Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2015

Adelia Grabowsky has published "The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management" in Virginia Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This article examines if and how the integration of OA materials has changed collection and/or access management activities within academic libraries.

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    DSpace@MIT Tops 3 Million Downloads

    Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on May 26th, 2015

    MIT's DSpace@MIT repository has had over 3 million downloads as of the end of April.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT now contains over 16,600 articles, which collectively were downloaded over 90,000 times in April.

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      "The OA Landscape in Summary Form: Act Now!"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 22nd, 2015

      Walt Crawford has published "The OA Landscape in Summary Form: Act Now!" in Walt at Random.

      Here's an excerpt:

      The full set of 29 subject discussions that extend this summer's Library Technology Report issue "The State of Open Access Journals: Idealism and Opportunism" has been posted, and will appear on Fridays from now through September 11, 2015. (Oops: The actual title is Open Access Journals: Idealism and Opportunism.)

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        23 Groups Oppose Elsevier’s New Sharing and Hosting Policy

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 21st, 2015

        SPARC has released "New Policy from Elsevier Impedes Open Access and Sharing."

        Here's an excerpt:

        [Statement]

        On April 30, 2015, Elsevier announced a new sharing and hosting policy for Elsevier journal articles. This policy represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders' open access policies. In addition, the policy has been adopted without any evidence that immediate sharing of articles has a negative impact on publishers' subscriptions.

        Despite the claim by Elsevier that the policy advances sharing, it actually does the opposite. The policy imposes unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months for some journals. It also requires authors to apply a "non-commercial and no derivative works" license for each article deposited into a repository, greatly inhibiting the re-use value of these articles. Any delay in the open availability of research articles curtails scientific progress and places unnecessary constraints on delivering the benefits of research back to the public.

        Furthermore, the policy applies to "all articles previously published and those published in the future" making it even more punitive for both authors and institutions. This may also lead to articles that are currently available being suddenly embargoed and inaccessible to readers.

        As organizations committed to the principle that access to information advances discovery, accelerates innovation and improves education, we support the adoption of policies and practices that enable the immediate, barrier free access to and reuse of scholarly articles. This policy is in direct conflict with the global trend towards open access and serves only to dilute the benefits of openly sharing research results.

        We strongly urge Elsevier to reconsider this policy and we encourage other organizations and individuals to express their opinions.

        The statement is available here and we welcome others to show their support by also endorsing it.

        The statement has been signed by the following groups:

        COAR: Confederation of Open Access Repositories
        SPARC: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
        ACRL: Association of College and Research Libraries
        ALA: American Library Association
        ARL: Association of Research Libraries
        Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
        Australian Open Access Support Group
        IBICT: Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology
        CARL: Canadian Association of Research Libraries
        CLACSO: Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales
        COAPI: Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions
        Creative Commons
        Creative Commons (USA)
        EIFL
        Electronic Frontier Foundation
        Greater Western Library Alliance
        LIBER: European Research Library Association
        National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences
        OpenAIRE
        Open Data Hong Kong
        Research Libraries UK
        SANLiC: South African National Licensing Consortium
        University of St Andrews Library

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          University of Windsor Senate Adopts Open Access Policy

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 19th, 2015

          The University of Windsor Senate has adopted an open access policy.

          Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

          In recognition of the importance of providing open access to Windsor research, and building on the momentum of the Tri-Council Open Access Policy (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC), University Senate passed the University of Windsor's own open access policy (OA), Friday May 8. . . .

          In Canada, the recent release of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications requires grant recipients, as of May 2015, to take steps to ensure that peer-reviewed journal publications arising from supported research are made freely accessible within 12 months of publication.

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            University of Colorado Boulder Adopts Open Access Policy

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 18th, 2015

            The University of Colorado Boulder has adopted an open access policy.

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            "We are delighted that the Chancellor's Executive Committee has approved an Open Access policy for the campus that was endorsed by the Boulder Faculty Assembly, the Council of Deans, and the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor," said University of Colorado Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. "CU-Boulder proudly joins the ranks of other campuses in higher education that have created such policies in the interest of openly sharing their published intellectual assets."

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              "Two Years of Transformative Open Data for Public Good"

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access on May 14th, 2015

              The White House has released "Two Years of Transformative Open Data for Public Good."

              Here's an excerpt:

              Two years ago, President Obama signed an Executive Order (E.O.) to improve how our government shares information for the benefit of the American people. The E.O. meant that for the first time in history, Federal government data was required to be open by default with common standards and machine-readable formats. As a result, government information is now more easily discoverable with the necessary safeguards to prevent release of sensitive and personally identifiable information. . . .

