Archive for the 'Digital Curation & Digital Preservation' Category

Data Management Planning: Open Source DMPTool Launched by University of California Curation Center and Others

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on November 2nd, 2011

The University of California Curation Center has announced the launch of DMPTool.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The University of California and several other major research institutions have partnered to develop the DMPTool, a flexible online application to help researchers generate data management plans—simple but effective documents for ensuring good data stewardship. These plans increasingly are being required by funders such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF). The DMPTool supports data management plans and funder requirements across the disciplines, including the humanities and physical, medical and social sciences. . . .

The DMPTool is open source, freely available and easily configurable to reflect an institution's local policies and information. Users of the DMPTool can view sample plans, preview funder requirements and view the latest changes to their plans. It permits the user to create an editable document for submission to a funding agency and can accommodate different versions as funding requirements change. Not only can researchers use the tool to generate plans compliant to funder requirements, but institutions also can use the tool to present information and policies relevant to data management and to foster collaboration among faculty, the institutional libraries, contracts and grants offices, and academic computing. . . .

Project partners include the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at the California Digital Library, the UCLA Library, the UC San Diego Libraries, the Smithsonian Institution, the University of Virginia Library, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, DataONE, and the United Kingdom's Digital Curation Centre. Working collaboratively, these institutions have consolidated their expertise and reduced their costs.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"Federal Funding Agencies: Data Management and Sharing Policies"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 27th, 2011

The California Digital Library has released "Federal Funding Agencies: Data Management and Sharing Policies."

Here's an excerpt:

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-110 provides the federal administrative requirements for grants and agreements with institutions of higher education, hospitals and other non-profit organizations. In 1999 Circular A-110 was revised to provide public access under some circumstances to research data through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Funding agencies have implemented the OMB requirement in various ways. The table below summarizes the data management and sharing requirements of primary US federal funding agencies.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Digital Preservation, SPEC Kit 325

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 26th, 2011

The Association of Research Libraries has released Digital Preservation, SPEC Kit 325. The table of contents and executive summary are freely available.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The survey asked ARL libraries about their digital content, their strategies for preserving that content, and the staff, time, and funding they currently devote to digital preservation. It also asked each responding library to compare its digital preservation activities of three years ago to current activities and project three years into the future. In addition, to better understand the roles of research libraries in the emergent field of digital curation, the survey sought to identify issues that are and are not being addressed through current practices and policies.

This survey revealed, as the digital preservation field is maturing, that most ARL libraries are rising to the challenge of establishing policies, workflows, and infrastructures to systematically preserve their rapidly expanding bodies of digital content. The survey also revealed that most ARL libraries are actively engaging in in-house digital preservation rather than outsourcing it to external parties, thus maintaining their control and ownership over the digital content that they curate.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Open Online Research Data Management Course for Ph.D Students

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 17th, 2011

The Research Data MANTRA project has released a freely available online research data management course for Ph.D students. The course is under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 UK: Scotland License.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement :

The JISC-funded Research Data MANTRA project has produced a course for postgraduate students and early career researchers who work with data and would like to learn more about how to manage it effectively. Course content is geared towards the geosciences, social and political sciences and clinical psychology; however, many of the issues covered apply equally to all research disciplines.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"HathiTrust’s Past, Present, and Future"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 17th, 2011

The HathiTrust has released "HathiTrust's Past, Present, and Future" by John Wilkin.

Here's an excerpt:

My plan today is to talk about HathiTrust's past, present and future. Don't worry—I won't do a history of HathiTrust. My discussion of the "past" will be primarily about the organization's early accomplishments, and begins with a review of our Short- and Long-Term Functional Objects. I'll then talk briefly about a few things in the HathiTrust pipeline, and finally conclude with an overview of some of the larger changes that have taken place since 2008. A point I'd like to emphasize now and throughout is that this is a "libraries writ large" success story. What has happened is something that we accomplished collectively. This is not a story of an external organization—Google, a government agency, or some external champion—doing something for us. This is our story, and one that we need to understand and celebrate.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Tim O’Reilly on Digital Preservation at the 2011 NDIIPP/NDSA Partners Meeting

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 13th, 2011

A digital video of Tim O'Reilly's keynote speech about digital preservation at the 2011 NDIIPP/NDSA Partners Meeting is now available. O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media Inc.

| Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

Investigations on Storage and Versioning of Digital Objects

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 12th, 2011

The Stanford Digital Repository has released four short reports on "open source storage solutions that include the ability to efficiently and securely preserve multiple-version digital objects which contain large binary files."

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"Digital Curation:The Emergence of a New Discipline"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on October 10th, 2011

Sarah Higgins has published "Digital Curation:The Emergence of a New Discipline" in the latest issue of the International Journal of Digital Curation.

