Digital Curation News (6/23/2014) #digitalpreservation

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Director of Library Technology at Central Michigan University

Central Michigan University is recruiting a Director of Library Technology.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Director of Library Technology provides vision and strategic leadership for Library Systems in a team- and service-oriented environment. The Director is responsible for overseeing and managing the full life cycle of the University Libraries' systems, applications, hardware, and web services. The Director manages the departmental budget, leads a department of six staff members, and serves as a member of the Libraries' senior management group. The Director will develop and employ strategies to ensure that the library systems support the academic needs of a 21st century university.

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Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 4

Digital Scholarship has released version 4 of the Research Data Curation Bibliography. This selective bibliography includes over 320 English-language articles and technical reports that are useful in understanding the curation of digital research data in academic and other research institutions.

The "digital curation" concept is still evolving. In "Digital Curation and Trusted Repositories: Steps toward Success," Christopher A. Lee and Helen R. Tibbo define digital curation as follows:

Digital curation involves selection and appraisal by creators and archivists; evolving provision of intellectual access; redundant storage; data transformations; and, for some materials, a commitment to long-term preservation. Digital curation is stewardship that provides for the reproducibility and re-use of authentic digital data and other digital assets. Development of trustworthy and durable digital repositories; principles of sound metadata creation and capture; use of open standards for file formats and data encoding; and the promotion of information management literacy are all essential to the longevity of digital resources and the success of curation efforts.

Most sources have been published from January 2009 through June 2014; however, a limited number of earlier key sources are also included.

The bibliography includes links to freely available versions of included works. If such versions are unavailable, links to the publishers' descriptions are provided.

It is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

For broader coverage of the digital curation literature, see the author's Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works,which presents over 650 English-language articles, books, and technical reports, and the Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works, 2012 Supplement, which presents over 130 additional sources.

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Digital Projects Developer at Duke University

Duke University is recruiting a Digital Projects Developer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Digital Projects Developer develops and maintains web applications utilized by faculty, staff, students, and patrons of the Duke University Libraries (DUL). S/He provides support for middleware and interface development for DUL's enterprise platforms. S/He serves as analyst in a variety of areas, including data management, usability, applications architecture, and workflow enhancement.

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A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher


Introduction

Twenty-five years? It's hard to believe I've been doing this since Madonna's "Express Yourself" was in the top 40. I don't typically write about personal matters in DigitalKoans, but here's a mini-memoir, so please indulge me.

Here are the highlights of my open access publishing activities since June 1989. A full chronology is also available.

PACS-L and the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review

Twenty-five years ago I went to the ALA Annual Conference and passed out a few leaflets announcing the Public-Access Computer Systems Forum (PACS-L), a LISTSERV list intended to foster discussion on the then-revolutionary idea that library users could access digital information themselves instead of submitting database search requests to librarians. At the time, PCs were being used to provide access to databases on CD-ROMs and some avant-garde libraries were providing access to "locally-mounted databases" on minicomputers. In 1989, librarians were reading papers such as "Library Applications of CD-ROM"; "Loading Local Machine-Readable Data Files: Issues, Problems, and Answers"; and my "Public-Access Computer Systems: The Next Generation of Library Automation Systems."

I was particularly interested in the emergence of public-access computer systems because the University of Houston, where I worked as the library's Assistant Director for Systems, had a President who envisioned a bold new age of digital information access. One of my first tasks when I a took the job in 1987 was to flesh-out, in a couple of weeks, the details of this vision for a very substantial grant proposal. By the summer of 1989, I had spent a considerable amount of time reviewing the literature on "electronic publishing" and grappling with how to make the potential real. The library's visionary director, Robin N. Downes, was very supportive of my starting PACS-L (and of my subsequent digital publishing efforts at UH).

My expectations at ALA were modest; however, the timing was right and PACS-L was one of the first lists to focus on a broad topic rather than a single library automation system. Moreover, PACS-L soon morphed into a list that dealt with the nascent Internet and its implications for libraries and electronic publishing. Consequently, it grew rapidly, and, within a year, had over 1,400 subscribers (at its peak, it had over 10,000 subscribers).

In this uber-interactive age, it is difficult to convey the early excitement that the development of this new digital community held, especially as it became more international. In short order, I began to consider the possibility of launching an e-journal, and I floated the idea on PACS-L.

