Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

"Starting a Research Data Management Program Based in a University Library"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on January 30th, 2015

Margaret Henderson and Teresa L. Knott have self-archived "Starting a Research Data Management Program Based in a University Library."

Here's an excerpt:

As the need for research data management grows, many libraries are considering adding data services to help with the research mission of their institution. The Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Libraries created a position and hired a director of research data management in September 2013. The position was new to the libraries and the university. With the backing of the library administration, a plan for building relationships with VCU faculty, researchers, students, service and resource providers, including grant administrators, was developed to educate and engage the community in data management plan writing and research data management training.

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    "Analyzing Data Citation Practices According to the Data Citation Index"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on January 27th, 2015

    Nicolas Robinson-Garcia et al. have self-archived "Analyzing Data Citation Practices According to the Data Citation Index."

    Here's an excerpt:

    The findings of this study show that data citation practices are far from common in most research fields. Some differences have been reported on the way researchers cite data: while in the areas of Science and Engineering and Technology data sets were the most cited, in Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities data studies play a greater role. 88.1 percent of the records have received no citations, but some repositories show very low uncitedness rates. While data citation practices are rare in most fields, they have expanded in disciplines such as Crystallography or Genomics. We conclude by emphasizing the role that the DCI could play in encouraging the consistent, standardized citation of research data—a role that would enhance its value as a means of following the research process from data collection to publication.

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      "Digital Forensics on A Shoestring: A Case Study from the University of Victoria"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 22nd, 2015

      John Durno and Jerry Trofimchuk have published "Digital Forensics on A Shoestring: A Case Study from the University of Victoria" in Code4Lib Journal.

      Here's an excerpt:

      While much has been written on the increasing importance of digital forensics in archival workflows, most of the literature focuses on theoretical issues or establishing best practices in the abstract. Where case studies exist, most have been written from the perspective of larger organizations with well-resourced digital forensics facilities. However organizations of any size are increasingly likely to receive donations of born-digital material on outdated media, and a need exists for more modest solutions to the problem of acquiring and preserving their contents. This case study outlines the development of a small-scale digital forensics program at the University of Victoria using inexpensive components and open source software, funded by a $2000 research grant from the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL).

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        Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access on January 20th, 2015

        The RECODE project has released Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data.

        Here's an excerpt:

        These policy recommendations are targeted at key stakeholders in the scholarly communication ecosystem, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. They will assist each of the stakeholders in furthering the goals of open access to research data by providing both over-arching and stakeholder-specific recommendations. These function, as suggestions to address and attend to central issues that RECODE identified through the research work.

        The current report thus comprises:

        • summary of project findings
        • overarching recommendations
        • targeted policy recommendations for funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers
        • practical guides for developing policies for funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers
        • resources to expedite the process of policy development and implementation among stakeholders

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          "Building Data Services from the Ground Up: Strategies and Resources"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on January 19th, 2015

          Heather L. Coates has published "Building Data Services from the Ground Up: Strategies and Resources" in the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

          Here's an excerpt:

          There is a scarcity of practical guidance for developing data services in an academic library. Data services, like many areas of research, require the expertise and resources of teams spanning many disciplines. While library professionals are embedded into the teaching activities of our institutions, fewer of us are embedded in research activities occurring across the full life cycle. The significant challenges of managing, preserving, and sharing data for reuse demand that we take a more active role. Providing support for funder data management plans is just one option in the data services landscape. Awareness of the institutional and library culture in which we operate places an emphasis on the importance of relationships. Understanding the various cultures in which our researchers operate is crucial for delivering data services that are relevant and utilized. The goal of this article is to guide data specialists through this landscape by providing key resources and strategies for developing locally relevant services and by pointing to active communities of librarians and researchers tackling the challenges associated with digital research data.

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            "Research Data Management and Libraries: Relationships, Activities, Drivers and Influences"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on December 12th, 2014

            Stephen Pinfield, Andrew M. Cox, and Jen Smith have published "Research Data Management and Libraries: Relationships, Activities, Drivers and Influences " in PLOS ONE.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This paper analyses the contribution of academic libraries to research data management (RDM) in the wider institutional context. In particular it: examines the roles and relationships involved in RDM, identifies the main components of an RDM programme, evaluates the major drivers for RDM activities, and analyses the key factors influencing the shape of RDM developments. The study is written from the perspective of library professionals, analysing data from 26 semi-structured interviews of library staff from different UK institutions. This is an early qualitative contribution to the topic complementing existing quantitative and case study approaches. Results show that although libraries are playing a significant role in RDM, there is uncertainty and variation in the relationship with other stakeholders such as IT services and research support offices. Current emphases in RDM programmes are on developments of policies and guidelines, with some early work on technology infrastructures and support services. Drivers for developments include storage, security, quality, compliance, preservation, and sharing with libraries associated most closely with the last three. The paper also highlights a 'jurisdictional' driver in which libraries are claiming a role in this space. A wide range of factors, including governance, resourcing and skills, are identified as influencing ongoing developments. From the analysis, a model is constructed designed to capture the main aspects of an institutional RDM programme. This model helps to clarify the different issues involved in RDM, identifying layers of activity, multiple stakeholders and drivers, and a large number of factors influencing the implementation of any initiative. Institutions may usefully benchmark their activities against the data and model in order to inform ongoing RDM activity.

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              iPres 2014: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Digital Preservation

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on December 12th, 2014

              The International Conference on Digital Preservation has released iPres 2014: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Digital Preservation.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Papers covered a wide array of preservation topics including migration and emulation, file format management, registries and linked data, funding models, education and training, personal archiving and software-based art, web archiving, metadata and persistent identifiers.

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                2014 Open Data Index

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access on December 10th, 2014

                Open Knowledge has published the 2014 Open Data Index.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                The Index ranks countries based on the availability and accessibility of information in ten key areas, including government spending, election results, transport timetables, and pollution levels.

                The UK topped the 2014 Index retaining its pole position with an overall score of 96%, closely followed by Denmark and then France at number 3 up from 12th last year. Finland comes in 4th while Australia and New Zealand share the 5th place. Impressive results were seen from India at #10 (up from #27) and Latin American countries like Colombia and Uruguay who came in joint 12th.

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