Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"Green and Gold Open Access Percentages and Growth, by Discipline"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 17th, 2012

Yassine Gargouri, Vincent Lariviere, Yves Gingras, Les Carr, and Stevan Harnad have self-archived "Green and Gold Open Access Percentages and Growth, by Discipline" in ePrints Soton.

Here's an excerpt from:

Most refereed journal articles today are published in subscription journals, accessible only to subscribing institutions, hence losing considerable research impact. Making articles freely accessible online ("Open Access," OA) maximizes their impact. Articles can be made OA in two ways: by self-archiving them on the web ("Green OA") or by publishing them in OA journals ("Gold OA"). We compared the percent and growth rate of Green and Gold OA for 14 disciplines in two random samples of 1300 articles per discipline out of the 12,500 journals indexed by Thomson-Reuters-ISI using a robot that trawled the web for OA full-texts. We sampled in 2009 and 2011 for publication year ranges 1998-2006 and 2005-2010, respectively. Green OA (21.4%) exceeds Gold OA (2.4%) in proportion and growth rate in all but the biomedical disciplines, probably because it can be provided for all journals articles and does not require paying extra Gold OA publication fees. The spontaneous overall OA growth rate is still very slow (about 1% per year). If institutions make Green OA self-archiving mandatory, however, it triples percent Green OA as well as accelerating its growth rate.

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

MIT Press Publishes Open Access by Peter Suber

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 17th, 2012

The MIT Press has published Open Access by Peter Suber. The Kindle version is currently available, and the paperback version can be preordered.

An open access version will be available one year from now.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

Utah State University Establishes Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Self-Archiving on June 10th, 2012

Utah State University has adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The new open access policy—officially known at USU as Policy 535—ensures that all employees at Utah State University retain the ability to share their publications with colleagues, students and the public upon their publication. The policy was first unanimously approved by USU's Faculty Senate in April, followed by approval by the President's Executive Committee with the endorsement of USU President Stan Albrecht.

Here's an excerpt from the policy:

All employees during their employment with the University grant to the University a nonexclusive license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of their scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for profit, and to authorize others to do the same. These articles will also be deposited in the University's Open Access Institutional Repository to ensure the widest possible dissemination. The nonexclusive license will be waived at the sole discretion of the author and will be administered on behalf of the Provost's Office by the Library.

Read more about it at "Open Access Policy Procedures."

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This bibliography is recommended for everyone interested in open access publishing." — M. Blobaum, Journal of the Medical Library Association 100, no. 1 (2012): 73. | Digital Scholarship |

Librarians at Miami University Libraries Adopt Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on May 16th, 2012

Librarians at the Miami University Libraries have adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt from "Miami University Librarians Pass Open Access Policy":

On Monday, the librarians at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio affirmed their commitment to the principles of Open Access by voting in favor of an Open Access policy. The policy, based on Harvard University's Model Policy, will increase access to librarians' scholarly articles. Librarians will begin depositing their scholarly output in the Scholarly Commons, Miami's institutional repository. Miami University Libraries is the first department on Miami's campus to successfully pass an open access policy. "I am so proud to work at Miami today," said Jen Waller, Interdisciplinary Research Librarian and Chair of the Libraries' Scholarly Communication Working Group. "My colleagues' vote in favor of an open access policy allows the Miami University Libraries to be a leader in Open Access on the Miami campus. Additionally, the adoption of this policy will allow librarians here to gain first hand knowledge of how facets of open access work, which will greatly improve our outreach efforts to faculty on campus."

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals | Digital Scholarship |

Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research for Voluntary and Charitable Sector Organisations.

Here's an excerpt:

We have learned in this study that the voluntary and charitable sector has an appetite and need for scholarly research that it cannot currently satisfy. The organisations contributing to the study have described the importance of research to the voluntary and charitable sector's commitment to playing its very distinctive role in the most effective way it can. In scoping interviews, case studies and survey responses, VCOs have identified a consistent set of barriers to accessing research. They have shown too that they are creative and resourceful, finding ways to overcome these barriers some of which might place them on or over the border of copyright infringement. We do not think that VCOs should be put in the position of having to choose between what is legally permitted and what they feel is ethically required of them in order to fulfil their charitable objectives. We think too that if the VCS is being asked to expand its role and play an increasing part in delivering public services, then access to research is essential. In this final chapter, we provide some recommendations which, we hope, will go some way to widening the voluntary and charitable sector's access to scholarly research outputs.

| Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: This is an excellent resource for its extensive background documentation of the open access arguments and issues. — Ann Jensen, Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, no. 43 (2005) | Digital Scholarship |

Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 3rd, 2012

JISC has released Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research to the Public Sector.

