Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"Open Access Archivangelist: The Last Interview?"

Posted in Open Access, People in the News, Self-Archiving on July 14th, 2016

Otwartanauka.pl has released "Open Access Archivangelist: The Last Interview?."

Here's an excerpt:

It seems, however, that the long era of [Stevan] Harnad's 'Archivangelism' for Open Access is coming to an end. Earlier this year, 22 years after the 'Subversive Proposal', Harnad made it quite clear via Twitter that he is about to quit Open Access Advocacy.

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    "ACRL Issues Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians"

    Posted in Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on July 13th, 2016

    Kara Malenfant has published "ACRL Issues Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians" in ACRL Insider.

    Here's an excerpt:

    In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible.

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      "Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System"

      Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Self-Archiving on July 12th, 2016

      Philip Cohen has published "Developing SocArXiv—A New Open Archive of the Social Sciences to Challenge the Outdated Journal System" in LSE Impact.

      Here's an excerpt:

      But there remains a need for a new general, open-access, open-source, paper server for the social sciences, one that encourages linking and sharing data and code, that serves its research to an open metadata system, and that provides the foundation for a post-publication review system. I hope that SocArXiv will enable us to save research from the journal system. Once it's built, anyone will be able to use it to organize their own peer-review community, to select and publish papers (though not exclusively), to review and comment on each other's work – and to discover, cite, value, and share research unimpeded. We will be able to do this because of a partnership with the Center for Open Science (which is already developing a new preprint server) and SHARE ("a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle"). We are also supported by the University of Maryland, which hosts the initiative.

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        "Breaking Down Pros and Cons of Preprints in Biomedicine"

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 4th, 2016

        Hilda Bastian has published "Breaking Down Pros and Cons of Preprints in Biomedicine" in Absolutely Maybe.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The pros and cons on this are arguably different for physics and biomedicine. It might be easier to copy or fold in someone else's insights into an experiment or paper and beat them to press, so the argument goes. Perhaps this is in part a concern about losing out on a citation in a higher impact journal if your work is no longer seen as exciting. If it's a common concern, then it's a serious hurdle for preprint acceptance.

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          "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician"

          Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 21st, 2016

          Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician " in Open and Shut?.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The idea of arXiv overlay journals was in the air for a long time. I think one impulse behind Discrete Analysis was the very hostile reaction from many people to the setting up of the open access journal Forum of Mathematics by Cambridge University Press, which (after a three-year free period) charges £750 per article.

          It seems that a large proportion of mathematicians are implacably opposed to article processing charges, no matter what assurances are given that authors themselves will never be expected to pay out of their own pocket, and that ability to pay will not affect the choice of which articles to publish.

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            "Comparing Published Scientific Journal Articles to Their Pre-print Versions"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 21st, 2016

            Martin Klein et al. have self-archived "Comparing Published Scientific Journal Articles to Their Pre-print Versions."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Academic publishers claim that they add value to scholarly communications by coordinating reviews and contributing and enhancing text during publication. . . . We have investigated the publishers' value proposition by conducting a comparative study of pre-print papers and their final published counterparts. This comparison had two working assumptions: 1) if the publishers' argument is valid, the text of a pre-print paper should vary measurably from its corresponding final published version, and 2) by applying standard similarity measures, we should be able to detect and quantify such differences. Our analysis revealed that the text contents of the scientific papers generally changed very little from their pre-print to final published versions.

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              "The Academic, Economic and Societal Impacts of Open Access: An Evidence-Based Review"

              Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 14th, 2016

              Jonathan P. Tennant et al. have published an e-print for review of "The Academic, Economic and Societal Impacts of Open Access: An Evidence-Based Review" in F1000 Research.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This review presents published evidence of the impact of Open Access on the academy, economy and society. Overall, the evidence points to a favorable impact of OA on the scholarly literature through increased dissemination and reuse. OA has the potential to be a sustainable business venture for new and established publishers, and can provide substantial benefits to research- and development-intensive businesses, including health organisations, volunteer sectors, and technology. OA is a global issue, highlighted by inequalities beset at all levels between developing and developed nations, and largely fueled by financial inequality. Current levels of access in the developing world are insufficient and unstable, and only OA has the potential to foster the development of stable research ecosystems. While predatory publishing remains an ongoing issue, particularly in the developing world, increasing public engagement, development of OA policies, and discussion of sustainable and ethical publishing practices can remove this potential threat to OA.