Although the technological infrastructure of the time was primitive at best, on August 16, 1989, I announced the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, an e-journal whose articles would be distributed as ASCII text files using a LISTSERV server. Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review will contain short articles (1 to 7 single-spaced pages), columns, and reviews. PACS Review will cover all computer systems that libraries make available to their patrons, including CAI and ICAI programs, CD-ROM databases, expert systems, hypermedia systems, information delivery systems, local databases, online catalogs, and remote end-user search systems. All types of short communications dealing with these subjects are welcome. Articles that present innovative projects in libraries, even those at an early stage of their development, are especially welcome. Proposals for regular (or irregular) columns will be considered on an ongoing basis. There will be a section for reviews of books, journal articles, reports, and software.

A call for papers was issued in October, and the first issue was announced in January 1990. The journal became peer-reviewed in November 1991.

Starting with its first issue, The Public-Access Computer Systems Review was freely available, allowed noncommercial use, and allowed authors to retain their copyrights. There was no established theoretical or legal context for doing so. The concept of "open access" wouldn't be articulated until the Budapest Open Access Initiative declaration in February 2002, and the Creative Commons wouldn't release its first license until December 2002.

Needless to say, the journal was product of many hands, including its hardworking editorial staff, its very engaged editorial board, its risk-taking authors, and its columnists.

From 1994 through 2005 (the only years that data is available), The Public-Access Computer Systems Review had over 3.5 million file requests.

In the early 1990s, I also cofounded and coedited Public-Access Computer Systems News, which published short news items, and founded and moderated the PACS-P list, which announced new e-serials issues for publications such as Current Cites.

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review and Public-Access Computer Systems News are preserved in the Internet Archive. The University of Houston has a partial archive of the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (only ASCII versions of articles, not the HTML website or HTML versions of articles published from 1995 onwards) and a complete archive of Public-Access Computer Systems News. After the University of Houston deleted the PACS-L archive in 2013, it is no longer publicly available.

For more details about PACS-L and The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, see:

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography evolved out of three bibliographies about "electronic publishing on networks" that I published in The Public-Access Computer Systems Review. I was motivated to write them because it was difficult to track this emerging trend using conventional indexes, and I thought that making this information more accessible would foster the further development of digital publishing.

The final bibliography in this series, "Network-Based Electronic Publishing of Scholarly Works: A Selective Bibliography," was the result of an experimental publishing strategy that I tried in the journal: the option for authors to update their articles. This article was updated 26 times between March 1995 and October 1996.

By its final version, the bibliography had outgrown the article format, and I transformed it into an electronic book: the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography. Since the literature never stopped changing, I decided that the book wouldn't either: it would be updated periodically. And so it was: 80 times from October 1996 through October 2011. Always freely available, I put it under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License in July 2004.

Over the course of its evolution, it was distributed as PDF files, printed books, a website, and Word files. By the time the last print version was published in early 2011, it was over 460 pages long. Along the way, a directory of related resources ("Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources, which was published from 2000 though 2009) and a weblog that listed new works (the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog, which was published from 2001 through 2013) were added to the bibliography.

The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is archived at Digital Scholarship and the Internet Archive. The University of Houston Libraries no longer maintains an archive of the e-book.

From October 1996 through December 2005, the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography had over 5.5 million file requests.

For more information about the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, see:

Digital Scholarship

By 2005, I felt that the technological infrastructure had evolved to the point where it was feasible for a single individual to perform all the functions of a digital publisher, and I established my own open access digital press, Digital Scholarship. As you know, it provides information and commentary about digital copyright, digital curation, digital repositories, open access, scholarly communication, and other digital information issues. Its publications are under versions of the Creative Commons Attribution or Attribution-Noncommercial Licenses. I also established DigitalKoans that year to provide timely coverage of those topics.

In November 2006, I resigned my position as Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development at the University of Houston Libraries, and I migrated the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography to Digital Scholarship.

Until 2009, Digital Scholarship only published digital works. In May of that year, I published the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography: 2008 Annual Edition as a low-cost paperback with an open access digital version.

To date, Digital Scholarship has published the following works:

Not unexpectedly, the most popular books, aside from the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, have been those about open access:

  • Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: 0ver 627,000 file requests.
  • Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: Over 637,000 file requests.

During the time it was published by Digital Scholarship, all digital versions of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography had over 7.1 million file requests, bringing the total number of file requests to over 12.6 million.

From April 2005 through May 2014, Digital Scholarship had over 13.7 million visitors from 230 counties and over 66.8 million file requests.