Here's an excerpt:

The total cost to the public sector of accessing journal papers is around £135 million per annum. The savings that accrue from the availability of Open Access articles (using both Green and Gold routes) amount to £28.6 million (£26 million in access fees and £2.6 million in time savings).

Extending the number or articles available through Open Access further increases the potential for savings. Each extra 5% of journal papers accessed via Open Access would save the public sector £1.7 million, even if no subscription fees were to be saved. Increasing the number of journal papers accessed through Open Access to 25% would save the public sector an extra £29 million.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

MIT Establishes Open Access Working Group in Response to Elsevier’s New Article Posting Policies

Posted in Author Rights, Open Access, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 25th, 2012

MIT has established an Open Access Working Group in response to Elsevier's new article posting policies.

Here's an excerpt from the "New Open Access Working Group Formed: Formulating Response to Elsevier's Policy Change":

The wording [of the Elsevier posting policy] is very unclear; no one is quite sure what a "systematic posting mandate" is. Duke, for one, who has an open access policy very much like ours, has concluded that such policies aren't "mandates" since they allow people to opt out, and hence that they are not covered by the new Elsevier posting policy. But it is clear that Elsevier is trying to do what it can to undermine such policies, and to confuse faculty about what they are and are not allowed to do. Certainly that is the interpretation of the Coalition for Open Access Repositories, who, in their response, "strongly oppose the changes made by Elsevier to its article posting policies" and "join the research community in condemning Elsevier for its recent business practices and lobbying that undermine policies and activities promoting open access to scholarly literature."

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

House Hearing on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 29th, 2012

The House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight held a hearing today on Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests.

Here are the documents that have been released for this hearing:

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: "This work gives an outstanding overview of scholarship relating to the growing Open Access movement." — George Machovec, The Charleston Advisor 12, no. 2 (2010): 3. | Digital Scholarship |

"Will An Institutional Repository Hurt My SSRN Ranking? Calming the Faculty Fear"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 28th, 2012

James M. Donovan and Carol A. Watson have published "Will An Institutional Repository Hurt My SSRN Ranking? Calming the Faculty Fear" in the latest issue of AALL Spectrum.

Here's an excerpt:

Plans for a new IR project within the law school, however, can quickly find such worthy motives swept aside as faculty members invariably voice some version of the following comments: "Won't posting my articles elsewhere steal downloads away from SSRN? That would lower my rankings in SSRN and perhaps reduce my professional stature."

One can regret that law academics today reflexively cower at the thought of appearing to perform poorly on any new ranking system that crosses their path, no matter how dubious. Even so, there can be no denying that SSRN, or the Social Science Research Network, has earned a respectable cachet among the professoriate.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

"The Effects of Open Access Mandates on Institutional Repositories in the UK and Germany"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 19th, 2012

Sabine Elisabeth Puskas has self-archived her Master's dissertation, "The Effects of Open Access Mandates on Institutional Repositories in the UK and Germany," in the Loughborough University Institutional Repository.

Here's an excerpt:

There is evidence that institutional mandates do have effects on institutional repositories in different ways, e.g. on content deposited and service provision. The effects vary according to the characteristics of repositories and the approach taken by institutions. The research results also indicate that the experiences of institutions with a mandate and the expectations of institutions without one are almost identical across both the UK and Germany, although the developmental context of institutional repositories and institutional mandates in these two countries are very different.

| Institutional Repository and ETD Bibliography 2011 | Digital Scholarship |

Fresh from Research Works Act Defeat, Association of American Publishers and Other Publishers Oppose Federal Research Public Access Act

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 8th, 2012

Eighty-one publishers have sent a letter to Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, Senator Susan M. Collins, and other legislators opposing the Federal Research Public Access Act.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The 81 signatories' main points of opposition to FRPAA are:

  • It requires that final manuscripts of researchers' journal articles that explain, interpret and extensively report the results of federally-funded research—manuscripts which have undergone publishers' validation, digital enhancement, production, interoperability and distribution processes—be publicly available online, worldwide, no more than six months after publication.
  • The one-size-fits-all six-month deadline for every federal agency that funds research ignores well-known significant differences in how each research discipline discovers and uses individual articles, periods that can last several years before costs are recovered.
  • It limits where government-funded researchers may publish their work.
  • It undermines publishers' investments in new business models that currently provide unprecedented access for the public to such works for free or at modest cost.
  • At a time when Congress is looking to cut unnecessary expenses in federal government and focus budgets on priorities, FRPAA imposes additional costs on all federal agencies by requiring them to divert critical research funding to the creation and management of new databases, archives and infrastructure to handle dissemination of these articles—functions already being performed by private-sector publishers.

