Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

Association of Universities in the Netherlands and John Wiley Announce Open Access Agreement

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 5th, 2016

The Association of Universities in the Netherlands and John Wiley and Sons, Inc. have announced an open access agreement.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The negotiations between VSNU and Wiley resulted in an unprecedented agreement covering 2016 – 2019. It provides students and researchers at Dutch universities affiliated to the VSNU with access to all Wiley subscription journal content and enables authors at Dutch universities affiliated to the VSNU to enjoy unlimited open access publication in Wiley's hybrid journals (c.1400), with no publishing charge levied at the article level.

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    "Are ‘Predatory’ Journals Completely Negative, or Also a Sign of Something Positive?"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 4th, 2016

    Jan Velterop has published "Are 'Predatory' Journals Completely Negative, or Also a Sign of Something Positive?" in SciELO in Perspective.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Yet, even with the drawback of being polluted by predatory journals, a functioning market is preferable to a quasi-market, completely dominated by monopolies or monopoly-like players. A system of subscriptions, in which the party who pays—the institutional library—has practically no meaningful choice of what to buy, differs from one of article processing charges (APCs, which make open access possible), in that the party who pays—the author—is the party who does have a meaningful choice of where to submit and publish. So 'flipping' the system from subscriptions to APCs does deliver something much more akin to a functioning market, and 'caveat emptor', 'buyer beware', applies to all markets.

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      "CHORUS Signs Agreement with US Department of Defense to Advance Public Access to Research"

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 4th, 2016

      CHORUS has released "CHORUS Signs Agreement with US Department of Defense to Advance Public Access to Research."

      Here's an excerpt:

      DTIC will employ CHORUS' services to build on open standards, distributed networks and established infrastructure to advance access to scholarly articles reporting on DoD-funded research, as well as enable agency indexing and long-term preservation of those articles. The DoD system will dovetail with the interoperable CHORUS framework, along with Crossref's Open Funder Registry, to provide an article submission workflow for DoD-funded researchers and facilitate public access to all articles that report on DoD-funded research. The agreement enables readers searching DTIC's Public Access Search to follow links that point to publicly available articles/accepted manuscripts in context of the journal where they were published.

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        Rachel Burley Named as Publishing Director, BioMed Central and SpringerOpen

        Posted in Open Access, People in the News, Publishing on February 3rd, 2016

        Springer Nature has named Rachel Burley as Publishing Director, BioMed Central and SpringerOpen.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        Burley was previously with John Wiley & Sons, where she was Vice President and Director of Open Access and Business Development. There, she led the strategic planning and development of Wiley's open access initiatives and was instrumental in identifying and implementing strategic partnerships. Prior to that, Burley was Vice President and Publisher of Life Sciences at Wiley, and spent seven years at Nature Publishing Group.

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          "Open Access 2015: A Year Access Negotiators Edged Closer to the Brink"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing on February 2nd, 2016

          Hilda Bastian has published "Open Access 2015: A Year Access Negotiators Edged Closer to the Brink " in Absolutely Maybe.

          Here's an excerpt:

          It's the year many negotiators got seriously tough on double dipping—charging for both the ability to read (via subscriptions) and for publishing (author processing charges, or APCs).

          Last year it was France getting tough on the toughest negotiator: Elsevier. This year, the Netherlands took it right to the brink of cutting Elsevier loose. It was summed up by a January headline: "Dutch universities dig in for long fight over open access".

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            OAPEN-UK Final Report: A Five-Year Study into Open Access Monograph Publishing in the Humanities and Social Sciences

            Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on February 1st, 2016

            OAPEN-UK has released OAPEN-UK Final Report: A Five-Year Study into Open Access Monograph Publishing in the Humanities and Social Sciences .

            Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

            Examining the attitudes and perceptions of funders, researchers, publishers, learned societies, universities and libraries, our study reiterated the deep strength of feeling and connectedness that each group has with the monograph, especially in terms of identity and reputation. It also found that while many think open access is a good idea in principle, there is uncertainty about how easy it would be to implement the necessary policies and systems to support OA monographs.

