Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

"Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On | Periodicals Price Survey 2015"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 24th, 2015

Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson have published "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On | Periodicals Price Survey 2015" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) continues to develop, but some financial analysts, such as Sami Kassab, executive director at investment firm Exane BNP Paribas, now believe that OA may no longer be a pressure point on commercial publishing. OA has not been the disruptive force on commercial publishing for which many had hoped.

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    50 Universities or University Units Have Now Adopted Open Access Policies by Unanimous Faculty Votes

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 20th, 2015

    With recent votes by Boston University and University of Delaware faculty, 50 universities or university units, such as schools, have now adopted open access policies by unanimous faculty votes.

    Here's a list from Unanimous Faculty Votes. See the original document for omitted details, and see the recently revised (and praised) Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies (ROARMAP) for a complete list of over 670 open access policies.

    1. February 12, 2008. Harvard University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    2. April 27, 2008. Macquarie University
    3. May 7, 2008, Harvard University, School of Law
    4. June 10, 2008, Stanford University, School of Education
    5. October 2008, University College London (UCL)
    6. February 11, 2009. Boston University
    7. March 6, 2009, Oregon State University, Library Faculty
    8. March 18, 2009, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
    9. May 2009. University of Calgary, division of Library and Cultural Resources
    10. May 2009. University of Pretoria
    11. May 7, 2009, University of Oregon, Library Faculty
    12. May 14, 2009, University of Oregon, Department of Romance Languages
    13. May 14, 2009, Gustavus Adolphus College, Library Faculty
    14. October 1, 2009, York University, librarians and archivists
    15. October, 2009. Universidad de Oriente (Venezuela)
    16. November 18, 2009, Oberlin College
    17. December 2, 2009, University of Northern Colorado, Library Faculty
    18. February 1, 2010, Wake Forest University, Library faculty
    19. February 9, 2010, California Polytechnic State University
    20. February 12, 2010, Oregon State University College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences (COAS)
    21. February 24, 2010, University of Virginia
    22. February 25, 2010, Rollins College Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    23. March 18, 2010, Duke University
    24. March 24, 2010, University of Puerto Rico School of Law
    25. April 19, 2010, San Jose State University
    26. September 27, 2010, University of Northern Colorado
    27. October 2010, Trinity College Dublin
    28. December 22, 2010, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
    29. March 15, 2011, Emory University
    30. May 11, 2011, University of Pennsylvania
    31. September 2011, Princeton University
    32. October 19, 2011, Florida State University
    33. December 8, 2011, Pacific University
    34. January 27, 2012, Bifröst University
    35. February 15, 2012, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto
    36. April 2012, Utah State University
    37. May 21, 2012, University of California, San Francisco
    38. February 6, 2013, Wellesley College
    39. March 4, 2013, College of Wooster
    40. March 5, 2013, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Library faculty
    41. March 21, 2013, University of Rhode Island
    42. April 2013, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University
    43. June 13, 2013, Oregon State University
    44. December 2013, Télé-université (TELUQ), Université du Québec
    45. December 2, 2013, Columbia University, School of Social Work
    46. June 18, 2014, Harvard Medical School
    47. October 7, 2014, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
    48. October 9, 2014, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
    49. February 11, 2015, Boston University
    50. April 6, 2015, University of Delaware

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      DigitalKoans Marks Its Tenth Year of Publication

      Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication on April 20th, 2015

      DigitalKoans, which was established by Charles W. Bailey, Jr. on April 20, 2005, has now been published for ten years. During that time, it has had over 11.1 million visitors, over 50.8 million file requests, and over 36.8 million page views. Excluding spiders, there have been over 6.8 million visitors, over 49.7 million file requests, and over 17 million page views. There have been over 7,100 DigitalKoans posts.

      DigitalKoans was the first publication of Digital Scholarship, a digital press that was founded by Bailey on the same date. In its ten years of operation, Digital Scholarship has had over 14.9 million visitors from 231 counties, over 72 million file requests, and over 52 million page views. Excluding spiders, there have been over 9 million visitors from 231 counties, 43.4 million file requests, and over 24.1 million page views.

      Digital Scholarship has primarily published e-books, low-cost paperbacks, digital bibliographies/webliograpies, and blogs. The publications have been under Creative Commons licenses, usually versions of the Attribution-NonCommercial license. The digital publications have been open access. Digital Scholarship has operated without advertising revenue or other external funding.

