Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher

Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 19th, 2017

Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail, LISTSERV, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal. Imagine that the latest mid-range PC has a 6 MHz 16/32-bit 80386SX processor, a 30 MB hard drive, and 2 MB of RAM and costs about $3,900.

That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list, after distributing some photocopied handouts at the ALA Annual meeting. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). PACS-L was sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries. Walt Crawford and Roy Tennant have shared their thoughts about PACS-L in "Talking About Public Access: PACS-L's First Decade" and "Remembering PACS-L."

In August 1989, I launched and began editing The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. It was published by the University of Houston Libraries. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. You can find a history of the journal and links to articles and reviews about it in "The Public-Access Computer Systems Review."

In 1996, I established and began writing the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book, which was published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats. It had 79 subsequent versions. This early e-book was published by the University of Houston Libraries until late 1996. My "Evolution of an Electronic Book: The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography" article recounts the history of the e-book through 2001.

In 2005, I established Digital Scholarship, and I began to write and publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. Since then, Digital Scholarship has published PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

Back in 1989, I never thought that a wacky idea and a few handouts would lead to 28 years of digital publishing projects.

You can find a complete chronology of my digital publishing activities in A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher.

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"What I Learned from Predatory Publishers"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 15th, 2017

Jeffrey Beall has published "What I Learned from Predatory Publishers" in Biochemia Medica.

Here's an excerpt:

This article is a first-hand account of the author’s work identifying and listing predatory publishers from 2012 to 2017. Predatory publishers use the gold (author pays) open access model and aim to generate as much revenue as possible, often foregoing a proper peer review. The paper details how predatory publishers came to exist and shows how they were largely enabled and condoned by the open-access social movement, the scholarly publishing industry, and academic librarians. The author describes tactics predatory publishers used to attempt to be removed from his lists, details the damage predatory journals cause to science, and comments on the future of scholarly publishing.

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"Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 8th, 2017

Darren B. Taichman et al. have published "Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors" in PLOS Medicine.

Here's an excerpt:

Therefore, ICMJE will require the following as conditions of consideration for publication of a clinical trial report in our member journals:

  1. As of July 1, 2018 manuscripts submitted to ICMJE journals that report the results of clinical trials must contain a data sharing statement as described below.
  2. Clinical trials that begin enrolling participants on or after January 1, 2019 must include a data sharing plan in the trial’s registration. The ICMJE's policy regarding trial registration is explained at www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/clinical-trial-registration.html. If the data sharing plan changes after registration this should be reflected in the statement submitted and published with the manuscript, and updated in the registry record.

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"Are Open Access Journals Immune from Piracy?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 7th, 2017

Angela Cochran has published "Are Open Access Journals Immune from Piracy?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Even though Sci-Hub is billed as providing access to paywalled content, there appear to be thousands of open access articles in the host database. Sci-Hub provided usage of their services from 2015 to Science news writer John Bohannon with the full data set. Reviewing just the data from December 2015, I found that over 200 users accessed PLOS ONE content, over 450 users accessed Hindawi content, and a whopping 2,145 users accessed BioMed Central content.

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"Detours and Diversions—Do Open Access Publishers Face New Barriers?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 1st, 2017

Kent Anderson has published "Detours and Diversions—Do Open Access Publishers Face New Barriers?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Analyzing their [Altmetric's] Top 100 articles for 2016 (data available here), 70% of the Top 100 articles were published behind paywalls. Given the preponderance of paywalled journals, it may be tempting to interpret a 30% rate of non-paywalled articles in the data as an indication that OA journals are punching above their weight, as they comprise only 18% of papers currently, according the best available estimate. Drilling into the data, however, tells a different story. Fully 1/3 of the articles in the Top 100 categorized by Altmetric as OA come from Gold OA journals from for-profit publishers (mainly Elsevier and SpringerNature), which suggests that for-profit publishers’ promotional practices may benefit the prominence of the content they publish.

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"Steady Growth of Articles in Fully OA Journals Using a CC-BY License"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 31st, 2017

OASPA has released "Steady Growth of Articles in Fully OA Journals Using a CC-BY License."

Here's an excerpt:

A total of 905,687 articles were published with the CC BY license in open access-only journals by members of OASPA during the period shown above [2000-2016], with 189,529 of those being published in 2016.

