Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"The OA Interviews: Alison Mudditt, Director, University of California Press"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on March 9th, 2015

Richard Poynder has published "The OA Interviews: Alison Mudditt, Director, University of California Press" in Open and Shut? in which Mudditt discusses the UC Press' Collabra and Luminos open access programs.

Here's an excerpt:

Collabra's model speaks to publishers, libraries, funders, and researchers who are seeking more cost transparency and greater recognition of the critical role that the academic and scientific community plays in journal publishing. In our model, the people who do the fundamental work of peer-review are recognized for this and are able to decide where to place that value.

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    You Didn’t Think It Was Over, Did You? New Motion in GSU Copyright Case

    Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on March 9th, 2015

    According to "Publishers' Move Could Mean 'Whole New Trial' in GSU Copyright Case," the plaintiffs have filed a motion to "reopen the trial record, and have asked that new evidence be used to determine whether some of the university's online e-reserve course readings are infringing copyright."

    The article also mentions a recent e-print by Brandon Butler, "Transformative Teaching and Educational Fair Use after Georgia State."

    Here's an excerpt from the e-print:

    The latest installment in the history of educational fair use, the 11th Circuit's opinion in the Georgia State e-reserves case, may be the last judicial word on the subject for years to come, and I argue that its import is primarily in its rejection of outdated guidelines and case law, rather than any affirmative vision of fair use (which the court studiously avoids). Because of the unique factual context of the case, it stops short of bridging the gap between educational fair use and modern transformative use jurisprudence. With help from recent scholarship on broad patterns in fair use caselaw, I pick up where the GSU court left off, describing a variety of common educational uses that are categorizable as transformative, and therefore entitled to broad deference under contemporary fair use doctrine. In the process, I show a way forward for vindicating fair use rights, and first amendment rights, by applying the transformative use concept at lower levels of abstraction to help practice communities make sense of the doctrine.

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      "Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 6th, 2015

      Peter Kraker et al. have self-archived "Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare."

      Here's an excerpt:

      In this paper, we present an analysis of figshare, one of the largest multidisciplinary repositories for research materials to date. We analysed the structure of items archived in figshare, their usage, and their reception in two altmetrics sources (PlumX and ImpactStory). We found that figshare acts as a platform for newly published research materials, and as an archive for PLOS. Depending on the function, we found different bibliometric characteristics. Items archived from PLOS tend to be coming from the natural sciences and are often unviewed and non-downloaded. Self-archived items, however, come from a variety of disciplines and exhibit some patterns of higher usage. In the altmetrics analysis, we found that Twitter was the social media service where research data gained most attention; generally, research data published in 2014 were most popular across social media services. PlumX detects considerably more items in social media and also finds higher altmetric scores than ImpactStory.

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        "Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 5th, 2015

        Alice Meadows has published "Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access" in The Scholarly Kitchen .

        Here's an excerpt:

        The question of whether—and, if so, when and how—to 'flip' a traditional, subscription-based journal to open access (OA) is one that comes up time and again in meetings with our society partners. It's also something that funders sometimes like to suggest as a quick route to a more open world—"Why not just convert all your journals to OA?" they ask.

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          "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 2nd, 2015

          Michael J. Ackerman has published "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing" in The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Interactive Scientific Publishing (ISP) has been developed by the Optical Society of America with support from the National Library of Medicine at NIH. It allows authors to electronically publish papers which are linked to the referenced 2D and 3D original image datasets. These image datasets can then be viewed and analyzed interactively by the reader. ISP provides the software for authors to assemble and link their source data to their publication. But more important is that it provides readers with image viewing and analysis tools. The goal of ISP is to improve learning and understanding of the presented information. This paper describes ISP and its effect on learning and understanding. ISP was shown to have enough educational value that readers were willing to invest in the required set-up and learning phases. The social aspects of data sharing and the enlarged review process may be the hardest obstacles to overcome.

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            "AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research"

            Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 23rd, 2015

            ARL has released AHRQ, NASA, USDA Release Plans for Public Access to Funded Research.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Three US Government agencies-the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)-recently released their plans for increasing public access to federally funded research in response to the 2013 White House Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP) directive. The OSTP memorandum directed federal agencies with R&D budgets of $100 million or more to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication.

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              "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 10th, 2015

              Heather Morrison et al. have published "Open Access Article Processing Charges: DOAJ Survey May 2014" in Publications.

