Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"SSRN and Law Journals—Rivals or Allies?"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on February 15th, 2013 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Ian Ramsay has self-archived "SSRN and Law Journals—Rivals or Allies?" in SSRN.

Here's an excerpt:

The author identifies and evaluates the respective merits of publication in law journals and publication on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN)—the largest open access repository for legal scholarship. This evaluation leads to the conclusion that at this stage of the evolution of law journals and SSRN, there are advantages in authors publishing both in journals and on SSRN. However, publication on SSRN can have particular advantages for authors in smaller countries.

| Reviews of Digital Scholarship Publications | Digital Scholarship |

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Open Access: Presentations from the Academy of Social Sciences’ Implementing Finch Conference Published

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on February 8th, 2013 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Academy of Social Sciences has released a Professional Briefings issue that contains the presentations from its two-day Implementing Finch conference.

Here's an excerpt:

Moving to the recommendations, Dame Janet wished to correct some misunderstandings. The main recommendation was for a mixed economy including both the 'author pays' and subscription models of publishing. The report did not recommend a rapid move to Gold open access ('author pays') and anticipated a mixed economy for the foreseeable future. However the report did recommend that the policy direction should be set towards Gold open access and envisaged the balance between the two models of publishing would shift over time.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography (paperback, PDF file, and XHTML website; over 1,100 entries) | Digital Scholarship |

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MedOANet Releases Open Access Tracker

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 12th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

MedOANet has released the Open Access Tracker.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

MedOANet (Mediterranean Open Access Network) is a two-year project funded under the Science in Society Programme of the EC 7th Framework Programme. The project enhances existing policies, strategies and structures for Open Access and contributes towards the implementation of new ones in six Mediterranean countries: Greece, Turkey, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal. . . .

The Open Access Tracker brings together information on journals, repositories, institutional policies, funder's policies and publishers' self-archiving policies, representing Open Access activities in the six countries.

Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals Cover

| Digital Scholarship |

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General Cost Analysis for Scholarly Communication in Germany: Results of the "Houghton Report" for Germany

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 3rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Goethe University has released General Cost Analysis for Scholarly Communication in Germany: Results of the "Houghton Report" for Germany.

Here's an excerpt:

This analysis of the potential benefits of more open access to research findings suggests that different publishing models can make a material difference to the benefits realised, as well as the costs faced. It seems likely that more Open Access would have substantial net benefits in the longer term and, while net benefits may be lower during a transitional period, they are likely to be positive for both 'author-pays' Open Access publishing and the 'over-lay journals' alternatives ('Gold Open Access'), and for parallel subscription publishing and self-archiving ('Green Open Access'). The NLP returns substantial benefits and savings at a modest cost, returning one of the highest benefit/cost ratios available from unilateral national policies during a transitional period (second to that of 'Green Open Access' self-archiving). Whether 'Green Open Access' self-archiving in parallel with subscriptions is a sustainable model over the longer term is debateable, and what impact the NLP may have on the take up of Open Access alternatives is also an important consideration. So too is the potential for developments in Open Access or other scholarly publishing business models to significantly change the relative cost-benefit of the NLP over time.

Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals Cover

| Digital Scholarship |

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Harvard School of Public Health Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on December 3rd, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Harvard School of Public Health has adopted an open access policy. It is the eighth Harvard school to do so.

Here's an excerpt:

Each Faculty member grants to the President and Fellows of Harvard College permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles. More specifically, each Faculty member grants to the President and Fellows a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit, and to authorize others to do the same. The policy applies to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while the person is a member of the Faculty except for any articles completed before the adoption of this policy and any articles for which the Faculty member entered into an incompatible licensing or assignment agreement before the adoption of this policy. The Dean or Dean's designate will waive application of the license for a particular article or delay access for a specified period of time upon express direction by a Faculty member.

Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography Cover

| Digital Scholarship | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

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Georgia Institute of Technology Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on November 30th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Georgia Institute of Technology has adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt:

Each Faculty member grants to Georgia Tech Research Corporation (hereinafter "GTRC") nonexclusive permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles for the purpose of open dissemination. In legal terms, each Faculty member grants to GTRC a nonexclusive, irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide license to exercise any and all copyrights in his or her scholarly articles published in any medium, provided the articles are not sold or licensed for a profit by GTRC or any GTRC-granted licensee.

This policy applies to all published scholarly articles that any person authors or co-authors while appointed as a member of the Faculty, except for any such articles authored or co-authored before the adoption of this policy, or subject to a conflicting agreement formed before the adoption of this policy, or conducted under a classified research agreement. Upon notification by the author, the Provost or Provost's designate will waive application of this license for a particular article. At author request, access will be delayed for up to one year.

To assist in distributing the scholarly articles, each Faculty member will make available an electronic copy of his or her final version of the article at no charge to a designated representative of the Provost's Office in appropriate formats (such as PDF) specified by the Provost’s Office, no later than the date of publication.

| Digital Scholarship | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography |

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"Green or Gold? Open Access after Finch"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on November 14th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Martin Hall has published "Green or Gold? Open Access after Finch" in the latest issue of Insights.

Here's an excerpt:

he Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings reported to the UK's Minister of Universities and Science in mid-2012. This was followed by a new policy for open access (OA) publishing by Research Councils UK (RCUK) as well as a commitment from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to require that research submitted to future research evaluation exercises—after the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF)—be open access. These initiatives build on a broad consensus, that includes for-profit publishers, that open access is the way of the future. Here, I give a perspective on these issues, both as the head of an institution with particular interests in the future of scholarly publication and also as a member of the Working Group on Expanding Access. The continuing development of informed debate will be critical for the future of the scholarly publishing system.

Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography Cover

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"Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Ineffectiveness"

Posted in Open Access, Self-Archiving on November 1st, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Yassine Gargouri, Vincent Lariviere, Yves Gingras, Tim Brody, Les Carr, Stevan Harnad have self-archived "Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Ineffectiveness" in arXiv.org.

Here's an excerpt:

We have now tested the Finch Committee's Hypothesis that Green Open Access Mandates are ineffective in generating deposits in institutional repositories. With data from ROARMAP on institutional Green OA mandates and data from ROAR on institutional repositories, we show that deposit number and rate is significantly correlated with mandate strength (classified as 1-12): The stronger the mandate, the more the deposits. The strongest mandates generate deposit rates of 70%+ within 2 years of adoption, compared to the un-mandated deposit rate of 20%. The effect is already detectable at the national level, where the UK, which has the largest proportion of Green OA mandates, has a national OA rate of 35%, compared to the global baseline of 25%. The conclusion is that, contrary to the Finch Hypothesis, Green Open Access Mandates do have a major effect, and the stronger the mandate, the stronger the effect (the Liege ID/OA mandate, linked to research performance evaluation, being the strongest mandate model). RCUK (as well as all universities, research institutions and research funders worldwide) would be well advised to adopt the strongest Green OA mandates and to integrate institutional and funder mandates.

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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Ireland Adopts "National Principles for Open Access Policy Statement"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on October 24th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Sean Sherlock, Minister of State, has announced that the Irish government has adopted the "National Principles for Open Access Policy Statement."

Here's an excerpt:

1. Peer reviewed journal articles and other research outputs resulting in whole or in part from publicly-funded research should be deposited in an Open Access repository and made publicly discoverable, accessible and re-usable as soon as possible and on an on-going basis. . . .

2. Repositories shall release the metadata immediately upon deposit. Open access to the full text paper should be made immediately upon deposit or upon the publication date at the latest. . . .

3. Researchers are encouraged to publish in Open Access Journals but publishing through Open Access Journals is not necessary to comply with this Open Access policy. Payment of additional Open Access charges through the 'Gold' Open Access model is not necessary to comply with this policy. . . .

4. A repository is suitable for this purpose when it provides free public access to its contents, supports interoperability with other repositories and with other research information and reporting systems, is harvestable by national portal/s and international aggregators and takes steps toward long-term preservation.

5. Research data should be deposited whenever this is feasible, and linked to associated publications where this is appropriate.

Read more about it at "Ireland Sets Open-Access Mandate."

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

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Good Practices For University Open-Access Policies

Posted in Author Rights, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on October 17th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Harvard Open Access Project has released Good Practices For University Open-Access Policies.

Here's an excerpt:

This is a guide to good practices for university open-access (OA) policies. It’s based on the type of policy adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, U of Kansas, U of Oregon, Trinity, Oberlin, Rollins, Wake Forest, Duke, U of Puerto Rico, Hawaii-Manoa, Columbia, Strathmore U, Emory, Princeton, Jomo Kenyatta, Utah State, Bifrõst, Miami, California-San Francisco, and the U Massachusetts Medical School (listing some but not all, and in chronological order). However, it includes recommendations that should be useful to institutions with other sorts of OA policy as well.

The guide is designed to evolve. No early version will cover every point on which good practices would be desirable or might be discernible. We plan to revise and enlarge it over time, building on our own experience and the experience of colleagues elsewhere. We welcome suggestions.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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"Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors’ Open Access Rights"

Posted in Author Rights, Copyright, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on September 30th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

David R. Hansen has published "Understanding and Making Use of Academic Authors' Open Access Rights" in the latest issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

METHODS To understand the scope of author-retained rights (including the right to purchase hybrid or other open access options) at some sample universities, author-rights data through the SHERPA/RoMEO API was combined with individual article citations (from Thomson Reuters' Web of Science) for works published over a one-year period (2011) and authored by individuals affiliated with five major U.S. research universities. RESULTS Authors retain significant rights in the articles that they create. Of the 29,322 unique articles authored over the one year period at the five universities, 28.83 percent could be archived in final PDF form and 87.95 percent could be archived as the post-print version. Nearly 43.47 percent also provided authors the choice of purchasing a hybrid paid open access option. DISCUSSION A significant percentage of current published output could be archived with little or no author intervention. With prior approval through an open access policy or otherwise, article manuscripts or final PDFs can be obtained and archived by library staff, and hybrid paid-OA options could be negotiated and exploited by library administrators.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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Important Changes for Users and Participants of the Open Access Tracking Project

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on September 16th, 2012 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Open Access Tracking Project is migrating to TagTeam.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) is moving to TagTeam.

If you previously subscribed to OATP feeds as a reader, or helped build OATP feeds as a tagger, this page explains how to continue with the TagTeam version of the project. If you haven't previously participated in OATP, this page explains how to get started.

  • As a reader, you should stop subscribing to the Connotea versions of the OATP feeds and start subscribing to the TagTeam versions. Starting September 17, 2012, only the TagTeam versions will be comprehensive.
  • As a tagger, you may continue to tag at Connotea if you wish. But you are now free to tag for OATP from other tagging platforms as well. Either way, you'll have to tell TagTeam to follow your OATP tagging activity.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship |

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