Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

American’ Views on Open Government Data

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Reports and White Papers on April 24th, 2015

The Pew Research Center has released American' Views on Open Government Data.

Here's an excerpt:

Few Americans think governments are very effective in sharing data they collect with the public:

  • Just 5% say the federal government does this very effectively, with another 39% saying the federal government does this somewhat effectively.
  • 5% say state governments share data very effectively, with another 44% saying somewhat effectively.
  • 7% say local governments share data very effectively, with another 45% responding somewhat effectively.

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    Preparing the Workforce for Digital Curation

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Reports and White Papers on April 23rd, 2015

    The National Academies Press has released Preparing the Workforce for Digital Curation .

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The massive increase in digital information in the last decade has created new requirements arising from a deficit in the institutional and technological structures and the human capital necessary to utilize and sustain the abundance of new digital information. This National Research Council consensus study report focuses on the need for education and training in digital curation to meet the societal demands for access to and meaningful use of digital information, now and in the future. For the purposes of this study, digital curation is defined as: "The active management and enhancement of digital information assets for current and future use." This definition provided the committee with a shared understanding of the scope of digital curation. As discussed below, digital curation entails more than secure storage and preservation of digital information because curation may add value to digital information and increase its utility.

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      "Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 10th, 2015

      SPARC has released "Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA" by Heather Joseph.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its plan to create policies ensuring public access to articles and data resulting from its funded research, as required by the February 2013 White House directive. . . .

      The NOAA plan calls for all agency-funded intramural and extramural researchers to deposit final, accepted manuscripts into the agency's repository upon acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal. Unlike many of the other agencies that have released plans to date, NOAA will also require its investigators to submit technical reports, data reports, and technical memoranda into the repository as well—significantly increasing the scope of the materials covered by the agency's policy.

      NOAA will use the OSTP-suggested 12-month embargo period as its baseline. Like other agencies, it will provide stakeholders with a mechanism for petitioning the agency to change the embargo period. The plan indicates that requests must include evidence that outweighs the public benefit of having the embargo remain at one year. . . .

      Currently, funded researchers are required to make data "visible and accessible" within two years. The new plan calls for this time frame to be shortened to just one year. It also indicates that data underlying the conclusions of peer-reviewed articles will most likely be required to be made available at the time of the article's publication, in appropriate repositories (presumably to be designated by NOAA).

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        "Digital Curation Education and Training: From Digitization to Graduate Curricula to MOOCs"

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 7th, 2015

        Helen R. Tibbo has published "Digital Curation Education and Training: From Digitization to Graduate Curricula to MOOCs" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This paper traces the development of digital and data curation curricula. Due to the brief length of this paper, the focus is on North American initiatives and primarily on continuing education programs. It explores the strengths and weaknesses of professional workshops and the creation of graduate-level courses, certificates, degrees and MOOCs, as well as the role of funding agencies in this process. It concludes with an analysis of what is missing and what is needed to create the workforce required to steward digital assets in the foreseeable future

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          "Geographic Information and Technologies in Academic Research Libraries: An ARL Survey of Services and Support"

          Posted in ARL Libraries, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on April 2nd, 2015

          Ann L Holstein has published "Geographic Information and Technologies in Academic Research Libraries: An ARL Survey of Services and Support" in Information Technology and Libraries.

          Here's an excerpt:

          One hundred fifteen academic libraries, all current members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), were selected to participate in an online survey in an effort to better understand campus use of geographic data and geospatial technologies, and how libraries support these uses. The survey was used to capture information regarding geographic needs of their respective campuses, the array of services they offer, and the education and training of geographic information services department staff members. The survey results, along with review of recent literature, were used to identify changes in geographic information services and support since 1997, when a similar survey was conducted by ARL. This new study has enabled recommendations to be made for building a successful geographic information service center within the campus library that offers a robust and comprehensive service and support model for all geographic information usage on campus.

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            "When Data Sharing Gets Close to 100%: What Human Paleogenetics Can Teach the Open Science Movement"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 1st, 2015

            Paolo Anagnostou et al. have published "When Data Sharing Gets Close to 100%: What Human Paleogenetics Can Teach the Open Science Movement" in .

            Here's an excerpt:

            This study analyzes data sharing regarding mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and autosomal polymorphisms in a total of 162 papers on ancient human DNA published between 1988 and 2013. The estimated sharing rate was not far from totality (97.6% ± 2.1%) and substantially higher than observed in other fields of genetic research (evolutionary, medical and forensic genetics). Both a questionnaire-based survey and the examination of Journals' editorial policies suggest that this high sharing rate cannot be simply explained by the need to comply with stakeholders requests. Most data were made available through body text, but the use of primary databases increased in coincidence with the introduction of complete mitochondrial and next-generation sequencing methods. Our study highlights three important aspects. First, our results imply that researchers' awareness of the importance of openness and transparency for scientific progress may complement stakeholders' policies in achieving very high sharing rates. Second, widespread data sharing does not necessarily coincide with a prevalent use of practices which maximize data findability, accessibility, useability and preservation. A detailed look at the different ways in which data are released can be very useful to detect failures to adopt the best sharing modalities and understand how to correct them. Third and finally, the case of human paleogenetics tells us that a widespread awareness of the importance of Open Science may be important to build reliable scientific practices even in the presence of complex experimental challenges.