Here's an excerpt:

In the mid 1990s UK digital preservation activity concentrated on ensuring the survival of digital material—spurred on by the US report Preserving Digital Information (The Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information, 1996) and developed through JISC-funded activities. Technical developments and a maturing understanding of organisational activity and workflow saw the emphasis move to ensuring the access, use and reuse of digital materials throughout their lifecycle. Digital Curation emerged as a new discipline supported through the activities of the UK's Digital Curation Centre and a number of EU 6th Framework Projects. Digital Curation is now embedded in both practice and research; with the development of tools, and the foundation of a number of support units and academic educators offering training and furthering research. The International

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship |

"Extracting, Transforming and Archiving Scientific Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on August 23rd, 2011

Daniel Lemire and Andre Vellin have self-archived "Extracting, Transforming and Archiving Scientific Data" in arXiv.org.

Here's an excerpt:

It is becoming common to archive research datasets that are not only large but also numerous. In addition, their corresponding metadata and the software required to analyse or display them need to be archived. Yet the manual curation of research data can be difficult and expensive, particularly in very large digital repositories, hence the importance of models and tools for automating digital curation tasks. The automation of these tasks faces three major challenges: (1) research data and data sources are highly heterogeneous, (2) future research needs are difficult to anticipate, (3) data is hard to index. To address these problems, we propose the Extract, Transform and Archive (ETA) model for managing and mechanizing the curation of research data. Specifically, we propose a scalable strategy for addressing the research-data problem, ranging from the extraction of legacy data to its long-term storage. We review some existing solutions and propose novel avenues of research.

| Digital Scholarship |

University of North Texas Receives over $800,000 in Two Grants Related to Digital Data Curation

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Grants, Texas Academic Libraries on August 15th, 2011

The University of North Texas has received over $800,000 in two Institute of Museum and Library Services grants related to digital data curation.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

The University of North Texas Libraries and UNT's College of Information have received more than $800,000 in grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to address the challenges of curating and preserving digital information and new requirements from the National Science Foundation and other agencies that fund university research on long-term management of research data for possible review and use by future researchers and scholars.

Dr. William Moen, associate dean for research in UNT's College of Information, and Dr. Martin Halbert, dean of the UNT Libraries, successfully applied for two grants from IMLS' Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program, which supports efforts to recruit and educate the next generation of librarians and faculty members who prepare them for future careers, as well as supporting research related to library education and staffing needs, curriculum development and continuing education and training. . . .

The first grant of $624,663 from IMLS is for a three-year project to create four graduate-level courses in digital curation and data management. The first two courses will be taught during the summer of 2012. All four courses will be taught beginning in the summer of 2013, said Moen, the principal investigator for the grant. . . .

The second IMLS grant of $226,786 will fund a two-year investigation of the new roles, knowledge and skills that will be required of library and information science professionals to successfully manage research data cited in articles in scholarly journals — not just the publications.

UNT researchers, led by Halbert, will conduct two national surveys of officials at NSF and other funding agencies; college and university vice presidents for research and campus research officers; faculty of library and information science programs; academic librarians; campus IT managers; provosts and chief academic officers; and key researchers at universities and publishers of faculty research. The surveys will focus on college and universities' current data management plans, policies and practices; expectations and beliefs about data management; and preparation needed to archive data.

During the two years of the project, UNT researchers will also conduct focus groups in conjunction with several professional meetings. Personal interviews will be scheduled with selected individuals from the focus groups.

Read more about it at "Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program Grant Announcement June 2011."

| Digital Scholarship |

E-Journal Archiving for UK HE Libraries—White Paper (Final)

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, E-Journals on July 19th, 2011

JISC has released E-Journal Archiving for UK HE Libraries—White Paper (Final).

Here's an excerpt:

The aim of this white paper is to help universities and libraries implement policies and procedures in relation to e-journal archiving which can help support the move towards e-only provision of scholarly journals across the HE sector. The white paper is also contributing to complementary work JISC and other funders are commissioning on moving towards e-only provision of Journals.

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Institutional Repository Bibliography | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 |

European Commission Launches Public Consultation on Digital Scientific Information Access and Preservation

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on July 17th, 2011

The European Commission has launched a public consultation on digital scientific information access and preservation.

Here's an excerpt from the press release:

A public consultation on access to, and preservation of, digital scientific information has been launched by the European Commission on the initiative of European Commission Vice President for the Digital Agenda Neelie Kroes and Commissioner for Research and Innovation, Máire Geoghegan-Quinn. European researchers, engineers and entrepreneurs must have easy and fast access to scientific information, to compete on an equal footing with their counterparts across the world. Modern digital infrastructures can play a key role in facilitating access. However, a number of challenges remain, such as high and rising subscription prices to scientific publications, an ever-growing volume of scientific data, and the need to select, curate and preserve research outputs. Open access, defined as free access to scholarly content over the Internet, can help address this. Scientists, research funding organisations, universities, and other interested parties are invited to send their contributions on how to improve access to scientific information. The consultation will run until 9 September 2011. . . .

Interested parties are invited to express their views on the following key science policy questions:

  • how scientific articles could become more accessible to researchers and society at large
  • how research data can be made widely available and how it could be re-used
  • how permanent access to digital content can be ensured and what barriers are preventing the preservation of scientific output

| Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010 | Electronic Theses and Dissertations Bibliography | Google Books Bibliography | Institutional Repository Bibliography | Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography | Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography 2010 | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview |


Page 30 of 55« First...1020...2829303132...4050...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.