Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"Student Embargoes within Institutional Repositories: Faculty Early Transparency Concerns"

Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on April 2nd, 2014

David Stern has published "Student Embargoes within Institutional Repositories: Faculty Early Transparency Concerns" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

Libraries encourage students to utilize Institutional Repositories (IRs) to house e-portfolios that demonstrate their skills and experiences. This is especially important for students when applying for jobs and admission into graduate schools. However, within the academic sphere there are legitimate reasons why some faculty-student collaboration efforts should not be documented and openly shared in institutional repositories. The need for the protection of ideas and processes prior to faculty publication can be in direct conflict with the intention for institutional repositories to promote the excellent efforts of students. This is certainly true in laboratory situations where details of experiments and research areas are guarded for the lifetime of the exploration process. Librarians must work with others to develop guidelines and educational programs that prepare all stakeholders for these new information release considerations. One outcome of such deliberations could be the development of mutually beneficial publication guidelines which protect sensitive details of research yet allow students to submit selective research documentation into an IR. The other extreme, with no agreed upon partial embargo scenarios, could result in the removal of students from sensitive collaborations. Given the need for scientific laboratories to utilize student workers, and the benefit of real research experiences for students, the academy must find a balanced solution to this inherent conflict situation.

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    University of California Selects Symplectic as Publication Harvesting System Vendor

    Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 4th, 2014

    The University of California has selected Symplectic as the vendor for a publication harvesting system.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The California Digital Library (CDL), in conjunction with University of California campus partners, has chosen Symplectic as the vendor to implement a publication harvesting system in support of the UC Open Access Policy, passed by the Academic Senate in July 2013.

    Symplectic's flagship product, Elements, will form the basis of a research information management system intended to simplify participation in UC's OA Policy by providing an efficient method for faculty to deposit their research into eScholarship, UC's institutional repository. This system holds great promise for dramatically increasing the rate of deposit of faculty publications in accordance with the policy.

    With a robust set of features that address the specific requirements of the UC OA Policy and the needs of UC authors, Elements will closely monitor publication sources, including public and licensed publication indexes, for any new materials published by UC authors. Once a new publication is detected in the indexes, the system will collect as much information about that publication as possible and contact the author(s) by email for confirmation and manuscript upload. Author-approved publications will then be automatically submitted to eScholarship, where they will be openly available to the public.

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      "Setting the Record Straight about Elsevier"

      Posted in Copyright, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on January 29th, 2014

      Kevin Smith has published "Setting the Record Straight about Elsevier" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Each [article] version is a revision of the original, and the copyright is the same for all these derivatives. When copyright is transferred to a publisher, the rights in the entire set of versions, as derivatives of one another, are included in the transfer. Authors are not allowed to use their post-prints because the rights in that version are not covered in the transfer; they are allowed to use post-prints only because the right to do so, in specified situations, is licensed back to them as part of the publication agreement.

      Once a copyright transfer has been signed, all of the rights that the author may still have are because of specific contractual terms, which are usually contained in the transfer document itself. In short, these agreements usually give all of the rights under copyright to the publisher and then license back very small, carefully defined slivers of those rights back to the author. One of those slivers is often, but not always, the right to use a submitted version, or post-print, in carefully limited ways.

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        "Cultures of Access: Differences in Rhetoric around Open Access Repositories in Africa and the United States and Their Implications for the Open Access Movement"

        Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on December 5th, 2013

        Natalia T. Bowdoin has self-archived "Cultures of Access: Differences in Rhetoric around Open Access Repositories in Africa and the United States and Their Implications for the Open Access Movement."

        Here's an excerpt:

        For this study I examined the rhetoric used by OA institutional repositories and what this rhetoric may say about different "cultures of OA." I conducted textual analysis of 46 websites of OA repositories in the United States and 14 Sub-Saharan African nations. Analysis of the specific rhetoric used to present the OA repositories reveals differing views on the importance of OA in terms of cultural ideas about information control, access to information, and social capital.

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          "PeerJ—A Case Study in Improving Research Collaboration at the Journal Level"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on December 4th, 2013

          Peter Binfield has published "PeerJ—A Case Study in Improving Research Collaboration at the Journal Level" in the latest issue of Information Services & Use.

          Here's an excerpt:

          PeerJ Inc. is the Open Access publisher of PeerJ (a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal) and PeerJ PrePrints (an un-peer-reviewed or collaboratively reviewed preprint server), both serving the biological, medical and health sciences.

          The Editorial Criteria of PeerJ (the journal) are similar to those of PLOS ONE in that all submissions are judged only on their scientic and methodological soundness (not on subjective determinations of impact, or degree of advance). PeerJ's peer-review process is managed by an Editorial Board of 800 and an Advisory Board of 20 (including 5 Nobel Laureates).

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            "Green Open Access Policies of Scholarly Journal Publishers: A Study of What, When, and Where Self-Archiving Is Allowed"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 2nd, 2013

            Bo-Christer Björk, et al. have self-archived "Green Open Access Policies of Scholarly Journal Publishers: A Study of What, When, and Where Self-Archiving Is Allowed."

            Here's an excerpt:

            The degree to which scholarly journal articles published in subscription-based journals could be provided open access (OA) through publisher-permitted uploading to freely accessible web locations, so called green OA, is an underexplored area of research. This study combines article volume data originating from the Scopus bibliographic database with manually coded publisher policies of the 100 largest journal publishers measured by article output volume for the year 2010. Of the 1,1 million articles included in the analysis, 80.4% could be uploaded either as an accepted manuscript or publisher version to an institutional or subject repository after one year of publication. Publishers were found to be substantially more permissive with allowing accepted manuscripts on personal webpages (78.1% of articles) or in institutional repositories (79.9%) compared to subject repositories (32.8%). With previous studies suggesting realized green OA to be around 12% of total annual articles the results highlight the substantial unused potential for green OA.

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              Open Access Clauses in Publishers’ Licenses: Current State and Lessons Learned

              Posted in Copyright, Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 28th, 2013

              COAR has released Open Access Clauses in Publishers' Licenses: Current State and Lessons Learned.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              As Open Access (OA) policies and laws are being adopted world-wide, the scholarly community is shifting its efforts from advocacy towards practical implementation and support. One of the major routes for making articles open access is through OA repositories. However the variety and lack of clarity of publishers' policies regarding article deposit can be a significant barrier to author compliance of OA policies.

              In order to overcome this barrier, some organizations have successfully negotiated authors' or deposit rights with publishers in the context of purchasing content licenses. This report documents the existing OA licensing language that has been implemented by organizations around the world and presents some suggestions for their successful adoption. The report concludes that OA clauses offer a feasible option for institutions to address some of the obstacles to article deposit into repositories.

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                Green OA Needed in UK: Open Access: Fifth Report of Session 2013-14

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on September 11th, 2013

                The House of Commons Business, Innovation and Skills Committee has released Open Access: Fifth Report of Session 2013-14.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                The Government's commitment to increasing access to published research findings, and its desire to achieve full open access, are welcome, says the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee in a Report published today. However, whilst Gold open access is a desirable ultimate goal, focusing on it during the transition to a fully open access world is a mistake, says the Report.

                The Report calls on the Government and RCUK to reconsider their preference for Gold open access during the five year transition period, and give due regard to the evidence of the vital role that Green open access and repositories have to play as the UK moves towards full open access.

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