Archive for the 'Self-Archiving' Category

"Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 9th, 2015

LSE Impact of Social Sciences has released "Dutch Universities Start Elsevier Boycott—Will This Be a Game Changer or Will Publisher Profits Remain Unaffected?."

Here's an excerpt:

Led by vice chancellors, Dutch universities have recently announced plans for a country-wide boycott of the academic publisher Elsevier. This boycott has the potential to be a significant game changer in the relationship between the research community and the world's largest academic publisher. But how will it affect open access momentum in the UK and around the world? Here we have brought together two expert views on the subject. Danny Kingsley, the Head of Scholarly Communication at University of Cambridge and Steven Harnad, longtime advocate for open access, share their views on what the Dutch boycott can hope to achieve.

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23 Groups Oppose Elsevier’s New Sharing and Hosting Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 21st, 2015

SPARC has released "New Policy from Elsevier Impedes Open Access and Sharing."

Here's an excerpt:

[Statement]

On April 30, 2015, Elsevier announced a new sharing and hosting policy for Elsevier journal articles. This policy represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders' open access policies. In addition, the policy has been adopted without any evidence that immediate sharing of articles has a negative impact on publishers' subscriptions.

Despite the claim by Elsevier that the policy advances sharing, it actually does the opposite. The policy imposes unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months for some journals. It also requires authors to apply a "non-commercial and no derivative works" license for each article deposited into a repository, greatly inhibiting the re-use value of these articles. Any delay in the open availability of research articles curtails scientific progress and places unnecessary constraints on delivering the benefits of research back to the public.

Furthermore, the policy applies to "all articles previously published and those published in the future" making it even more punitive for both authors and institutions. This may also lead to articles that are currently available being suddenly embargoed and inaccessible to readers.

As organizations committed to the principle that access to information advances discovery, accelerates innovation and improves education, we support the adoption of policies and practices that enable the immediate, barrier free access to and reuse of scholarly articles. This policy is in direct conflict with the global trend towards open access and serves only to dilute the benefits of openly sharing research results.

We strongly urge Elsevier to reconsider this policy and we encourage other organizations and individuals to express their opinions.

The statement is available here and we welcome others to show their support by also endorsing it.

The statement has been signed by the following groups:

COAR: Confederation of Open Access Repositories
SPARC: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
ACRL: Association of College and Research Libraries
ALA: American Library Association
ARL: Association of Research Libraries
Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
Australian Open Access Support Group
IBICT: Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology
CARL: Canadian Association of Research Libraries
CLACSO: Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales
COAPI: Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions
Creative Commons
Creative Commons (USA)
EIFL
Electronic Frontier Foundation
Greater Western Library Alliance
LIBER: European Research Library Association
National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences
OpenAIRE
Open Data Hong Kong
Research Libraries UK
SANLiC: South African National Licensing Consortium
University of St Andrews Library

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University of Windsor Senate Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 19th, 2015

The University of Windsor Senate has adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In recognition of the importance of providing open access to Windsor research, and building on the momentum of the Tri-Council Open Access Policy (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC), University Senate passed the University of Windsor's own open access policy (OA), Friday May 8. . . .

In Canada, the recent release of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications requires grant recipients, as of May 2015, to take steps to ensure that peer-reviewed journal publications arising from supported research are made freely accessible within 12 months of publication.

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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council Unanimously Adopts Open Access Policy

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on May 8th, 2015

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council has unanimously adopted an open access policy.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Resolution 2015-9: On Endorsing a University Open Access Policy represented more than a year of work by a 35-member faculty Open Access Task Force. Chairs Todd Vision and Julie Kimbrough told the University Gazette that they worked diligently to craft a policy recommendation that could be applied differently according to the needs of various disciplines.

UNC-CH is the 51st university or university unit to have adopted an open access policies by a unanimous faculty vote.