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              "Bibliometric and Benchmark Analysis of Gold Open Access in Spain: Big Output and Little Impact"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on January 27th, 2016

              Daniel Torres-Salinas et al. have published "Bibliometric and Benchmark Analysis of Gold Open Access in Spain: Big Output and Little Impact" in El Profesional de la Información.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This bibliometric study analyzes the research output produced by Spain during the 2005-2014 time period in Open Access (OA) journals indexed in Web of Science.. . . . Spain is the second highest ranking European country with gold OA publication output and the fourth highest in Open Access output (9%). . . . Spain's normalized citation impact in Open access (0.72) is lower than the world average and that of the main European countries.

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                "Peer Review in Megajournals Compared with Traditional Scholarly Journals: Does It Make a Difference?"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 26th, 2016

                Bo-Christer Björk and Paul Catani have published "Peer Review in Megajournals Compared with Traditional Scholarly Journals: Does It Make a Difference?" in Learned Publishing.

                Here's an excerpt:

                We report on a small pilot study in which we looked at the citation distributions for articles in megajournals compared with journals with traditional peer review, which also evaluate articles for contribution and novelty. We found that elite journals with very low acceptance rates have far fewer articles with no or few citations, but that the long tail of articles with two citations or less was actually bigger in a sample of selective traditional journals in comparison with megajournals.

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                  Open Science, Open Data, Open Access

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 25th, 2016

                  UKeiG has released Open Science, Open Data, Open Access for non-members.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Open Science is shown to be moving centre-stage, with a rationale of improving efficiency in science; increasing transparency and quality in the research validation process; speeding the transfer of knowledge; increasing knowledge spill-overs to the economy; addressing global challenges more effectively; and promoting citizens' engagement in science and research.

                  Open Data is shown to have undergone a surge in practical development, mirroring the well established repositories for research outputs. The development and application of model policies and of principles is also discussed.

                  The current major developments in Open Access are discussed in detail, including the identification and mirroring of success factors in funders' and institutions' policies and mandates for driving Open Access deposits and the growth in Gold Open Access.

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                    "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data"

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 22nd, 2016

                    Xianwen Wang, Shenmeng Xu, and Zhichao Fang have self-archived "Tracing Digital Footprints to Academic Articles: An Investigation of PeerJ Publication Referral Data."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    In this study, we propose a novel way to explore the patterns of people's visits to academic articles. About 3.4 million links to referral source of visitors of 1432 papers published in the journal of PeerJ are collected and analyzed. We find that at least 57% visits are from external referral sources, among which General Search Engine, Social Network, and News & Blog are the top three categories of referrals. Academic Resource, including academic search engines and academic publishers' sites, is the fourth largest category of referral sources. In addition, our results show that Google contributes significantly the most in directing people to scholarly articles. . . . Correlation analysis and regression analysis indicates that papers with more mentions are expected to have more visitors, and Facebook, Twitter and Reddit are the most commonly used social networking tools that refer people to PeerJ.

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                      Putting Down Roots: Securing the Future of Open Access Policies

                      Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Self-Archiving on January 22nd, 2016

                      Knowledge Exchange has released Putting Down Roots: Securing the Future of Open Access Policies.

                      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                      The summary report; 'Putting down roots: Securing the future of open access policies' includes an analysis of a wide range of OA services and policies currently in use and presents:

                      • an analysis of the common elements found in the current OA policies adopted by research funders and institutions
                      • a set of case studies that illustrate the direct or indirect dependency of OA policies on key services
                      • the views of stakeholders on the key services that enable compliance with OA policies
                      • use cases, presented in accessible formats and language for a non-technical audience
                      • a set of priorities for action if OA policies are to be successfully implemented

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                        "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads"

                        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Social Media/Web 2.0 on January 20th, 2016

                        Christine Okret-Manville has published "Academic Social Networks and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads" in LIBER Quarterly.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        For some years, researchers have been using new ways to communicate and share their work by using academic social networks. In an attempt to foster the development of Open Access in France, the French consortium COUPERIN (Unified Consortium of Higher Education and Research Organizations for Access to Numerical Publications) proposed that academic social networks could be used to convince researchers of becoming more involved in Open Access. To test this hypothesis, a nationwide survey was launched in 2014 to explore whether and how these academic social networks are used to share content, but also how they compare to other Open Access classic tools. Within a month (20 May to 20 June), 1,898 researchers answered this 28-question survey. It was fully completed by 1,698 of them.

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