Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

COAR Annual Report 2016/17

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science on August 18th, 2017

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released the COAR Annual Report 2016/17 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report contains information about strategy and outreach, annual meetings, activities of the Executive Board, Executive Director and Office as well as working and interest group accomplishments. Moreover, the report covers themes like marketing and communications, membership, publications and representation of COAR at major international and regional conferences.

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"Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 16th, 2017

Martin Paul Eve and Ernesto Priego have published "Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?" in tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique.

Here's an excerpt:

Predatory publishing refers to conditions under which gold open access academic publishers claim to conduct peer review and charge for their publishing services but do not, in fact, actually perform such reviews. Most prominently exposed in recent years by Jeffrey Beall, the phenomenon garners much media attention. In this article, we acknowledge that such practices are deceptive but then examine, across a variety of stakeholder groups, what the harm is from such actions to each group of actors. We find that established publishers have a strong motivation to hype claims of predation as damaging to the scholarly and scientific endeavour while noting that, in fact, systems of peer review are themselves already acknowledged as deeply flawed.

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"Reflections on ‘Elsevier Acquires bepress’: Implications for Library Leaders"

Posted in E-Prints, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on August 10th, 2017

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Reflections on 'Elsevier Acquires bepress': Implications for Library Leaders" in the Ithaka S+R blog

Here's an excerpt:

If this is the case, libraries adopting standalone institutional repositories are moving in exactly the wrong direction strategically. Instead, thinking more in terms of a workflow as are Elsevier and the Open Science Framework (and to some degree Digital Science) may be the strongest strategy. If this is so, then the urgent question facing institutional repository managers and strategists is how quickly and thoroughly they can integrate into one (or more) such workflows. And, while such integration may not require the kind of platform-first multi-tenant approach to repositories that Digital Commons and OSF Preprints each seems to have developed, it seems like a strong design approach.

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"Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 8th, 2017

Teresa Auch Schultz has self-archived "Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research."

Here's an excerpt:

The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

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"The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 4th, 2017

Heather Piwowar et al. have self-archived "The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

We estimate that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA (19M in total) and that this proportion is growing, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid. The most recent year analyzed (2015) also has the highest percentage of OA (45%). Because of this growth, and the fact that readers disproportionately access newer articles, we find that Unpaywall users encounter OA quite frequently: 47% of articles they view are OA. Notably, the most common mechanism for OA is not Gold, Green, or Hybrid OA, but rather an under-discussed category we dub Bronze: articles made free-to-read on the publisher website, without an explicit Open license.

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"Elsevier Acquires bepress"

Posted in Digital Repositories, E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on August 3rd, 2017

Roger C. Schonfeld has published "Elsevier Acquires bepress" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Today, Elsevier announces its acquisition of bepress. In a move entirely consistent with its strategy to pivot beyond content licensing to preprints, analytics, workflow, and decision-support, Elsevier is now a major if not the foremost single player in the institutional repository landscape.

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"Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, People in the News on August 1st, 2017

CNI released "Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award."

Here's an excerpt:

An accomplished researcher and information scientist, Van de Sompel is perhaps best known for his role in the development of protocols designed to expose data and make them accessible to other systems, forging links that connect related information, thereby enhancing, facilitating, and deepening the research process. These initiatives include the OpenURL framework (stemming from his earlier work on the SFX link resolver), as well as the Open Archives Initiative (OAI), which included the Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) and the Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE) scheme. Other notable contributions include the Memento protocol, which enables browsers to access earlier versions of the Web easily, and ResourceSync, which allows applications to remain synchronized with evolving content collections.

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Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 24th, 2017

Jisc has released Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2016 we commissioned a research project focused on institutional publishing initiatives which includes academic-led publishing ventures (ALPs) as well as new university presses and library-led initiatives (NUPs). We are pleased to announce the publication of the report 'Changing Publishing Ecologies. A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-led Publishing', which charts the outcomes of this research. . . .

The NUP and ALP strands of the research study were co-ordinated and run in tandem by [Janneke] [Graham] Stone and Adema. This study was informed by a desk top review of current library publishing ventures in the US, Europe and Australia and an overview of international academic-led initiatives and their existing and future directions. The NUP strand consisted of a survey, which collected 43 responses, where the ALP strand was informed by interviews with 14 scholar-led presses. Taking different approaches for these two types of press, the report captures the take-up, reasoning and characteristics of these initiatives, as well as their future plans.

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"Research Output Availability on Academic Social Networks: Implications for Stakeholders in Academic Publishing"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on July 20th, 2017

Mikael Laakso, et al. have self-archived "Research Output Availability on Academic Social Networks: Implications for Stakeholders in Academic Publishing."

Here's an excerpt:

In an effort to map out factors related to ASN [Academic Social Networks] use this article provides a multi-method case study of one business school (Hanken School of Economics, Finland) that incorporates 1) a bibliometric analysis on the full-text availability of research output on ASNs for research published 2012–2014 by Hanken affiliated authors, 2) semi-structured interviews with faculty active in publishing in order to gain insight into motivations for use and use patterns, and 3) a survey distributed to all research-active faculty and doctoral students in order to gain a wider perspective on ASN use.

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"On Sponsorship, Transparency, Scholarly Publishing, and Open Access"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2017

Richard Poynder has published "On Sponsorship, Transparency, Scholarly Publishing, and Open Access" in Open & Shut?

Here's an excerpt:

Sponsorship and lobbying (which often amount to the same thing), for instance, have assisted legacy publishers to co-opt open access. This has seen the triumph of the pay-to-publish model, which has been introduced in a way that has enabled publishers to adapt OA to their needs, and to ringfence and port their excessive profits to the new OA environment. Those researchers who do not have the wherewithal to pay article-process charges (APCs), however, are finding themselves increasingly disenfranchised.

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"Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 18th, 2017

Martin Paul Eve has published "Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities" in the Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) has been shaping and benefiting the scientific community for years now, but this new wave of disseminating research freely has not quite taken hold in the field of humanities. Though humanities publishers could also benefit from an OA model, many have been resistant, citing possible issues with plagiarism or appropriation of an author's work for less than ideal uses. There are also challenges with the cost of publishing OA content, which for humanities could be much higher than in the scientific community due to the length of works produced.

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"Availability of Open Reference Data Nears 50% as Major Societies and Influential Publishers Endorse the Initiative for Open Citations"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 13th, 2017

eLife has released "Availability of Open Reference Data Nears 50% as Major Societies and Influential Publishers Endorse the Initiative for Open Citations."

Here's an excerpt:

Among the 20 publishers who contribute the largest amount of citation data, those who are making their citation data freely available now include: AIP Publishing, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Physical Society, De Gruyter, Emerald, and SciELO. They join Wiley, SAGE, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis and many others who made their reference data available prior to, or as part of, the launch of I4OC. Out of the 20 largest contributors, 13 publishers have now moved their reference data into the public domain, and discussions are ongoing with several other publishers.

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