Archive for the 'Institutional Repositories' Category

"Leading Across Boundaries: Collaborative Leadership and the Institutional Repository in Research Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on November 15th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

David M. Seaman has self-archived "Leading Across Boundaries: Collaborative Leadership and the Institutional Repository in Research Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges."

Here's an excerpt:

Two methodologies—content analysis of IR web pages and surveys of library directors and IR developers—were employed to determine if IRs revealed evidence of collaborative leadership. The study populations were those members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Oberlin Group of liberal arts colleges that operated IR services by July 2014 (146 institutions overall). The research examined if IR format, size, age, nomenclature, or technology platform varied between ARL and Oberlin Group members. It asked if there is any difference in the perception of collaborative leadership traits, perceived IR success, or collaborative involvement with stakeholder communities between ARL and Oberlin Group members or between library directors and IR developers. The study found evidence of all six collaborative leadership traits being examined: assessing the environment for collaboration, creating clarity, building trust, sharing power, developing people, and self-reflection.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Lots of Institutional Repositories Keep E-prints Safe

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The seductive allure of a commercial mega repository is two-fold: (1) everything is conveniently in one place, and (2) a company is taking care of the dreary and expensive business of running it.

Everything seems fine: problem solved! That is until something goes wrong, such as the repository being bought and controlled by a publisher or being threatened by lawsuits by a coterie of publishers.

Then it's important to remember: it's a company, and companies exist to make a profit.

Heh, companies are great. I wouldn't have just had that tasty cup of coffee without them. But, we should be very clear about what motivates companies and controls their behavior. And we shouldn't be shocked if they do things that aren't motivated by lofty goals.

I know: institutional repositories are hard work. The bloom is off the rose. But they exist to serve higher education, not make money, and they part of the academic communities they serve. And they can't be bought. And their universities don't often go out of business. And there are a lot of them. And they are not likely to be attractive targets for lawsuits unless something has gone very, very wrong at the local level.

Copyright is complicated. No one is advocating that we ignore it and just shove e-prints into IR's willy-nilly. Getting faculty to understand the ins and outs of e-print copyright is no picnic, nor is monitoring for compliance. But the battle is easier to fight at the local level where one-on-one faculty to librarian communication is possible.

For self-archiving to flourish in the long run, institutional repositories must flourish. By and large, librarians establish, run, and support them, and they are the quiet heroes of green open access who will continue to provide a sustainable and reliable infrastructure for self-archiving.

Share

"Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The University of Pennsylvania Libraries has released "Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress."

Here's an excerpt:

In August, bepress sold their company to Elsevier, a business with a history of aggressive confidentiality agreements, steep price increases, and opaque data mining practices. In their acquisition of bepress and other companies like SSRN and Mendeley, Elsevier demonstrates a move toward the consolidation and monopolization of products and services impacting all areas of the research lifecycle.

We are worried about the long-term impacts from these acquisitions and are concerned that such changes are not in the best interests of the library community. Therefore, we feel obligated to begin exploring alternatives.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

COAR Annual Report 2016/17

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science on August 18th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released the COAR Annual Report 2016/17 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report contains information about strategy and outreach, annual meetings, activities of the Executive Board, Executive Director and Office as well as working and interest group accomplishments. Moreover, the report covers themes like marketing and communications, membership, publications and representation of COAR at major international and regional conferences.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Reflections on ‘Elsevier Acquires bepress’: Implications for Library Leaders"

Posted in E-Prints, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on August 10th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Reflections on 'Elsevier Acquires bepress': Implications for Library Leaders" in the Ithaka S+R blog

Here's an excerpt:

If this is the case, libraries adopting standalone institutional repositories are moving in exactly the wrong direction strategically. Instead, thinking more in terms of a workflow as are Elsevier and the Open Science Framework (and to some degree Digital Science) may be the strongest strategy. If this is so, then the urgent question facing institutional repository managers and strategists is how quickly and thoroughly they can integrate into one (or more) such workflows. And, while such integration may not require the kind of platform-first multi-tenant approach to repositories that Digital Commons and OSF Preprints each seems to have developed, it seems like a strong design approach.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on July 11th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jeanne Hazzard and Stephanie Towery have published "Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

We discovered that our faculty retain nearly none of their pre-print or post-print versions of their published articles, and so we are unable to archive those titles in the repository. Nearly 47% of the articles found were in green journals that allow only pre- or post-print copies. Most faculty were unable to produce versions of their work other than the publisher’s PDF, which many publishers restrict from upload into a repository.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Institutional Repositories as Infrastructures for Long-Term Preservation"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories on June 19th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Helena Francke et al. have published "Institutional Repositories as Infrastructures for Long-Term Preservation" in Information Research.

