Archive for the 'Serials Crisis' Category

Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on August 17th, 2017

Ithaka S+R has released Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.

Here's an excerpt:

There is widespread frustration within the academic library community with the seemingly uncontrollable price increases of e-resources, especially of licensed bundles of scholarly journals. The scholarly communications movement has vastly expanded academic and indeed public access to scholarly content. Yet prices for certain scholarly resources continue to outpace budget increases, and librarians do not feel in control of budgets and pricing. What if libraries found ways to bring together the whole library behind the objective of stabilizing or reducing what they pay?

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"Journal Publishers’ Big Deals: Are They Worth It?"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on May 12th, 2017

Stéphani Gagnon has self-archived "Journal Publishers' Big Deals: Are They Worth It?."

Here's an excerpt:

Following the initial Wiley's unbundling based on quantitative indicators, Université de Montréal refined its analysis methodology to incorporate qualitative indicators; i.e., the voice of its community. That methodology allowed identification of 5,893 periodicals deemed essential out of a possible 50,000 subscriptions. We realized that, at best, barely more than a third of the periodicals included in most Big Deals are truly of use.

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"New World, Same Model: Periodicals Price Survey 2017"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 20th, 2017

Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson have published "New World, Same Model: Periodicals Price Survey 2017" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Since e-journal package prices are often based on custom publisher quotes, we analyzed the 2017 price increases of more than 6,300 e-journal packages handled by EBSCO and found that the average inflationary increase for 2017 was in the 4.5%–4.9% range. Reflecting the percentage of library orders dedicated to electronic format, approximately 78% of the 2017 orders placed by EBSCO on behalf of academic libraries were for either e-only or print plus online combinations.

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"Transparency and Openness to Scientific Publishing: The Finnish Research Organisations Pay Millions of Euros Annually to the Large Publishers"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on June 15th, 2016

The Open Science and Research Initiative has released "Transparency and Openness to Scientific Publishing: The Finnish Research Organisations Pay Millions of Euros Annually to the Large Publishers."

Here's an excerpt:

Open Science and Research Initiative announces the scientific publisher costs paid by Finnish universities and research organizations from 2010 to 2015. According to the data, the publisher costs have risen around ten percent per year. . . .

Publisher cost data is now available as open data licensed under CC BY 4.0 license. You are free to share and adapt the data for any purpose, with author attribution and indication if changes were made. Publisher cost details and a link to the web application can be found at openscience.fi/publisher_costs.

See also: "Scientific Journal Subscription Costs in Finland 2010-2015: A Preliminary Analysis."

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"Fracking the Ecosystem: Periodicals Price Survey 2016"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 22nd, 2016

Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson have published "Fracking the Ecosystem: Periodicals Price Survey 2016" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Accordingly, we have measured the 2015 price increases of more than 5,000 e-journal packages handled by EBSCO. Our analysis indicates an average e-journal package price increase of 5.8% to 6.3%, down slightly from last year's average of 6.6%.

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"Big Publishers, Bigger Profits: How the Scholarly Community Lost the Control of Its Journals"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on March 3rd, 2016

Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein, and Philippe Mongeon have published "Big Publishers, Bigger Profits: How the Scholarly Community Lost the Control of Its Journals" in MediaTropes.

Here's an excerpt:

Despite holding the potential to liberate scholarly information, the digital era has, to the contrary, increased the control of a few for-profit publishers. While most journals in the print era were owned by academic institutions and scientific societies, the majority of scientific papers are currently published by five for-profit publishers, which often exhibit profit margins between 30%-40%. This paper documents the evolution of this consolidation over the last 40 years, discusses the peculiar economics of scholarly publishing, and reflects upon the role of publishers in today's academe.

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Serials Price Projections for 2016

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on October 2nd, 2015

EBSCO has released Serials Price Projections for 2016.

Here's an excerpt:

At the time of writing, we expect the overall effective publisher price increases for academic and academic/medical libraries for 2016 (before currency impact) to be in the range of 4 to 6 percent.

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"Journal Subscription Expenditure of UK Higher Education Institutions, Version 3″

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on July 27th, 2015

Stuart Lawson and Ben Meghreblian have published "Journal Subscription Expenditure of UK Higher Education Institutions, Version 3." in F1000Research.

Here's an excerpt:

The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs) pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 153 HEIs' expenditure with ten publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

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DSpace@MIT Tops 3 Million Downloads

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on May 26th, 2015

MIT's DSpace@MIT repository has had over 3 million downloads as of the end of April.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT now contains over 16,600 articles, which collectively were downloaded over 90,000 times in April.

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"Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On | Periodicals Price Survey 2015"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 24th, 2015

Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson have published "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On | Periodicals Price Survey 2015" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) continues to develop, but some financial analysts, such as Sami Kassab, executive director at investment firm Exane BNP Paribas, now believe that OA may no longer be a pressure point on commercial publishing. OA has not been the disruptive force on commercial publishing for which many had hoped.

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"Freedom of Information Requests Uncover the Lack of Transparency in Journal Subscription Costs"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on October 16th, 2014

Stuart Lawson and Ben Meghreblian have published "Freedom of Information Requests Uncover the Lack of Transparency in Journal Subscription Costs" in The LSE's Daily Blog on American Politics and Policy.

Here's an excerpt:

Making use of the UK's Freedom of Information (FOI) law we sent FOI requests to over 100 higher education institutions via the website whatdotheyknow.com asking them to release their data. Using this website has the dual benefit of making the process simple to scale up when sending multiple requests and also ensuring that the responses are in the public domain.

In two rounds of requests we asked for the amount of money that these institutions had paid to six of the largest academic publishers—Wiley, Springer, Taylor & Francis, Sage, Oxford University Press, and Cambridge University Press—over a period of five years. The results have been collated and over £80m of subscription expenditure has been openly released. This process was for the most part straightforward and just required a lot of persistence and a little knowledge of library processes, which allowed us to know how to phrase the request and how to respond to any queries from the institutions.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

2013 Study of Subscription Prices for Scholarly Society Journals

Posted in Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on October 15th, 2013

Allen Press has released the 2013 Study of Subscription Prices for Scholarly Society Journals.

Here's an excerpt:

This study aims to provide information to society and association publishers on pricing and library budget trends, strategies libraries use for cost containment, content selection and cancellation criteria, access preferences, and user behavior.

The Allen Press panel and several other studies done in 2012 highlight that librarians use a variety of strategies to work within budgets that are not improving significantly. The following is a review of scholarly journal price trends during the past year. The data presented in this study summarize historical prices of approximately 200 publications appearing in the Allen Press Buyer’s Guide to Scientific, Medical, and Scholarly Journals.

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