Research Library Issues, no. 297 (2019): The Current Privacy Landscape

ARL has released Research Library Issues, no. 297 (2019): The Current Privacy Landscape.

Here's an excerpt from the "Introduction" by Mary Lee Kennedy:

In this first issue of Research Library Issues (RLI) in 2019, the authors explore privacy from a legal, digital, and applied perspective, with a focus on the implications and opportunities for research libraries. The current privacy landscape highlights the need for a nuanced understanding of the complicated nature of privacy today. Research libraries need to collaborate with other privacy-related constituents within institutions and in the public policy and legislative arenas, and act as trusted institutions within a democratic society.

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Data Services Librarian at Georgia State University

Georgia State University is recruiting a Data Services Librarian.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

This position focuses primarily on assisting the university community with finding, evaluating, and using quantitative data involving statistical analysis software. While we do not expect that our Data Services Librarian be an expert in statistics or statistical computing, we are seeking a self-motivated individual ready to dive-in and learn new skills and tools, including but not limited to R, RStudio, SAS, SPSS, and STATA.

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"Who Owns the Law? Why We Must Restore Public Ownership of Legal Publishing"

Leslie Street and David Hansen have self-archived "Who Owns the Law? Why We Must Restore Public Ownership of Legal Publishing."

Here's an excerpt:

Each state has its own method for officially publishing the law. This article looks at the history of legal publishing for the fifty states before looking at how legal publishing even in moving to electronic publishing may not ensure public access to the law. The article addresses barriers to free access to the law in electronic publishing including copyright, contract law, and potentially, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The article concludes with prescriptions for how different actors, including state governments, publishers, libraries, and others can ensure robust public access to the law moving forward.

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