By analyzing Digital Scholarship log data with Weblog Expert, it is possible to separate out spider requests, to break out page views (a page view would be for a Epub, HTM, HTML, PDF, text, or Word file), to determine the number of unique IPs, and to gauge bandwidth use.

Here's the breakdown for the same period:

  • Total file requests: Over 66.8 million
  • Spider file requests: Over 26.2 million (about 39% of file requests)
  • Total page views: Over 47.7 million (about 71% of file requests)
  • Total unique IPs: 1.4 million
  • Total bandwidth: Over 1,700 GB

Conclusion

In the age of Google, bibliographies may seem antiquated. Digital Scholarship's use data argues otherwise. Certainly, the scholarly information that users are seeking is typically on search engines, but extracting it can be a time-consuming and vexing process. For example, in the early days of the open access movement, Google search results for this topic were replete with papers about surgical procedures, restricted access to beaches, and other false drops.

My publishing efforts have been driven by advocacy. I write to foster the development of causes that I care about. I hope that my contributions have had a positive impact on them.

As to the future of Digital Scholarship, I haven't taken a lengthy publishing vacation in 25 years, so it may be time for a sabbatical. I've become increasingly involved in creating digital art, and that taking up more of my time. We'll see.

Preservation-wise, I've put the major works in the Internet Archive, but, as an individual unaffiliated with a university, can't do much beyond that. As you would imagine, I have extensive digital work files and publication use data dating from the dawn of open access, but I'm not sure how to archive them.

So, onward, and, hopefully, upward. Thanks for your interest and support over the last quarter-century.

And a special thanks to the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review editorial staff, editorial board, and columnists:

Editor-in-Chiefs

  • Pat Ensor (1997-2000)
  • Thomas C. Wilson (1997-2000)

Editors:

  • Leslie Dillon, Associate Editor (1990) and Associate Editor, Columns (1991-1997)
  • Elizabeth A. Dupuis, Associate Editor, Columns (1997-2000)
  • John E. Fadell, Copy Editor (1998-2000)
  • Andrea Bean Hough, Associate Editor, Communications (1997-2000)
  • Mike Ridley, Associate Editor (1989-1990) and Associate Editor, Reviews (1991)
  • Dana Rooks, Associate Editor, Communications (1991-1997)
  • Robert Spragg, Associate Editor, Technical Support (1996-2000)
  • Roy Tennant, Associate Editor, Reviews (1992-1993)
  • Ann Thornton, Associate Editor, Production (1995-2000)

Editorial Board:

  • Ralph Alberico (1992-2000)
  • George H. Brett II (1992-2000)
  • Priscilla Caplan (1994-2000)
  • Steve Cisler (1992-2000)
  • Walt Crawford (1989-2000)
  • Lorcan Dempsey (1992-2000)
  • Pat Ensor (1994-1996)
  • Nancy Evans (1989-2000)
  • Stephen Harter (1997-2000)
  • Charles Hildreth (1992-2000)
  • Ronald Larsen (1992-2000)
  • Clifford Lynch (1992-2000)
  • David R. McDonald (1989-2000)
  • R. Bruce Miller (1989-2000)
  • Ann Okerson (1997-2000)
  • Paul Evan Peters (1989-1996)
  • Mike Ridley (1992-2000)
  • Peggy Seiden (1995-2000)
  • Peter Stone (1989-2000)
  • John E. Ulmschneider (1992-2000)

Columnists

  • Priscilla Caplan (1992-1998)
  • Walt Crawford (1989-1995)
  • Martin Halbert (1990-1993)

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Digital Curation News (6/20/2014) #digitalpreservation

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Website and User Interface Designer at West Virginia University

West Virginia University is recruiting a Website and User Interface Designer.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The West Virginia University Libraries is looking for a Website and User Interface Designer to oversee graphic design of library websites, web application interfaces, and other web-based projects.

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Software Patents: Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Ruling

The Supreme Court has ruled in the Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank software patent case.

Here's an excerpt from "Bad Day for Bad Patents: Supreme Court Unanimously Strikes Down Abstract Software Patent":

In a long-awaited decision, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank today, striking down an abstract software patent. Essentially, the Court ruled that adding "on a computer" to an abstract idea does not make it patentable. Many thousands of software patents—particularly the vague and overbroad patents so beloved by patent trolls—should be struck down under this standard. Because the opinion leaves many details to be worked out (such as the scope of an "abstract idea"), it might be a few years until we understand its full impact.