Here's an excerpt:

The study describes the conditions for long-term preservation of the content of the institutional repositories of Swedish higher education institutions based on an investigation of how deposited files are managed with regards to file format and how representatives of the repositories describe the functions of the repositories.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

An Interactive Map for Showcasing Repository Impacts

Posted in Digital Repositories, DSpace, Institutional Repositories, Open Source Software on April 21st, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Hui Zhang and Camden Lopez have published "An Interactive Map for Showcasing Repository Impacts>" in Code4Lib Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Digital repository managers rely on usage metrics such as the number of downloads to demonstrate research visibility and impacts of the repositories. Increasingly, they find that current tools such as spreadsheets and charts are ineffective for revealing important elements of usage, including reader locations, and for attracting the targeted audiences. This article describes the design and development of a readership map that provides an interactive, near-real-time visualization of actual visits to an institutional repository using data from Google Analytics. The readership map exhibits the global impacts of a repository by displaying the city of every view or download together with the title of the scholarship being read and a hyperlink to its page in the repository. We will discuss project motivation and development issues such as authentication with Google API, metadata integration, performance tuning, and data privacy.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"The Stars Are Aligning for Preprints"

Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 19th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Judy Luther has published "The Stars Are Aligning for Preprints" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Significant events have occurred in rapid succession in the last year signaling that preprints, the author’s original manuscript before submission to a journal, will play a much larger role in the landscape. Developments with DOIs, changes in funder expectations, and the launch of new services indicate that preprints will no longer be limited to the hard sciences and social sciences.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Reference Rot in the Repository: A Case Study of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) in an Academic Library"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Institutional Repositories on April 3rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Mia Massicott and Kathleen Botter have published "Reference Rot in the Repository: A Case Study of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) in an Academic Library" in Information Technology and Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This study examines ETDs deposited during the period 2011-2015 in an institutional repository, to determine the degree to which the documents suffer from reference rot, that is, linkrot plus content drift. The authors converted and examined 664 doctoral dissertations in total, extracting 11,437 links, finding overall that 77% of links were active, and 23% exhibited linkrot. A stratified random sample of 49 ETDs was performed which produced 990 active links, which were then checked for content drift based on mementos found in the Wayback Machine. Mementos were found for 77% of links, and approximately half of these, 492 of 990, exhibited content drift. The results serve to emphasize not only the necessity of broader awareness of this problem, but also to stimulate action on the preservation front.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Practices of Research Data Curation in Institutional Repositories: A Qualitative View from Repository Staff"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories on March 23rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Dong Joon Lee and Besiki Stvilia have published "Practices of Research Data Curation in Institutional Repositories: A Qualitative View from Repository Staff" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The importance of managing research data has been emphasized by the government, funding agencies, and scholarly communities. Increased access to research data increases the impact and efficiency of scientific activities and funding. Thus, many research institutions have established or plan to establish research data curation services as part of their Institutional Repositories (IRs). However, in order to design effective research data curation services in IRs, and to build active research data providers and user communities around those IRs, it is essential to study current data curation practices and provide rich descriptions of the sociotechnical factors and relationships shaping those practices. Based on 13 interviews with 15 IR staff members from 13 large research universities in the United States, this paper provides a rich, qualitative description of research data curation and use practices in IRs. In particular, the paper identifies data curation and use activities in IRs, as well as their structures, roles played, skills needed, contradictions and problems present, solutions sought, and workarounds applied.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Web Interface Security Vulnerabilities of European Academic Repositories"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access on February 27th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Matus Formanek and Martin Zaborsky have published "Web Interface Security Vulnerabilities of European Academic Repositories" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

The given analysis summarizes the status quo of the level of security of web interfaces of selected European academic repositories in the field of library and information science. It focuses on the presence and qualities of the secure HTTPS protocol via SSL/TLS protocols. The security of the transmitted data is particularly important in the network environment of the Internet, especially if log-in user data is transmitted. Disclosure may have a direct impact on saved digital objects and their metadata which together represent the most valuable parts of systems of digital libraries and repositories. Furthermore, the paper points to the most noticeable vulnerabilities of protocols of web interfaces and presents practical recommendations for the expert public. These may contribute to the increase of the level of security of the discussed systems.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Page 1 of 4312345...102030...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.