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"Stepping Back from Sharing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 5th, 2015

Kevin Smith has published "Stepping Back from Sharing" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

Here's an excerpt:

Two major features of this retreat from openness need to be highlighted. First, it imposes an embargo of at least one year on all self-archiving of final authors' manuscripts, and those embargoes can be as long as four years. Second, when the time finally does roll around when an author can make her own work available through an institutional repository, Elsevier now dictates how that access is to be controlled, mandating the most restrictive form of Creative Commons license, the CC-BY-NC-ND license for all green open access.

See also: "Elsevier Updates Its Article-Sharing Policies, Perspectives and Services" and "GET IT IN WRITING: On Elsevier's Revised Sharing/Hosting Policies."

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"Global Scholarship: The Role of Subject Repositories in Advancing Research from the Developing World"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Self-Archiving on May 5th, 2015

Julia Kelly and Linda Eells have published "Global Scholarship: The Role of Subject Repositories in Advancing Research from the Developing World" in College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

While subject repositories successfully fill a scholarly communication niche in particular disciplines, they have not been recognized for the important role they play in promoting global scholarship. Repositories such as AgEcon Search make valuable and unique contributions by increasing publishing options for researchers and thus exposing and distributing research produced in the developing world.

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Elsevier: "Unleashing the Power of Academic Sharing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 4th, 2015

Elsevier has released "Unleashing the Power of Academic Sharing."

Here's an excerpt:

Elsevier's updated sharing and hosting policies explain how articles published with Elsevier may be shared and made available. These provide a more clear and consistent framework that is aligned with the rest of the publishing industry, and which is based on feedback from our authors and institutional partners. While we know the policy changes will not go as far as some would like, we believe they strike an appropriate balance between the rights and responsibilities of sharing.

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"A Network Approach to Scholarly Communication Infrastructure"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on April 28th, 2015

Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg have published "A Network Approach to Scholarly Communication Infrastructure" in EDUCAUSE Review.

Here's an excerpt:

The open-access movement, fueled by the digital revolution, is transforming the business of scholarly communication, affecting the entire value chain. Rapidly emerging technologies have been crucial enablers of this transformation, blurring traditional roles and attracting new participants. The infrastructure and the economic framework established to support a centuries-old model of scholarly publishing are no longer adequate to the task. We believe that a radically different approach is required-one that is open, flexible, collaborative, and networked.

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50 Universities or University Units Have Now Adopted Open Access Policies by Unanimous Faculty Votes

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 20th, 2015

With recent votes by Boston University and University of Delaware faculty, 50 universities or university units, such as schools, have now adopted open access policies by unanimous faculty votes.

Here's a list from Unanimous Faculty Votes. See the original document for omitted details, and see the recently revised (and praised) Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies (ROARMAP) for a complete list of over 670 open access policies.

  1. February 12, 2008. Harvard University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  2. April 27, 2008. Macquarie University
  3. May 7, 2008, Harvard University, School of Law
  4. June 10, 2008, Stanford University, School of Education
  5. October 2008, University College London (UCL)
  6. February 11, 2009. Boston University
  7. March 6, 2009, Oregon State University, Library Faculty
  8. March 18, 2009, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  9. May 2009. University of Calgary, division of Library and Cultural Resources
  10. May 2009. University of Pretoria
  11. May 7, 2009, University of Oregon, Library Faculty
  12. May 14, 2009, University of Oregon, Department of Romance Languages
  13. May 14, 2009, Gustavus Adolphus College, Library Faculty
  14. October 1, 2009, York University, librarians and archivists
  15. October, 2009. Universidad de Oriente (Venezuela)
  16. November 18, 2009, Oberlin College
  17. December 2, 2009, University of Northern Colorado, Library Faculty
  18. February 1, 2010, Wake Forest University, Library faculty
  19. February 9, 2010, California Polytechnic State University
  20. February 12, 2010, Oregon State University College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences (COAS)
  21. February 24, 2010, University of Virginia
  22. February 25, 2010, Rollins College Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  23. March 18, 2010, Duke University
  24. March 24, 2010, University of Puerto Rico School of Law
  25. April 19, 2010, San Jose State University
  26. September 27, 2010, University of Northern Colorado
  27. October 2010, Trinity College Dublin
  28. December 22, 2010, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
  29. March 15, 2011, Emory University
  30. May 11, 2011, University of Pennsylvania
  31. September 2011, Princeton University
  32. October 19, 2011, Florida State University
  33. December 8, 2011, Pacific University
  34. January 27, 2012, Bifröst University
  35. February 15, 2012, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto
  36. April 2012, Utah State University
  37. May 21, 2012, University of California, San Francisco
  38. February 6, 2013, Wellesley College
  39. March 4, 2013, College of Wooster
  40. March 5, 2013, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Library faculty
  41. March 21, 2013, University of Rhode Island
  42. April 2013, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University
  43. June 13, 2013, Oregon State University
  44. December 2013, Télé-université (TELUQ), Université du Québec
  45. December 2, 2013, Columbia University, School of Social Work
  46. June 18, 2014, Harvard Medical School
  47. October 7, 2014, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
  48. October 9, 2014, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
  49. February 11, 2015, Boston University
  50. April 6, 2015, University of Delaware

