and pricing. What if libraries found ways to bring together the whole library behind the objective of stabilizing or reducing what they pay?

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"Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 16th, 2017

Martin Paul Eve and Ernesto Priego have published "Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?" in tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique.

Here's an excerpt:

Predatory publishing refers to conditions under which gold open access academic publishers claim to conduct peer review and charge for their publishing services but do not, in fact, actually perform such reviews. Most prominently exposed in recent years by Jeffrey Beall, the phenomenon garners much media attention. In this article, we acknowledge that such practices are deceptive but then examine, across a variety of stakeholder groups, what the harm is from such actions to each group of actors. We find that established publishers have a strong motivation to hype claims of predation as damaging to the scholarly and scientific endeavour while noting that, in fact, systems of peer review are themselves already acknowledged as deeply flawed.

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ACS Launches ChemRxiv

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, EPrints, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on August 16th, 2017

ACS has launched ChemRxiv.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

ChemRxiv, a new chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. The Beta launch has been undertaken with initial strategic input from the American Chemical Society (ACS), Royal Society of Chemistry, German Chemical Society and other not-for profit organizations, as well as other scientific publishers and preprint services. The free-of-charge service, originally announced late last year, is managed on behalf of the chemical science community by ACS and is powered by Figshare, an online digital repository for academic research.

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"Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 8th, 2017

Teresa Auch Schultz has self-archived "Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research."

Here's an excerpt:

The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

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"The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 4th, 2017

Heather Piwowar et al. have self-archived "The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

We estimate that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA (19M in total) and that this proportion is growing, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid. The most recent year analyzed (2015) also has the highest percentage of OA (45%). Because of this growth, and the fact that readers disproportionately access newer articles, we find that Unpaywall users encounter OA quite frequently: 47% of articles they view are OA. Notably, the most common mechanism for OA is not Gold, Green, or Hybrid OA, but rather an under-discussed category we dub Bronze: articles made free-to-read on the publisher website, without an explicit Open license.

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"The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on August 2nd, 2017

Janneke Adema and Graham Stone have published "The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This article outlines the rise and development of New University Presses and Academic-Led Presses in the UK or publishing for the UK market. Based on the Jisc research project, Changing publishing ecologies: a landscape study of new university presses and academic-led publishing, commonalities between these two types of presses are identified to better assess their future needs and requirements. Based on this analysis, the article argues for the development of a publishing toolkit, for further research into the creation of a typology of presses and publishing initiatives, and for support with community building to help these initiatives grow and develop further, whilst promoting a more diverse publishing ecology.

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"Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature"

Posted in Copyright, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 25th, 2017

Daniel S Himmelstein et al. have published "Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature" in PeerJ.

Here's an excerpt:

Since its creation in 2011, Sci-Hub has grown rapidly in popularity. However, until now, the extent of Sci-Hub's coverage was unclear. As of March 2017, we find that Sci-Hub's database contains 68.9% of all 81.6 million scholarly articles, which rises to 85.2% for those published in closed access journals. Furthermore, Sci-Hub contains 77.0% of the 5.2 million articles published by inactive journals. Coverage varies by discipline, with 92.8% coverage of articles in chemistry journals compared to 76.3% for computer science. Coverage also varies by publisher, with the coverage of the largest publisher, Elsevier, at 97.3%.

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Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 24th, 2017

Jisc has released Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2016 we commissioned a research project focused on institutional publishing initiatives which includes academic-led publishing ventures (ALPs) as well as new university presses and library-led initiatives (NUPs). We are pleased to announce the publication of the report 'Changing Publishing Ecologies. A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-led Publishing', which charts the outcomes of this research. . . .

The NUP and ALP strands of the research study were co-ordinated and run in tandem by [Janneke] [Graham] Stone and Adema. This study was informed by a desk top review of current library publishing ventures in the US, Europe and Australia and an overview of international academic-led initiatives and their existing and future directions. The NUP strand consisted of a survey, which collected 43 responses, where the ALP strand was informed by interviews with 14 scholar-led presses. Taking different approaches for these two types of press, the report captures the take-up, reasoning and characteristics of these initiatives, as well as their future plans.

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"EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Google and Other Search Engines, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 21st, 2017

COMMUNIA has released "EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research."

Here's an excerpt:

Last week the Culture and Education Committee (CULT) and the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) voted on their final opinions on the Commission’s Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. . . .

The introduction of a new right for press publishers (aka the “link tax”) to extract fees from search engines for incorporating short snippets of—or even linking to—their content in article 11 is one of the most controversial issues of the proposed directive. Adopting this type of ancillary right at the EU level would have a strong negative impact on all stakeholders, including publishers, authors, journalists, researchers, online service providers, and readers. . . .

In the votes last week in the CULT and ITRE committees, the press publishers right was also carried through – and even expanded. Both of the recent opinions remove the restriction that the right applies to digital uses only, meaning that if adopted it would cover all uses—both digital and in print. Even worse, ITRE—the committee responsible for policy relating to the promotion of research—voted to extend the press publishers right to cover scientific publications.

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