Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

CERN and APS Announce Open Access Partnership

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 19th, 2014

American Physical Society and The European Organization for Nuclear Research have formed a partnership to make CERN-authored articles published in APS journals open access.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

Articles in APS' Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C in 2015 and 2016 will be covered by this agreement.

Thanks to this partnership, articles will be available free of charge for everyone to read. Copyright will remain with the authors and permissive Creative Commons CC-BY licences will allow re-use of the information (e.g. in books, review articles, conference proceedings and teaching material) as well as text- and data-mining applications.

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    "The Need for Research Data Inventories and the Vision for SHARE"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 18th, 2014

    Clifford Lynch has published "The Need for Research Data Inventories and the Vision for SHARE" in Information Standards Quarterly.

    Here's an excerpt:

    There is a major movement calling for public access to the results of funded research, both in the US and globally. In parallel with these developments has been a growing focus on the importance of research data management across all fields of scholarship- essentially the idea that appropriate stewardship of data used in or arising from research is essential to preserving, communicating, and replicating scholarship. SHARE (Shared Access Research Ecosystem) is a joint project of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the two key higher education presidential associations, the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU); ARL, with generous grant funding from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation and the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), is leading the implementation effort. This article briefly summarize the potential role of SHARE in the overall scheme of managing research data, with some emphasis on the importance of standards (both existing and to be developed) for making this vision a reality.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "Who Publishes in Top-Tier Library Science Journals? An Analysis by Faculty Status and Tenure"

      Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on August 29th, 2014

      Quinn Galbraith, Elizabeth Smart, Sara D. Smith and Megan Reed have published "Who Publishes in Top-Tier Library Science Journals? An Analysis by Faculty Status and Tenure" in College & Research Libraries.

      Here's an excerpt:

      This study analyzes the status and background of authors publishing in high-impact library science journals. Twenty-three high-impact journals were selected in this study by both quantitative and qualitative measures, while the analysis of author background focuses on whether the author holds a faculty status position with a tenure track. This study finds that 76 percent of academic librarians have faculty status.

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        "The Big Picture: Scholarly Publishing Trends 2014"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 26th, 2014

        Pippa Smart has published "The Big Picture: Scholarly Publishing Trends 2014" in Science Editing.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Technical solutions have attempted to address the growth in research but have sometimes added to the tsunami of information and increased the need to manage quality. To this end experiments with the traditional quality control and dissemination systems have been attempted, but news of improvements are frequently overshadowed by alarms about ethical problems. There is particular concern about some of the new publishers who are not adhering to established quality control and ethical practices. Within a potentially fragmenting system, however, there are also emerging collaborative projects helping to knit together the different elements of the publishing landscape to improve quality, linkages and access.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          eLife Research Advances Allows Authors to Update Their Papers

          Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 19th, 2014

          eLife has announced Research Advances, which allows authors to update their papers.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          The new article format, which we have named Research Advances, is for new results that build on previously published Research Articles or Short Reports in an important way. Authors will therefore be able to report progress in their research programs rapidly and efficiently when it is judged to be a substantial addition to the original work. These contributions might use a new technique or a different experimental design to generate results that strengthen, refine or even challenge the conclusions of the original research paper.

          On a historical note, the University of Houston Libraries' e-journal The Public-Access Computer Systems Review began to offer authors the option of updating articles in 1995. For example, the 1995 "The Heinz Electronic Library Interactive Online System (HELIOS): Building a Digital Archive Using Imaging, OCR, and Natural Language Processing Technologies" and the 1998 "The Heinz Electronic Library Interactive Online System (HELIOS): An Update."

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            "Implementing CHORUS: Big Decisions Loom for Publishers"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 10th, 2014

            Angela Cochran has published "Implementing CHORUS: Big Decisions Loom for Publishers" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The implementation is not without complications. Publishers need to make some pretty serious decisions on how to proceed. The biggest decision may be exactly what to expose in order to comply with any forthcoming public access mandates. The options are to make the accepted manuscripts (AM) publicly available for papers derived from federal funds or to allow access to the final PDF or version of record (VoR). Either is acceptable under federal requirements.