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"Open Access Policy: Numbers, Analysis, Effectiveness"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 13th, 2015

A. Swan et al. have self-archived "Open Access Policy: Numbers, Analysis, Effectiveness".

Here's an excerpt:

The PASTEUR4OA project analyses what makes an Open Access (OA) policy effective. The total number of institutional or funder OA policies worldwide is now 663 (March 2015), over half of them mandatory. ROARMAP, the policy registry, has been rebuilt to record more policy detail and provide more extensive search functionality. Deposit rates were measured for articles in institutions' repositories and compared to the total number of WoS-indexed articles published from those institutions. Average deposit rate was over four times as high for institutions with a mandatory policy. Six positive correlations were found between deposit rates and (1) Must-Deposit; (2) Cannot-Waive-Deposit; (3) Deposit-Linked-to-Research-Evaluation; (4) Cannot-Waive-Rights-Retention; (5) Must-Make-Deposit-OA (after allowable embargo) and (6) Can-Waive-OA. For deposit latency, there is a positive correlation between earlier deposit and (7) Must-Deposit-Immediately as well as with (4) Cannot-Waive-Rights-Retention and with mandate age. There are not yet enough OA policies to test whether still further policy conditions would contribute to mandate effectiveness but the present findings already suggest that it would be useful for current and future OA policies to adopt the seven positive conditions so as to accelerate and maximise the growth of OA.

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"Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 10th, 2015

SPARC has released "Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA" by Heather Joseph.

Here's an excerpt:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its plan to create policies ensuring public access to articles and data resulting from its funded research, as required by the February 2013 White House directive. . . .

The NOAA plan calls for all agency-funded intramural and extramural researchers to deposit final, accepted manuscripts into the agency's repository upon acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal. Unlike many of the other agencies that have released plans to date, NOAA will also require its investigators to submit technical reports, data reports, and technical memoranda into the repository as well—significantly increasing the scope of the materials covered by the agency's policy.

NOAA will use the OSTP-suggested 12-month embargo period as its baseline. Like other agencies, it will provide stakeholders with a mechanism for petitioning the agency to change the embargo period. The plan indicates that requests must include evidence that outweighs the public benefit of having the embargo remain at one year. . . .

Currently, funded researchers are required to make data "visible and accessible" within two years. The new plan calls for this time frame to be shortened to just one year. It also indicates that data underlying the conclusions of peer-reviewed articles will most likely be required to be made available at the time of the article's publication, in appropriate repositories (presumably to be designated by NOAA).

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"Dramatic Growth of Open Access 2015 First Quarter"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 9th, 2015

Heather Morrison has published "Dramatic Growth of Open Access 2015 First Quarter" in The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics.

Here's an excerpt:

OpenDOAR added 129 repositories for a total of 2,857. The Bielefeld Academic Search Engine added close to 3 million documents for a total of over 71 million documents. Another 7,690 authors joined the Social Sciences Research Network for a total of over 275,000 authors.

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