      One of the most popular e-books published by Digital Scholarship has been Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography. Excluding spiders, the PDF version has been requested over 475,000 times; with the addition of page views from the HTML version, total use is over 539,000 requests.

      Prior to establishing Digital Scholarship, Bailey worked at the University of Houston Libraries, where he led the digital publishing program from 1989-2007 as Assistant Dean/Director for Systems and subsequently Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development. He established and acted as the first Editor-in-Chief of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (1989-1996), the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. In 1996, he established the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book that had 79 subsequent versions (16 of which were published by Digital Scholarship). These two publications had over 9 million file requests while under Bailey's direction at the UH Libraries.

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        "Open Access Policy: Numbers, Analysis, Effectiveness"

        Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 13th, 2015

        A. Swan et al. have self-archived "Open Access Policy: Numbers, Analysis, Effectiveness".

        Here's an excerpt:

        The PASTEUR4OA project analyses what makes an Open Access (OA) policy effective. The total number of institutional or funder OA policies worldwide is now 663 (March 2015), over half of them mandatory. ROARMAP, the policy registry, has been rebuilt to record more policy detail and provide more extensive search functionality. Deposit rates were measured for articles in institutions' repositories and compared to the total number of WoS-indexed articles published from those institutions. Average deposit rate was over four times as high for institutions with a mandatory policy. Six positive correlations were found between deposit rates and (1) Must-Deposit; (2) Cannot-Waive-Deposit; (3) Deposit-Linked-to-Research-Evaluation; (4) Cannot-Waive-Rights-Retention; (5) Must-Make-Deposit-OA (after allowable embargo) and (6) Can-Waive-OA. For deposit latency, there is a positive correlation between earlier deposit and (7) Must-Deposit-Immediately as well as with (4) Cannot-Waive-Rights-Retention and with mandate age. There are not yet enough OA policies to test whether still further policy conditions would contribute to mandate effectiveness but the present findings already suggest that it would be useful for current and future OA policies to adopt the seven positive conditions so as to accelerate and maximise the growth of OA.

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          "Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 10th, 2015

          SPARC has released "Next Up for Agency Public Access Plans: NOAA" by Heather Joseph.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its plan to create policies ensuring public access to articles and data resulting from its funded research, as required by the February 2013 White House directive. . . .

          The NOAA plan calls for all agency-funded intramural and extramural researchers to deposit final, accepted manuscripts into the agency's repository upon acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal. Unlike many of the other agencies that have released plans to date, NOAA will also require its investigators to submit technical reports, data reports, and technical memoranda into the repository as well—significantly increasing the scope of the materials covered by the agency's policy.

          NOAA will use the OSTP-suggested 12-month embargo period as its baseline. Like other agencies, it will provide stakeholders with a mechanism for petitioning the agency to change the embargo period. The plan indicates that requests must include evidence that outweighs the public benefit of having the embargo remain at one year. . . .

          Currently, funded researchers are required to make data "visible and accessible" within two years. The new plan calls for this time frame to be shortened to just one year. It also indicates that data underlying the conclusions of peer-reviewed articles will most likely be required to be made available at the time of the article's publication, in appropriate repositories (presumably to be designated by NOAA).

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            "Dramatic Growth of Open Access 2015 First Quarter"

            Posted in Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 9th, 2015

            Heather Morrison has published "Dramatic Growth of Open Access 2015 First Quarter" in The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics.

            Here's an excerpt:

            OpenDOAR added 129 repositories for a total of 2,857. The Bielefeld Academic Search Engine added close to 3 million documents for a total of over 71 million documents. Another 7,690 authors joined the Social Sciences Research Network for a total of over 275,000 authors.

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              "NIST Releases Public Access Plan: Agency will Partner with NIH to use PMC Platform"

              Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 9th, 2015

              SPARC has released "NIST Releases Public Access Plan: Agency will Partner with NIH to use PMC Platform" by Heather Joseph.

              Here's an excerpt:

              NIST's plan calls for the agency to partner with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to use PubMed Central (PMC) as the repository for articles. The plan indicated that NIST selected this option in order to "leverage the well-established search, archival, and dissemination features of PMC."

              All NIST-funded researchers will be required to deposit their final peer-reviewed manuscripts into PMC upon acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal and make them available to the public with no longer than a 12-month embargo period. NIST will also accept final published articles where allowed and will follow the NIH's current format requirements. As with the other agencies, NIST will provide stakeholders with a mechanism for petitioning the agency to "shorten or extend the allowable embargo period." NIST envisions that this process would take place through a public petition process run through the Federal Register. . . .