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Untangling Academic Publishing: A History of the Relationship between Commercial Interests, Academic Prestige and the Circulation of Research

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 31st, 2017

Aileen Fyfe et al. have self-archived "Untangling Academic Publishing: A History of the Relationship between Commercial Interests, Academic Prestige and the Circulation of Research."

Here's an excerpt:

This briefing paper aims to provide a historical perspective that can inform the debates about what the future of academic publishing should look like We argue that current policy regarding open access publishing, and many of the other proposals for the reform of academic publishing, have been too focused on the opportunities and financial challenges of the most recent changes in digital communications technologies and have given undue weight to commercial concerns.

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Knowledge Exchange Consensus on Monitoring Open Access Publications and Cost Data

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on May 18th, 2017

The Knowledge Exchange has released Knowledge Exchange Consensus on Monitoring Open Access Publications and Cost Data .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report gives a great deal of detail on the presentations from the different countries, as well as the keynote address from Stuart Lawson on the true costs of publishing, which coincides significantly with the excellent work he and Katie Shamash have done with the Total Cost of Ownership project in Jisc Collections. In addition, Kai Geschuhn from the Max Planck Digital Library spoke about the idea of moving from offsetting deals to pay-as-you-publish; Rachel Lammey discussed CrossREF and open access meta-data; and Graham Stone, from Jisc, focused on collecting information on APC cost data.

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"Journal Publishers’ Big Deals: Are They Worth It?"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on May 12th, 2017

Stéphani Gagnon has self-archived "Journal Publishers' Big Deals: Are They Worth It?."

Here's an excerpt:

Following the initial Wiley's unbundling based on quantitative indicators, Université de Montréal refined its analysis methodology to incorporate qualitative indicators; i.e., the voice of its community. That methodology allowed identification of 5,893 periodicals deemed essential out of a possible 50,000 subscriptions. We realized that, at best, barely more than a third of the periodicals included in most Big Deals are truly of use.

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"Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2017

Meg Byrne has published "Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE" in the EveryONE Blog

Here's an excerpt:

PLOS ONE has published over 65,000 papers with a DAS in the three years since the open data policy was put in place. We were initially concerned we would not be able to consider a significant number of submissions because authors could not share data, but this did not turn out to be the case. Since the implementation of the updated policy, we estimate staff have rejected less than 0.1% of submissions due to authors’ unwillingness or inability to share data. What we have seen is a growing acceptance of data sharing and evolution of data sharing practices. For instance, there has been a steady growth in datasets available directly via public data repositories such as the NCBI databases, Figshare or Dryad. While the proportion of articles with a data availability statement linking to one of these repositories is still relatively low, at around 20% in 2016, the growth is encouraging.

Another 60% of articles include data in the main text and supplementary information. While we strongly recommend discipline-specific open repositories where they exist, we also deposit the supporting information files, figures, and tables included with every article to Figshare and give each of these its own DOI. Thus, in addition to being available via the PLOS ONE article, this content is also available through an external data repository. The remaining 20% of papers have data available upon request due to restrictions acceptable under our policy, including restrictions related to sensitive data or because the data are owned by and available from a third party.

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"From the Ground Up: A Group Editorial on the Most Pressing Issues in Scholarly Communication"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on May 10th, 2017

Nicky Agate et. al have published "From the Ground Up: A Group Editorial on the Most Pressing Issues in Scholarly Communication" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

There has been quite a bit of discussion lately about the future of scholarly communication in libraries (for an example, see Clifford Lynch's guest editorial in the February issue of C&RL), and we wanted to give our board a chance to weigh in. They were asked to share their take on the most pressing issues in scholarly communication today, in their capacity as Editorial Board members (rather than as representatives of their respective institutions), and the following six short pieces are the result.

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A System That Prioritises Publications Means Early Career Researchers’ Scholarly Attitudes and Behaviours Remain Conservative

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 10th, 2017

Dave Nicholas has published "A System That Prioritises Publications Means Early Career Researchers' Scholarly Attitudes and Behaviours Remain Conservative" in the LSE Impact Blog.

Here's an excerpt:

Reporting the first-year findings of a longitudinal study of an international panel of ECRs, Dave Nicholas reveals that many remain conservative in their scholarly attitudes and practices. ECRs are concerned by "risky" open peer review, regard archiving their work in repositories as a non-priority, and display little interest in open science or altmetrics. Many ECRs see opportunities for change, but do not feel able to grasp them as they are shackled to a reputational system that promotes publication record and citation scores above all else.

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