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Digital Applications Librarian at University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is recruiting a Digital Applications Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Digital Applications Librarian is responsible for providing leadership and expertise for the Libraries on existing and emerging technologies including digital repository, discovery and preservation systems. This position manages the day-to-day technical support for digital asset management systems and digital humanities' tools; recommends, configures, and provides support for new and emerging technologies and processes; provides essential leadership in consortial and partner collaborations and actively participates in the Hydra Community representing University of Oregon and Oregon Digital. This position supervises .5 FTE student assistants and reports to the Head, Digital Scholarship Center.

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"Liberating the Publications of a Distinguished Scholar: A Pilot Project"

Julie Kelly has published "Liberating the Publications of a Distinguished Scholar: A Pilot Project" in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

Many distinguished scholars published the primary corpus of their work before the advent of online journals, which makes it more challenging to access. Upon being approached by a distinguished Emeritus Professor seeking advice about getting his work posted online, librarians at the University of Minnesota worked to gain copyright permissions to scan and upload older works to the University's Digital Conservancy (UDC). This project then uniquely took the process one step further, using the sharing option of RefWorks to make these works accessible to the widest possible audience while concurrently offering the sophisticated functionality of a citation manager. With open access repositories gaining acceptance as an authoritative long-term venue for making resources available online, including older content that can be digitized, the methods developed in this pilot project could easily be followed by others, thus greatly increasing access to older literature from distinguished scholars.

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Information Technology Specialist (Systems Analysis) at Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is recruiting an Information Technology Specialist (Systems Analysis).

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The incumbent reports to the Project Manager for Digital Initiatives in repository development and works with a specialized group of programmers on complex, multi-faceted prototype and production systems, and assists with software analysis, design, development, documentation and implementation of these systems. The incumbent updates and modifies existing Library applications, designs and implements new applications, generates documentation, and is responsible for the maintenance and upgrades. The position resolves the critical issues affecting the configuration of the information technology (IT) infrastructure and conducts information requirements analysis to identify priority areas for improvement of current systems.

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"The Dark Side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: The Case of Latin-American Repositories"

Enrique Orduña-Malea et al. have self-archived "The Dark Side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: The Case of Latin-American Repositories."

Here's an excerpt:

The main objective of this study is to ascertain the presence and visibility of Latin American repositories in Google and Google Scholar through the application of page count and visibility indicators. For a sample of 137 repositories, the results indicate that the indexing ratio is low in Google, and virtually nonexistent in Google Scholar; they also indicate a complete lack of correspondence between the repository records and the data produced by these two search tools. These results are mainly attributable to limitations arising from the use of description schemas that are incompatible with Google Scholar (repository design) and the reliability of web indicators (search engines). We conclude that neither Google nor Google Scholar accurately represent the actual size of open access content published by Latin American repositories; this may indicate a non-indexed, hidden side to open access, which could be limiting the dissemination and consumption of open access scholarly literature.

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Information Technology Specialist (Application Development and Infrastructure) at Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is recruiting a Information Technology Specialist (Application Development and Infrastructure).

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The incumbent reports to the Project Manager for Digital Initiatives in repository development and works with a specialized group of programmers on complex, multi-faceted prototype and production systems, and assists with software analysis, design, development, documentation and implementation of these systems. The incumbent updates and modifies existing Library applications, designs and implements new applications, generates documentation, and is responsible for the maintenance and upgrades.

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Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase

Ithaka S+R has released Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host-Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In this study, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ithaka S+R explored the different models colleges and universities have adopted to support DH outputs on their campuses. . . .

Over the course of this study, Ithaka S+R interviewed more than 125 stakeholders and faculty project leaders at colleges and universities within the US. These interviews included a deep-dive phase of exploration focused on support for the digital humanities at four campuses”Columbia University, Brown University, Indiana University Bloomington, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. This research helped us to better understand how institutions are navigating issues related to the sustainability of DH resources and what successful strategies are emerging.

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Digital Curation News (6/18/2014) #digitalpreservation

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Digital Production Librarian at University of North Texas

The University of North Texas is recruiting a Digital Production Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Digital Production Librarian is responsible for the general operation of the Digital Projects Lab and works to complete internally- and externally- funded digitization projects in a cost effective manner with high-quality output. The librarian will collaborate with internal and external stakeholders to plan, coordinate, and execute digitization and other digital projects as part of the mission of the UNT Libraries. The librarian will also work closely with other teams and units within the Digital Libraries Division to improve online tools and processes needed by the Lab.