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                University of Arizona Faculty Senate Passes Open Access Policy

                Posted in Open Access, Self-Archiving on April 6th, 2016

                The University of Arizona Faculty Senate has passed an open access policy.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                On April 4, 2016, the University of Arizona Faculty Senate passed an open access policy that calls on the faculty and university to distribute faculty-authored scholarly articles to the widest possible audience through the UA Campus Repository. The new policy was drafted by a faculty task force charged to "review how we as a faculty might act in order to expand access to our scholarly and research outputs."

                The task force put forward a framework largely on open access policies previously passed by faculty bodies at universities including Harvard, MIT, Duke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Penn State, Oregon State University, and the University of California system.

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                  "Open Access Publishing in Higher Education: Charting the Challenging Course to Academic and Financial Sustainability"

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 21st, 2016

                  Mark I. Greenberg has published "Open Access Publishing in Higher Education: Charting the Challenging Course to Academic and Financial Sustainability" in the Journal of Educational Controversy.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  The benefits, pitfalls, and sustainability of open access publishing are hotly debated. Commercial publishers dominate the marketplace and oppose alternative publishing models that threaten their bottom line. Scholars' use of open access remains relatively limited due to awareness and perceived benefits to their professional goals. Readership of open access publications is generally strong, but some people disagree that more readers leads to increased citations and research impact. Libraries have grown their influence by supporting and promoting open access, but these efforts come with significant financial costs. Today, open access has flourished most significantly as a philosophy: the belief that the world's scholarship should be freely available to readers and that publicly funded research, in particular, should be accessible to the taxpayers who paid for it.

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                    "Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories"

                    Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 9th, 2016

                    Nancy Pontika et al. have published "Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories" in Liber Quarterly.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The COnnecting REpositories (CORE) project has been dealing with these challenges by aggregating and enriching content from hundreds of open access repositories, increasing the discoverability and reusability of millions of open access manuscripts. As repository managers and library directors often wish to know the details of the content harvested from their repositories and keep a certain level of control over it, CORE is now facing the challenge of how to enable content providers to manage their content in the aggregation and control the harvesting process. In order to improve the quality and transparency of the aggregation process and create a two-way collaboration between the CORE project and the content providers, we propose the CORE Dashboard.

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                      "Beams of Particles and Papers. The Role of Preprint Archives in High Energy Physics"

                      Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 3rd, 2016

                      Alessandro Delfanti has self-archived "Beams of Particles and Papers. The Role of Preprint Archives in High Energy Physics."

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The role of preprint archives is also highlighted by the existence of viXra.org, arXiv's evil twin. This dissenting and independent archive, that mimics the appearance and functioning of the original one, is aimed at overcoming the forms of policing that keep undesired papers outside of arXiv. ViXra claims to be " truly open" and to serve "the whole scientific community." In fact, the review processes enforced by arXiv are seen as failing to meet the standards of openness preprint archives are supposed to live up to.

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                        "Coupling Pre-Prints and Post-Publication Peer Review for Fast, Cheap, Fair, and Effective Science Publishing"

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 12th, 2016

                        Michael Eisen and Leslie B. Vosshall have self-archived "Coupling Pre-Prints and Post-Publication Peer Review for Fast, Cheap, Fair, and Effective Science Publishing."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Pre-prints will be not be embraced by biomedical scientists until we stop treating them as "pre" anything, which suggests that a better "real" version is yet to come. Instead, pre-prints need to be accepted as formally published works. This can only happen if we first create and embrace systems to evaluate the quality and impact of, and appropriate audience for, these already published works.

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