Archive for the 'Digital Culture' Category

Americans’ Views on Mobile Etiquette

Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on August 27th, 2015

The Pew Research Center has released Americans' Views on Mobile Etiquette.

Here's an excerpt:

This Pew Research Center report explores newly released survey findings about Americans' views about the appropriateness of cellphone use in public places and in social gatherings and the way those views sometimes conflict with their own behaviors.

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    Intertwingled: The Work and Influence of Ted Nelson

    Posted in Digital Culture on August 24th, 2015

    Springer has published Intertwingled: The Work and Influence of Ted Nelson as an open access book.

    Here's an excerpt from the Wikipedia page on Ted Nelson:

    Theodor Holm Nelson (born June 17, 1937) is an American pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He coined the terms "hypertext" and "hypermedia" in 1963, and published them in 1965.

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      "15% of Americans Don’t Use The Internet. Who Are They?"

      Posted in Digital Culture on July 30th, 2015

      Monica Anderson and Andrew Perrin have published "15% of Americans Don't Use The Internet. Who Are They?" in Fact Tank.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The latest Pew Research analysis also shows that internet non-adoption is correlated to a number of demographic variables, including age, educational attainment, household income, race and ethnicity, and community type.

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        Mapping the Digital Divide

        Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on July 20th, 2015

        The Council of Economic Advisers, an agency within the Executive Office of the President, has released Mapping the Digital Divide.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Overall, the evidence shows that we have made progress, with the largest gains occurring for those groups that started with the least. While this suggests the beginning of convergence toward uniformly high levels of access and adoption, there is still a substantial distance to go, particularly in our poorest neighborhoods and most rural communities, to ensure that all Americans can take advantage of the opportunities created by recent advances in computing and communications technology.

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          "Technology in Higher Education: Defining the Strategic Leader"

          Posted in Digital Culture on May 12th, 2015

          The EDUCAUSE Review has released "Technology in Higher Education: Defining the Strategic Leader."

          Here's an excerpt:

          In 2014, EDUCAUSE, the association of IT leaders in higher education in the United States, and Jisc, the national organization supporting the use of digital technologies for higher education and research in the United Kingdom, came together to address a common concern —that insufficient attention is paid to understanding the skills required by technology leaders in higher education, both now and in the future. The two organizations convened a working group of 10 U.K. and U.S. IT leaders to address this issue, and this article outlines their findings. It provides the higher education IT community with a model to guide IT professionals at all stages of their careers and to position technology as a central part of advancing the core mission of the academic institution. . . .

          In approaching this topic, the working group asked themselves, "How do we put together something that is meaningful and practical for a relatively diverse audience?" Although the group came to consensus about the traits needed for a successful IT leader, they agreed that the challenge lay in sharing those traits in a way that explains how they work together, how they are used, and, more importantly, how to help people interested in moving into IT leadership. The following model describes the many roles an IT leader plays and provides guidance about how to use the model—for individuals, institutions, and teams.

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            "How to Hack it as a Working Parent"

            Posted in Digital Culture, Libraries, Research Libraries on April 20th, 2015

            Jaclyn Bedoya et al. have published "How to Hack it as a Working Parent" in Code4Lib Journal.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The problems faced by working parents in technical fields in libraries are not unique or particularly unusual. However, the cross-section of work-life balance and gender disparity problems found in academia and technology can be particularly troublesome, especially for mothers and single parents. Attracting and retaining diverse talent in work environments that are highly structured or with high expectations of unstated off-the-clock work may be impossible long term. . . .

            We present some practical solutions for those in technical positions in libraries. Such solutions involve strategic use of technical tools, and lightweight project management applications. Technical workarounds are not the only answer; real and lasting change will involve a change in individual priorities and departmental culture such as sophisticated and ruthless time management, reviewing workloads, cross-training personnel, hiring contract replacements, and creative divisions of labor. Ultimately, a flexible environment that reflects the needs of parents will help create a better workplace culture for everyone, kids or no kids.

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              U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015

              Posted in Digital Culture, Reports and White Papers on April 2nd, 2015

              The Pew Research Center has released U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Today nearly two-thirds of Americans own a smartphone, and 19% of Americans rely to some degree on a smartphone for accessing online services and information and for staying connected to the world around them—either because they lack broadband at home, or because they have few options for online access other than their cell phone.

              Indeed, 7% of Americans own a smartphone but have neither traditional broadband service at home, nor easily available alternatives for going online other than their cell phone.

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                Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age

                Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies on October 13th, 2014

                The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project has released Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age.

                Here's an excerpt:

                To explore the possibilities of the next leap in connectivity we asked thousands of experts and Internet builders to share their thoughts about likely new Internet activities and applications that might emerge in the gigabit age. We call this a canvassing because it is not a representative, randomized survey. Its findings emerge from an "opt in" invitation to experts, many of whom play active roles in Internet evolution as technology builders, researchers, managers, policymakers, marketers, and analysts. We also invited comments from those who have made insightful predictions to our previous queries about the future of the Internet.

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                  "Technology and Digital Scholarship"

                  Posted in Digital Culture, Publishing on July 17th, 2014

                  Robert Harington has published "Technology and Digital Scholarship" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  According to The Guardian, 90% of all the data in the world has been generated over the last two years, but less than 1% of this information has been analyzed. The question for academic publishers and societies is one of comprehension. How do we assimilate these data?

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                    The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025

                    Posted in Digital Culture, Emerging Technologies, Reports and White Papers on May 15th, 2014

                    The Pew Research Center has released The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    This current report is an analysis of opinions about the likely expansion of the Internet of Things (sometimes called the Cloud of Things), a catchall phrase for the array of devices, appliances, vehicles, wearable material, and sensor-laden parts of the environment that connect to each other and feed data back and forth. It covers the over 1,600 responses that were offered specifically about our question about where the Internet of Things would stand by the year 2025. The report is the next in a series of eight Pew Research and Elon University analyses to be issued this year in which experts will share their expectations about the future of such things as privacy, cybersecurity, and net neutrality. It includes some of the best and most provocative of the predictions survey respondents made when specifically asked to share their views about the evolution of embedded and wearable computing and the Internet of Things.

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                      "The Bleeding Hearts Club: Heartbleed Recovery for System Administrators"

                      Posted in Digital Culture on April 11th, 2014

                      David Grant has posted "The Bleeding Hearts Club: Heartbleed Recovery for System Administrators."

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The Heartbleed SSL vulnerability presents significant concerns for users and major challenges for site operators. This article presents a series of steps server and site owners should carry out as soon as possible to help protect the public. We acknowledge that some steps might not be feasible, important, or even relevant for every site, so the steps are given in order both of their importance and the order they should be carried out.

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                        "More Inheritable Rights for Digital Assets"

                        Posted in Digital Culture on April 9th, 2014

                        Charles Phelps has published "More Inheritable Rights for Digital Assets" in the Rutgers Law Record.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Death, as uncomfortable of a subject as it is for some, is a guaranteed component of human existence. . . . There is no denying the psychological and emotional attachment that is affixed with objects that hold memories of loved ones who have passed on before us.

                        Within this frame work, lawyers use legal tools of wills, trusts and estate laws to carry out grantors or inheritors desire on how to bestow certain possessions. However, within all the complexities of bestowing property, lawyers are now increasingly being confronted with how to pass on digital assets.

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