              NIST's plan for providing public access to data consists of three components: requiring data management plans (DMPs), creating an Enterprise Data Inventory (EDI), and establishing a Common Access Platform providing a public access infrastructure.

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                "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Alternative Infrastructures in Scholarly Publishing"

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 6th, 2015

                Carl Lagoze, et al. have published "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Alternative Infrastructures in Scholarly Publishing" in the International Journal of Communication.

                Here's an excerpt:

                For more than three-and-a-half centuries, the scholarly infrastructure—composed of commercial publishers, learned societies, libraries, and the scholars themselves—has provided the foundation functions of certification, registration, access, preservation, and reward. However, over the last two decades, the stability of this infrastructure has been disrupted by profound changes in the technological, economic, cultural, and political climate. We examine the actions of scholars in response to this infrastructure instability through the lens of Hirschman's "exit, voice, and loyalty" framework. We describe the motivations and actions by scholars, especially those with tenure, who have chosen exit from the mainstream scholarly communication infrastructure to a proliferation of newly available alternative infrastructures. However, this option is not practical for all scholars due to the "enforced loyalty" imposed by reward systems based on metrics that are intricately tied to the traditional infrastructure. We examine the alternative of voice exercised by these scholars, combined with the threat of exit that has changed policies that are the source of dissatisfaction with the system.

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                  CHORUS Progress Report, April 2015

                  Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 3rd, 2015

                  CHORUS has released the CHORUS Progress Report, April 2015.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  As of this month, CHORUS is providing access to and information about tens of thousands of articles reporting on federally funded research. CHORUS was also named by the US Department of Energy as part of its public-access solution. The significant progress we've made in the eight months since we moved into full production mode is a great foundation for CHORUS to build on for the benefit of the scholarly community. This report is a summary of our achievements during this pivotal period.

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                    Cogent OA Launches Experimental Freedom APCs Program Letting Authors Choose What to Pay

                    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 3rd, 2015

                    Cogent OA has launched an experimental Freedom APCs Program.

                    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                    Through Cogent OA's Freedom APC model, authors are requested to explore all avenues for funding the publication of their article, such as their funding agency, institution or company and to select a fee from a range of options based on their circumstances and how much they can afford to pay. The final decision rests with the author.

                    Further information: Article Publishing Charges (APCs).

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                      Department of Defense Releases Draft Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research

                      Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on March 19th, 2015

                      The Department of Defense has released a draft Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research .

                      Here's an excerpt from the SPARC announcement:

                      It calls for all DoD-funded researchers to deposit final peer-reviewed manuscripts into the Department's "Defense Technical Information Center" (DTIC) repository. All articles will be made available to the public with no longer than a 12 embargo period. . . .

                      The DoD draft plan doesn't elaborate on reuse rights for articles in the DTIC database, other than to note that articles will be subject to copyright and related license terms. Articles authored by DoD employees, however, will carry a full government use license. . . .

                      One significant place where the DoD's draft plan differs from others released to date is in the area of compliance. The Department indicates that it plans to develop its own "compliance monitor," that will issue "certification tokens" to authors who submit articles and datasets to the DoD under the new policies. The current document doesn't provide any additional details, but the concept of tokens is an intriguing one.

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                        "ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform"

                        Posted in Digital Repositories, EPrints, Open Access, Scholarly Journals on March 16th, 2015

                        Alberto Accomazzi et al. have self-archived "ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform."

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Starting in 2011, the ADS started to systematically collect, parse and index full-text documents for all the major publications in Physics and Astronomy as well as many smaller Astronomy journals and arXiv e-prints, for a total of over 3.5 million papers. Our citation coverage has doubled since 2010 and now consists of over 70 million citations. We are normalizing the affiliation information in our records and, in collaboration with the CfA library and NASA, we have started collecting and linking funding sources with papers in our system. . . . We have rolled out and are now enhancing a new high-performance search engine capable of performing full-text as well as metadata searches using an intuitive query language which supports fielded, unfielded and functional searches. We are currently able to index acknowledgments, affiliations, citations, funding sources, and to the extent that these metadata are available to us they are now searchable under our new platform. The ADS private library system is being enhanced to support reading groups, collaborative editing of lists of papers, tagging, and a variety of privacy settings when managing one's paper collection.

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