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              SCOAP3 Has Published 2,000 Articles

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 3rd, 2014

              The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) has published 2,000 articles.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              Two thousand Open Access articles have been published with SCOAP3 funding since January 2014 in 10 journals from 11 publishers and learned societies. These articles are released under a CC-BY license, and openly accessible on publishers websites. In addition, articles are also immediately available on the SCOAP3 repository at repo.scoap3.org in several formats, including PDF/A and XML for text-mining and other purposes. Scientists from over 80 countries have freely published in SCOAP journals so far.

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                Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey June 2014

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 1st, 2014

                Taylor & Francis has released the Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey June 2014.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                In the first few months of 2014 Taylor & Francis carried out a worldwide survey, with the aim of exploring journal authors' views on open access.

                Having previously conducted a survey on open access in 2013, we have been able to see how authors' opinions have developed, and whether the discussion and debate on open access has helped to inform and shape views.

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                  "The Subversive Proposal at 20"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 1st, 2014

                  Richard Poynder has published "The Subversive Proposal at 20" in Open and Shut?

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Twenty years ago yesterday, cognitive scientist Stevan Harnad posted a message on a mailing list, a message he headed "A Subversive Proposal." This called on all researchers to make copies of the papers they published in scholarly journals freely available on the Internet. . . .

                  To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Subversive Proposal, I emailed Harnad nine questions yesterday. These questions are published below, with Harnad's answers attached.

                  Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                    "Can Libraries Help Stop this Madness?"

                    Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on June 27th, 2014

                    Kevin L. Smith has published "Can Libraries Help Stop this Madness?" in Library Journal.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    If university presses can make a successful transition to less-expensive digital publishing, we should support that transition as fully as we can, but we should withhold funds where the digital product reflects the high prices and other inefficiencies mandated by print.

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                      "The Price of Big Science: Saturation or Abundance in Scientific Publishing?"

                      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on June 25th, 2014

                      Caroline S. Wagner and Dae Joong Kim have published "The Price of Big Science: Saturation or Abundance in Scientific Publishing?" in Policy and Complex Systems.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The rate of production of scientific publications appears to be continuing on an exponential growth curve against the prediction of Derek de Solla Price. (This article examines only publications, but it has been noted that scientific data (Borgman, Wallis, and Enyedy 2007) and e-Science (Hey and Trefethen 2005) are also growing phenomena, as well.) The growth of scientific publications has many possible causes, but the system itself appears to be operating efficiently. The networked nature of global science (Wagner and Leydesdorff 2005), the expansion of source materials and venues, the expansion of the practice of science to new places, the application of science to new problems (such as climate change), and the rise of China as a scientific power all may be contributing to the very rapid growth in output, increasing the complexity of the system.

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                        "The Multidimensional Assessment of Scholarly Research Impact"

                        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on June 24th, 2014

                        Henk F. Moed and Gali Halevi have self-archived "The Multidimensional Assessment of Scholarly Research Impact."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        This article introduces the Multidimensional Research Assessment Matrix of scientific output. Its base notion holds that the choice of metrics to be applied in a research assessment process depends upon the unit of assessment, the research dimension to be assessed, and the purposes and policy context of the assessment. An indicator may by highly useful within one assessment process, but less so in another. For instance, publication counts are useful tools to help discriminating between those staff members who are research active, and those who are not, but are of little value if active scientists are to be compared one another according to their research performance. This paper gives a systematic account of the potential usefulness and limitations of a set of 10 important metrics including altmetrics, applied at the level of individual articles, individual researchers, research groups and institutions. It presents a typology of research impact dimensions, and indicates which metrics are the most appropriate to measure each dimension. It introduces the concept of a meta-analysis of the units under assessment in which metrics are not used as tools to evaluate individual units, but to reach policy inferences regarding the objectives and general setup of an assessment process.

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