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              Directions for Research Data Management in UK Universities

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on April 1st, 2015

              JISC has released Directions for Research Data Management in UK Universities.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This report addresses five key topics:

              • Policy development and implementation
              • Skills and capability
              • Infrastructure and interoperability
              • Incentives for researchers and support stakeholders
              • Business case and sustainability

              For each topic we have included a summary of the main current issues, alongside a vision of where the sector should aim to be in five years' time. We then suggest actions for each topic, divided into 'first steps' and then longer term, more complex priorities. Readers should note that each of the five topics do raise interrelated actions, for example, a usage statistics service is flagged as a potential infrastructure solution and this issue arises again as an action area that can help to incentivise research data management and sharing.

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                "Storage is a Strategic Issue: Digital Preservation in the Cloud"

                Posted in Cloud Computing/SaaS, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 17th, 2015

                Gillian Oliver and Steve Knight have published "Storage is a Strategic Issue: Digital Preservation in the Cloud" in .

                Here's an excerpt:

                Worldwide, many governments are mandating a 'cloud first' policy for information technology infrastructures. In 2013, the National Library of New Zealand's National Digital Heritage Archive (NDHA) outsourced storage of its digital collections. A case study of the decision to outsource and its consequences was conducted, involving interviews of the representatives of three key stakeholders: IT, the NDHA, and the vendor. Clear benefits were identified by interviewees, together with two main challenges. The challenges related to occupational culture tensions, and a shift in funding models. Interviewees also considered whether the cultural heritage sector had any unique requirements. A key learning was that information managers were at risk of being excluded from the detail of outsourcing, and so needed to be prepared to assert their need to know based on their stewardship mandate.

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                  "Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare"

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 6th, 2015

                  Peter Kraker et al. have self-archived "Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare."

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  In this paper, we present an analysis of figshare, one of the largest multidisciplinary repositories for research materials to date. We analysed the structure of items archived in figshare, their usage, and their reception in two altmetrics sources (PlumX and ImpactStory). We found that figshare acts as a platform for newly published research materials, and as an archive for PLOS. Depending on the function, we found different bibliometric characteristics. Items archived from PLOS tend to be coming from the natural sciences and are often unviewed and non-downloaded. Self-archived items, however, come from a variety of disciplines and exhibit some patterns of higher usage. In the altmetrics analysis, we found that Twitter was the social media service where research data gained most attention; generally, research data published in 2014 were most popular across social media services. PlumX detects considerably more items in social media and also finds higher altmetric scores than ImpactStory.

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                    "Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles"

                    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 4th, 2015

                    The Data Citation Synthesis Working Group has released the "Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The Data Citation Principles cover purpose, function and attributes of citations. These principles recognize the dual necessity of creating citation practices that are both human understandable and machine-actionable.

                    See also "An Introduction to the Joint Principles for Data Citation."

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                      "A Reputation Economy: Results from an Empirical Survey on Academic Data Sharing"

                      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 4th, 2015

                      Benedikt Fecher et al. have self-archived "A Reputation Economy: Results from an Empirical Survey on Academic Data Sharing."

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      We surveyed 2661 individual academic researchers across all disciplines on their dealings with data, their publication practices, and motives for sharing or withholding research data. The results for 1564 valid responses show that researchers across disciplines recognise the benefit of secondary research data for their own work and for scientific progress as a whole-still they only practice it in moderation. An explanation for this evidence could be an academic system that is not driven by monetary incentives, nor the desire for scientific progress, but by individual reputation-expressed in (high ranked journal) publications. We label this system a Reputation Economy. This special economy explains our findings that show that researchers have a nuanced idea how to provide adequate formal recognition for making data available to others-namely data citations. We conclude that data sharing will only be widely adopted among research professionals if sharing pays in form of reputation. Thus, policy measures that intend to foster research collaboration need to understand academia as a reputation economy. Successful measures must value intermediate products, such as research data, more highly than it is the case now.

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                        "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing"

                        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 2nd, 2015

                        Michael J. Ackerman has published "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing" in The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Interactive Scientific Publishing (ISP) has been developed by the Optical Society of America with support from the National Library of Medicine at NIH. It allows authors to electronically publish papers which are linked to the referenced 2D and 3D original image datasets. These image datasets can then be viewed and analyzed interactively by the reader. ISP provides the software for authors to assemble and link their source data to their publication. But more important is that it provides readers with image viewing and analysis tools. The goal of ISP is to improve learning and understanding of the presented information. This paper describes ISP and its effect on learning and understanding. ISP was shown to have enough educational value that readers were willing to invest in the required set-up and learning phases. The social aspects of data sharing and the enlarged review process may be the hardest obstacles to overcome.

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