              Here's an excerpt:

              As of May 2014, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) listed close to ten thousand fully open access, peer reviewed, scholarly journals. Most of these journals do not charge article processing charges (APCs). This article reports the results of a survey of the 2567 journals, or 26% of journals listed in DOAJ, that do have APCs based on a sample of 1432 of these journals. Results indicate a volatile sector that would make future APCs difficult to predict for budgeting purposes. DOAJ and publisher title lists often did not closely match. A number of journals were found on examination not to have APCs. A wide range of publication costs was found for every publisher type. The average (mean) APC of $964 contrasts with a mode of $0. At least 61% of publishers using APCs are commercial in nature, while many publishers are of unknown types. The vast majority of journals charging APCs (80%) were found to offer one or more variations on pricing, such as discounts for authors from mid to low income countries, differential pricing based on article type, institutional or society membership, and/or optional charges for extras such as English language editing services or fast track of articles. The complexity and volatility of this publishing landscape is discussed.

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                "A Proposal for Regularly Updated Review/Survey Articles: ‘Living Reviews’"

                Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2015

                David L. Mobley and Daniel M. Zuckerman have self-archived "A Proposal for Regularly Updated Review/Survey Articles: 'Living Reviews'."

                Here's an excerpt:

                We propose and encourage the publication of review/survey articles that will be updated regularly, both in traditional journals and novel venues. We call these "living reviews." This idea naturally builds on the dissemination and archival capabilities present in the modern internet, and indeed living reviews exist already in some forms. Living review articles allow authors to maintain over time the relevance of non-research scholarship that requires a significant investment of effort. We also envision living reviews leading to the creation of a new category of review—review papers published as living reviews in a purely electronic format without space constraints. This will also permit more pedagogical scholarship and clearer treatment of technical issues that remain obscure in a brief treatment.

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                  "One More Chunk of DOAJ"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2015

                  Walt Crawford has published "One More Chunk of DOAJ" in Cites & Insights Crawford at Large.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Because there will be a published concise version of all this stuff—out this summer from ALA's Library Technology Reports, working title "Idealism and Opportunism: The State of Open Access Journals"—I went through 2,200-odd additional DOAJ journals with English as one of the language options (but not the first one), and was able to add 1,507 more entries to my DOAJ master spreadsheet, which now includes 6,490 journals qualifying for full analysis and 811 that don't. This essay offers some summary information on the 1,507 added journals and some overall notes on the full DOAJ set-including some new and replacement tables (there may be errors in tables 2.66 b and c and 2.67 b and c in earlier issues).

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                    "PeerJ—A PLOS ONE Contender in 2015?"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 2nd, 2015

                    Phil Davis has published "PeerJ—A PLOS ONE Contender in 2015?" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    In my last post, I reported that PeerJ was growing, publishing more papers and attracting more authors, although it was not clear whether the company was moving toward financial stability. In a crowded market of multidisciplinary open access journals, I argued that the success (or failure) of PeerJ would be determined when it received its first Impact Factor, which will be announced in mid-June with the publication of Thomson Reuters' Journal Citation Report. The purpose of this post is to estimate PeerJ's first Impact Factor and discuss its implications.

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                      "Ask The Chefs: What Do You Think Will Have the Biggest Impact on Scholarly Publishing In 2015?"

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 29th, 2015

                      Ann Michael has published "Ask the Chefs: What Do You Think Will Have The Biggest Impact on Scholarly Publishing In 2015" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      According to the Chefs, we're looking at a year of mergers and acquisitions, the continuing growth of open access both in number of opportunities and in scale, the publication of data and objects (like multimedia, application code, etc.), and more start-ups.

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                        SciELO: 15 Years of Open Access

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 28th, 2015

                        SciELO has released SciELO: 15 Years of Open Access.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        The creation of SciELO 15 years ago and its further development were driven by two innovative and pioneering approaches: first, the indexing of national quality journals to complement international indexes and the publication of the full texts with free access on the Web in the modality known today as the "Golden Road", which took place about four years before the launch of the Budapest Declaration that is internationally agreed to as the beginning of the Open Access movement; and, second, the cooperative convergence of independent publishers, editors and national research agencies around a common objective to increase the visibility and quality of journals (Packer 1998; Meneghini, 2003; Packer 2009). During this development, SciELO became a standard of quality for the journals it indexes. As of June 2013, the SciELO network covers 15 Ibero-American countries plus South Africa, with each country publishing a national collection of journals in the network. There are also two multinational thematic collections in the network. Together these countries index about one thousand journal titles that publish more than 40 thousand articles per year. To date, the network has published a total of more than 400 thousand open access articles that receive a daily average of over 1.5 million article downloads, 65% as PDF files and 35% as HTML files.

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