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"Evaluating Big Deal Journal Bundles"

Theodore C. Bergstrom et al. have published "Evaluating Big Deal Journal Bundles" in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. An open access eprint is not available.

Read more about it at "How Much Did Your University Pay for Your Journals?" and "Universities 'Get Poor Value' from Academic Journal-Publishing Firms."

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Digital Media Librarian at Juilliard School

The Juilliard School is recruiting a Digital Media Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

  • Oversee digital preservation of archival audio and video collections, including metadata creation
  • Work closely with other departments that capture Juilliard performances, including Recording Department and Dance Division
  • Work closely with IT staff on digital file storage
  • Coordinate access to archival media with in-house Juilliard Concert Program Database, and JUILCAT online library catalog

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University of Georgia Names Toby Graham as University Librarian and Associate Provost

The University of Georgia has named Toby Graham as its new University Librarian and Associate Provost.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Graham has served as deputy university librarian since 2009, a role in which he supported strategic planning, administration and resource allocation for the libraries and oversaw fundraising. He also directs the university's Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library and oversees the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, which holds 70,000 cubic feet of archives, 200,000 volumes and 200,000 media items.

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Digital Curation News (6/17/2014) #digitalpreservation

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Digital Scholarship Librarian at University of Northern Iowa

The University of Northern Iowa is recruiting a Digital Scholarship Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

Rod Library at the University of Northern Iowa seeks an innovative, self-motivated individual to serve in a newly created tenure-track position as the manager of an institutional repository being implemented at the University in 2014/2015. In addition, the individual will coordinate education and outreach for scholarly communication across campus.

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"The ‘Digital’ Scholarship Disconnect"

Clifford Lynch has published "The 'Digital' Scholarship Disconnect" in EDUCAUSE Review.

Here's an excerpt:

Still, in all of these examples of digital scholarship, a key challenge remains: How can we curate and manage data now that so much of it is being produced and collected in digital form? How can we ensure that it will be discovered, shared, and reused to advance scholarship? We are struggling through the establishment of institutions, funding models, policies and practices, and even new legal requirements and community norms—ranging from cultural changes about who can use data (and when) to economic decisions about who should pay for what. Some disciplines are less contentious than others: for example, astronomy data is technically well-understood and usually not terribly sensitive. Reputation, rather than commercial reward, is wrapped up in astronomical discoveries, and there is no institutional review board to ensure the safety and dignity of astronomical objects. On the other hand, human subjects and their data raise an enormous number of questions about informed consent, privacy, and anonymization; when there are genetic markers or possible treatments to be discovered or validated, serious high-value commercial interests may be at stake. All of these factors tend to work against the free and convenient sharing of data.

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Digital Asset Coordinator at Texas State Library and Archives Commission

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission is recruiting a Digital Asset Coordinator.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Digital Assets Coordinator oversees the digitization of archival materials, manage the digital assets of the State Archives and perform high resolution scans on archival collections. Working with the Assistant Director for Archives and division staff, explores and develops digital imaging opportunities within the division. Ensures the completeness and accuracy of digitized materials. May train and supervise the work of others. Works under limited supervision with moderate latitude for the use of initiative and independent judgment.

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"The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship"

Bryan Sinclair has published "The University Library as Incubator for Digital Scholarship" in EDUCAUSE Review.

Here's an excerpt:

The campus of the future will be increasingly connected and collaborative, and the library can be the community center and beta test kitchen for new forms of interdisciplinary inquiry. Libraries have always been in the business of knowledge creation and transfer, and the digital scholarship incubator within the library can serve as a natural extension of this essential function. In an age of visualization, analytics, big data, and new forms of online publishing, these central spaces can facilitate knowledge creation and transfer by connecting people, data, and technology in a shared collaborative space.

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Head of the Kelley Center for Government Information, Data and Geospatial Services at Rice University’s Fondren Library

Rice University's Fondren Library is recruiting a Head of the Kelley Center for Government Information, Data and Geospatial Services.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Head of the Kelley Center for Government Information, Data and Geospatial Services develops and implements a vision for providing cutting-edge, user-centered services focused on government information, data, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In consultation with stakeholders, the incumbent oversees planning and strategic development for the Kelley Center in support of the goals of the Fondren Library and Rice University. He or she actively conducts outreach and ensures the effective provision of research and user services, particularly in areas demanding resources and expertise in government information, GIS and data.

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