Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"’Total Cost of Ownership’ of Scholarly Communication: Managing Subscription and APC Payments Together"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 28th, 2015

Stuart Lawson has self-archived "'Total Cost of Ownership' of Scholarly Communication: Managing Subscription and APC Payments Together."

Here's an excerpt:

Managing subscription journals and open access charges together has created challenges which may in part be dealt with by offsetting the two revenue streams against each other. In order to do this, it is necessary to have reliable financial data about the extent of the two interacting markets. Jisc Collections has been undertaking data collection regarding universities' article publication charge (APC) expenditure. This process is difficult without a standardized way of recording data, so Jisc Collections has developed a standard data collection template and is helping institutions to release data openly. If available data become more comprehensive and transparent, then all parties (libraries, publishers, research funders, and intermediaries) will have better knowledge of the APC market and can more accurately predict the effects of offsetting.

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    "Journal Subscription Expenditure of UK Higher Education Institutions, Version 3″

    Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on July 27th, 2015

    Stuart Lawson and Ben Meghreblian have published "Journal Subscription Expenditure of UK Higher Education Institutions, Version 3." in F1000Research.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs) pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 153 HEIs' expenditure with ten publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

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      "SHARE Community Stakeholders Convene Working Meeting in Washington, DC"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 27th, 2015

      SHARE has released "SHARE Community Stakeholders Convene Working Meeting in Washington, DC."

      Here's an excerpt:

      Accomplishments since the first SHARE Community Meeting in October 2014 include the DuraSpace webinar series, launch of the share-research.org website and the SHARE Notify beta, and surpassing the milestone of one million research release events included in SHARE Notify. Currently in the works are partnerships with IRIS [http://iris.isr.umich.edu/] and ORCID and a pending grant proposal to fund Phase II of SHARE.

      See also: "SHARE Community Meeting, Summer 2015."

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        "Emerald Group Publishing Tests ZEN, Increases Prices: What Does It Mean?"

        Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 23rd, 2015

        Richard Poynder has published "Emerald Group Publishing Tests ZEN, Increases Prices: What Does It Mean?" in Open and Shut?

        Here's an excerpt:

        So why has Emerald chosen to trial ZEN [Zero Embargo Now] with some of it library journals, what role did the LAG play in the decision, and what do members of the LAG feel about the associated 70% increase in the APCs of 32 engineering and technology journals?

        In the hope of finding out I emailed Emerald and asked where I could find a list of advisory group members. It turns out that these are not publicly available.

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          Scopus Will Include Open Access Indicator for Indexed Journals

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 22nd, 2015

          As of July 29, Scopus will include an open access indicator for indexed journals.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          Out of the +21,000 active journals indexed in Scopus, 3,785 are currently (June 2015) registered as Open Access (OA) journals. . . .

          In Scopus, journals are registered as being OA journals only if they are registered as Gold OA or Subsidized OA at one or both of the following sources: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD).

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            "Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology"

            Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 22nd, 2015

            Ronald D Vale has self-archived "Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past thirty years. Considerably more experimental data is now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of Ph.D. training. Since publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for the life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and scientific community.

            See also: "Thoughts on Ron Vale's 'Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology'" by Michael Eisen.

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              Who Needs Open Access? Greek Academic Libraries Do

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 21st, 2015

              The Hellenic Academic Libraries Link (HEAL-Link) has ended its contracts with all e-journal publishers due to the financial crisis.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement (news item link scrolls on banner):

              HEAL-Link informs you of the termination of the agreements with all publishers as of 01.07.2015 due to the inability to collect the remaining half of the budget for the current year, despite the efforts that have been made and are continued, in cooperation with the Board of Rectors and the Ministry of Education. A

              See also: "Greek Scientists Lose Access to Digital Journals."

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                Emerald Announces Zero Embargo Trial for Library and Information Science Journals

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 15th, 2015

                Emerald has announced a zero embargo trial for library and information science journals.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                Emerald Group Publishing, global publisher linking research and practice, today announces the launch of its Green Open Access, Zero Embargo trial, applicable for all mandated articles submitted to the company's Library and Information Science (LIS) and selected Information and Knowledge Management journals.