              Today, more than 130,000 datasets reside on data.gov, the repository for the U.S. Government's open data. Data.gov is updated daily with datasets on important issues such as Climate, Public Safety, Health, and Education. Users can find data on the consumer complaints filed against their banks, on-time performance of airlines, or health indicators in their communities such as the prevalence of heart disease or cancer. One reason this is so important is that open data allows businesses, software developers, and anyone else who's interested to create consumer-friendly applications to help us all make better-informed decisions about health care, transportation, energy use, and more. Open data also has other positive impacts, such as fueling creation of new businesses and jobs. And the best part is that we're just getting started.

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                "The Open Access Interviews: John Willinsky"

                Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2015

                Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: John Willinsky" in Open and Shut?.

                Here's an excerpt:

                I was fortunate enough to draw together a wonderful team, led by the Associate University Librarian Brian Owen and technical wonder Alec Smecher at Simon Fraser University Library, who, through the research and development funds we were able to raise, created open source systems for scholarly workflow management and publishing. Together, we created Open Journal Systems (OJS) beginning in 2002, to answer the question of what will it cost to put a journal online. . . .

                Over the course of the next decade, the use of OJS has spread across the globe to the point where—with 8,000 journals actively using it in 2013—we now feel a considerable responsibility at PKP for ensuring that this system provides a high-quality editorial workflow and publishing environment, and all the more so with roughly half of those journals in the Global South.

                So in terms of your question on what PKP has developed into, I would say that it has become primarily but not entirely an open source software development and community support project in a global scale.

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                  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council Unanimously Adopts Open Access Policy

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on May 8th, 2015

                  The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Council has unanimously adopted an open access policy.

                  Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                  Resolution 2015-9: On Endorsing a University Open Access Policy represented more than a year of work by a 35-member faculty Open Access Task Force. Chairs Todd Vision and Julie Kimbrough told the University Gazette that they worked diligently to craft a policy recommendation that could be applied differently according to the needs of various disciplines.

                  UNC-CH is the 51st university or university unit to have adopted an open access policies by a unanimous faculty vote.

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                    "Who Needs Open Access, Anyway?"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 6th, 2015

                    Walt Crawford has published "Who Needs Open Access, Anyway?" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    That title is not my own opinion or question—but it feels like the appropriate title for this odd roundup, covering several dozen items I've tagged over the last two years (or so) as " oa-anti. " The tag doesn't necessarily mean the item was a flat-out attack on open access (even with the typical "some of my best friends are OA, but… " nonsense that's usually now phrased as "I am/this publisher is/a big proponent of OA, however… "). It means that, in skimming the item initially, it seemed to register as something that either seemed to undermine OA or could be used as an attack on OA—or, in some cases, it's discussing somebody else attempting to undermine OA. At the end of this mostly-unsorted set of items, I note a handful of " oa-pro " items for a little balance.

                    You can help support Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large and Crawford's open access research by donating as little as $2 per month via PayPal.

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                      "Thumbs Down for the Freemium Model? Researchers Reject Nature’s Fast Track Peer Review Experiment"

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on May 6th, 2015

                      David Crotty has published "Thumbs Down for the Freemium Model? Researchers Reject Nature's Fast Track Peer Review Experiment" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      NPG launched a four-week trial in their megajournal Scientific Reports. The journal features a Gold open access (OA) business model, where accepted authors pay a $1,495 article processing charge (APC). In the trial, authors willing to pay an additional $750 upfront would get their decision in three weeks. NPG would be able to offer this additional speed by outsourcing the peer review process to Rubriq, a service offered by the private company Research Square.

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                        "Stepping Back from Sharing"

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 5th, 2015

                        Kevin Smith has published "Stepping Back from Sharing" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Two major features of this retreat from openness need to be highlighted. First, it imposes an embargo of at least one year on all self-archiving of final authors' manuscripts, and those embargoes can be as long as four years. Second, when the time finally does roll around when an author can make her own work available through an institutional repository, Elsevier now dictates how that access is to be controlled, mandating the most restrictive form of Creative Commons license, the CC-BY-NC-ND license for all green open access.

                        See also: "Elsevier Updates Its Article-Sharing Policies, Perspectives and Services" and "GET IT IN WRITING: On Elsevier's Revised Sharing/Hosting Policies."

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