The signatories are:

  • AACC International
  • Acoustical Society of America
  • American Association for Cancer Research
  • American Association for Clinical Chemistry
  • American Association of Anatomists
  • American Association of Immunologists
  • American Association of Physicists in Medicine
  • American Association of Physics Teachers
  • American Astronomical Society
  • The American Ceramic Society
  • American Chemical Society
  • American College of Chest Physicians
  • American College of Physicians
  • American Dental Association
  • American Fisheries Society
  • American Geophysical Union
  • American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • American Institute of Biological Sciences
  • American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
  • American Institute of Physics Publishing
  • American Mathematical Society
  • American Meteorological Society
  • American Physiological Society
  • American Phytopathological Society
  • American Psychiatric Publishing
  • American Psychological Association
  • American Public Health Association
  • American Roentgen Ray Society
  • American Society for Investigative Pathology
  • American Society for Nutrition
  • American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
  • American Society of Agronomy
  • American Society of Animal Science
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • American Society of Hematology
  • American Society of Plant Biologists
  • APMI International
  • ARVO—Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
  • ASQ—American Society for Quality
  • Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP)
  • AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing
  • Biophysical Society
  • Cambridge University Press
  • Crop Science Society of America
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Elsevier
  • The Endocrine Society
  • Entomological Society of America
  • F.A. Davis Company
  • GeoScienceWorld
  • Gival Press LLC
  • The Histochemical Society
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
  • IEEE
  • Institute of Food Technologists
  • International and American Associations for Dental Research
  • International Association for the Study of Pain
  • John Wiley & Sons
  • Lynne Rienner Publishers, Inc.
  • The McGraw-Hill Companies
  • Mycological Society of America
  • National Ground Water Association
  • The Optical Society
  • The Ornithological Council
  • The Physiological Society
  • Poultry Science Association
  • The Professional Animal Scientist
  • The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)
  • SAE International
  • Seismological Society of America
  • SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
  • Silverchair Science+Communications, Inc.
  • Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
  • Society for the Study of Reproduction
  • Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.
  • Soil Science Society of America
  • Springer Publishing Company
  • Taylor & Francis
  • Thieme Publishers
  • University of the Basque Country Press
  • Walters Kluwer

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography| Digital Scholarship |

Utah State Faculty Senate Passes Proposed "Retention of Authors Copyright to Scholarly Articles and Deposit in the University’s Open Access Repository" Policy

Posted in Author Rights, Open Access, Self-Archiving on March 6th, 2012

According to a library staff member, the Utah State Faculty Senate passed a proposed "Retention of Authors Copyright to Scholarly Articles and Deposit in the University's Open Access Repository" policy yesterday (see section 3:40, item 1). The policy will be sent next to the Human Resources department for further consideration since it is a proposed personnel policy.

Here's an excerpt:

(1) Author's Rights

The University recognizes the importance of copyright and urges faculty members to retain rights to their own scholarly articles. Therefore, if a publisher's standard contract requires the transfer of copyright and/or does not allow deposit in the University's open access repository, the University expects faculty authors to negotiate the terms of the publisher's contract by attaching an addendum to the contract asserting the author's right to retain the copyright and/or the right to deposit the published version or pre-print version of the scholarly article in the University's open access repository. Should a publisher insist on the transfer of copyright as a condition of publication or refuse to permit the deposition of the published version or preprint version of the scholarly article in the University's open access repository, it is at the faculty author's discretion whether or not to continue with the publication, which will invoke an automatic waiver to this policy (see 5.2(2)).

(2) Deposit in the University's Open Access Repository

Each faculty member grants permission to the University to post in the University's open access repository all of his or her scholarly, peer-reviewed journal articles published while employed by the University. In legal terms each faculty member grants to the University a nonexclusive license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for profit, and to authorize others to do the same. This license in no way interferes with the rights of a faculty author as the copyright holder of the work but instead promotes a wide distribution and increased impact of the author's work. If a faculty author's attempt to retain full rights is unsuccessful, the author may proceed with publication, thereby invoking an automatic waiver for that particular article. While it is not necessary in these situations to formally request a waiver, it is recommended that the author send the bibliographic citation to the Library, alerting librarians that a waiver is being invoked and that the publication may not be posted in the University's open access repository.

| Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |


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