                This change allows authors to deposit the post-print version of the article into their respective institutional repository immediately upon official publication, rather than after Emerald's 24 month embargo period for mandated articles. . . .

                The evaluation of this trial will help to inform future Emerald Open Access initiatives. Emerald will work with its Librarian Advisory Group to assess the impact of the trial, by monitoring the quality and volume of submissions, feedback from authors, and readership figures from both the Emerald platform and institutional repositories.

                See also: "Emerald and Open Access."

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                  "Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 9th, 2015

                  LSE Impact of Social Sciences has released "Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?."

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Led by vice chancellors, Dutch universities have recently announced plans for a country-wide boycott of the academic publisher Elsevier. This boycott has the potential to be a significant game changer in the relationship between the research community and the world's largest academic publisher. But how will it affect open access momentum in the UK and around the world? Here we have brought together two expert views on the subject. Danny Kingsley, the Head of Scholarly Communication at University of Cambridge and Steven Harnad, longtime advocate for open access, share their views on what the Dutch boycott can hope to achieve.

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                    "Dutch Boycott of Elsevier—A Game Changer?"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 7th, 2015

                    Danny Kingsley has published "Dutch Boycott of Elsevier—A Game Changer?" in Unlocking Research.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    A long running dispute between Dutch universities and Elsevier has taken an interesting turn. Yesterday Koen Becking, chairman of the Executive Board of Tilburg University who has been negotiating with scientific publishers about an open access policy on behalf of Dutch universities with his colleague Gerard Meijer, announced a plan to start boycotting Elsevier.

                    As a first step in boycotting the publisher, the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) has asked all scientists that are editor in chief of a journal published by Elsevier to give up their post. If this way of putting pressure on the publishers does not work, the next step would be to ask reviewers to stop working for Elsevier. After that, scientists could be asked to stop publishing in Elsevier journals. . . .

                    The 2015 Dutch boycott is significant. Typically negotiations with publishers occur at an institutional level and with representatives from the university libraries. This makes sense as libraries have long standing relationships with publishers and understand the minutiae of the licencing processes . However the Dutch negotiations have been led by the Vice Chancellors of the universities. It is a country-wide negotiation at the highest level. And Vice Chancellors have the ability to request behaviour change of their research communities.

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                      Public Knowledge Project Announces Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 6th, 2015

                      Public Knowledge Project has announced its Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      The Public Knowledge Project is pleased to announce the launch of the Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study. This two-year initiative, in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and other important stakeholders, will explore the feasibility of establishing publishing cooperatives that bring together libraries, journals, scholarly societies, presses, and others as a financially sustainable open access model for peer-reviewed scholarly publishing. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is providing a grant of $460,000 to support the project.

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                        "The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era"

                        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 3rd, 2015

                        Vincent Larivière et al. have published "The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era" in PLOS ONE.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        The consolidation of the scientific publishing industry has been the topic of much debate within and outside the scientific community, especially in relation to major publishers' high profit margins. However, the share of scientific output published in the journals of these major publishers, as well as its evolution over time and across various disciplines, has not yet been analyzed. This paper provides such analysis, based on 45 million documents indexed in the Web of Science over the period 1973-2013. It shows that in both natural and medical sciences (NMS) and social sciences and humanities (SSH), Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, and Taylor & Francis increased their share of the published output, especially since the advent of the digital era (mid-1990s). Combined, the top five most prolific publishers account for more than 50% of all papers published in 2013. Disciplines of the social sciences have the highest level of concentration (70% of papers from the top five publishers), while the humanities have remained relatively independent (20% from top five publishers). NMS disciplines are in between, mainly because of the strength of their scientific societies, such as the ACS in chemistry or APS in physics. The paper also examines the migration of journals between small and big publishing houses and explores the effect of publisher change on citation impact. It concludes with a discussion on the economics of scholarly publishing.

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