Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

COAR Annual Report 2016/17

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science on August 18th, 2017

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released the COAR Annual Report 2016/17 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report contains information about strategy and outreach, annual meetings, activities of the Executive Board, Executive Director and Office as well as working and interest group accomplishments. Moreover, the report covers themes like marketing and communications, membership, publications and representation of COAR at major international and regional conferences.

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"Scientific Data From and for the Citizen"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on August 10th, 2017

Sven Schade et al. have published "Scientific Data From and for the Citizen" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt:

Powered by advances of technology, today's Citizen Science projects cover a wide range of thematic areas and are carried out from local to global levels. This wealth of activities creates an abundance of data, for example, in the forms of observations submitted by mobile phones; readings of low-cost sensors; or more general information about peoples’ activities. The management and possible sharing of this data has become a research topic in its own right. We conducted a survey in the summer of 2015 in order to collectively analyze the state of play in Citizen Science. This paper summarizes our main findings related to data access, standardization and data preservation. We provide examples of good practices in each of these areas and outline actions to address identified challenges.

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"The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 4th, 2017

Heather Piwowar et al. have self-archived "The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

We estimate that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA (19M in total) and that this proportion is growing, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid. The most recent year analyzed (2015) also has the highest percentage of OA (45%). Because of this growth, and the fact that readers disproportionately access newer articles, we find that Unpaywall users encounter OA quite frequently: 47% of articles they view are OA. Notably, the most common mechanism for OA is not Gold, Green, or Hybrid OA, but rather an under-discussed category we dub Bronze: articles made free-to-read on the publisher website, without an explicit Open license.

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"Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, People in the News on August 1st, 2017

CNI released "Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award."

Here's an excerpt:

An accomplished researcher and information scientist, Van de Sompel is perhaps best known for his role in the development of protocols designed to expose data and make them accessible to other systems, forging links that connect related information, thereby enhancing, facilitating, and deepening the research process. These initiatives include the OpenURL framework (stemming from his earlier work on the SFX link resolver), as well as the Open Archives Initiative (OAI), which included the Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) and the Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE) scheme. Other notable contributions include the Memento protocol, which enables browsers to access earlier versions of the Web easily, and ResourceSync, which allows applications to remain synchronized with evolving content collections.

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"Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2017

Arfon M. Smith et al. have self-archived "Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review."

Here's an excerpt:

This article describes the motivation, design, and progress of the Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS). JOSS is a free and open-access journal that publishes articles describing research software. . . . JOSS publishes articles that encapsulate scholarship contained in the software itself, and its rigorous peer review targets the software components: functionality, documentation, tests, continuous integration, and the license. A JOSS article contains an abstract describing the purpose and functionality of the software, references, and a link to the software archive. The article is the entry point of a JOSS submission, which encompasses the full set of software artifacts. Submission and review proceed in the open, on GitHub. Editors, reviewers, and authors work collaboratively and openly. Unlike other journals, JOSS does not reject articles requiring major revision; while not yet accepted, articles remain visible and under review until the authors make adequate changes (or withdraw, if unable to meet requirements). Once an article is accepted, JOSS gives it a DOI, deposits its metadata in Crossref, and the article can begin collecting citations on indexers like Google Scholar and other services. Authors retain copyright of their JOSS article, releasing it under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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"The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2017

Steven Inchcoombe has published "The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Using Springer Nature as a case study this article explores the future of research publishing, with the guiding objective of identifying how such organizations can better serve the needs of researchers and those that support researchers (particularly academic institutions, institutional libraries, research funding bodies and academic societies) as we work together to help advance discovery for the benefit of all. Progress in four key areas is described: improving the publishing process, innovating across science communication, driving the growth and development of open research and adding value beyond publishing. The aim of this article is thus to set out a clear vision of what research publishers can achieve if they especially focus on addressing researchers’ needs and apply their considerable resources and expertise accordingly.

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"Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science on July 2nd, 2017

Stephanie H. Wical and Gregory J. Kocken have published "Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire" in Serials Review.

Here's an excerpt:

Department and program evaluation plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire were examined to see if these documents provide evidence that could be used to justify supporting the publication of peer-reviewed open access articles toward tenure and promotion. . . .

The existing body of scholarship suggests that tenure-line faculty fear publishing in open access journals because it could adversely impact their chances of promotion and tenure. The authors of this current study sought to determine if department and program evaluation plans could influence negative perceptions faculty have of open access journals.

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"A Reputation Economy: How Individual Reward Considerations Trump Systemic Arguments for Open Access to Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 29th, 2017

Benedikt Fecher et al. have published "A Reputation Economy: How Individual Reward Considerations Trump Systemic Arguments for Open Access to Data" in Palgrave Communications.

Here's an excerpt:

In this article, we explore the question of what drives open access to research data using a survey among 1564 mainly German researchers across all disciplines. We show that, regardless of their disciplinary background, researchers recognize the benefits of open access to research data for both their own research and scientific progress as a whole. Nonetheless, most researchers share their data only selectively. We show that individual reward considerations conflict with widespread data sharing. Based on our results, we present policy implications that are in line with both individual reward considerations and scientific progress.

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"Connecting the Persistent Identifier Ecosystem: Building the Technical and Human Infrastructure for Open Research"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Metadata, Open Science on June 16th, 2017

Angela Dappert et al. have published "Connecting the Persistent Identifier Ecosystem: Building the Technical and Human Infrastructure for Open Research" in the Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article draws on the work of the EU-funded THOR project to take stock of the current state of interoperability across the PID landscape and to discuss the next steps towards an integrated research record. Examples illustrate how this interconnectivity is facilitated technically, as well as social and human challenges in fostering adoption. User stories highlight how this network of persistent identifier services is facilitating good practice in open research and where its limitations lie.

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"An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 15th, 2017

Adam Kriesberg et al. have published "An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memo on federally-funded research directed agencies with research and development budgets above $100 million to develop and release plans to increase and broaden access to research results, both published literature and data. The agency responses have generated discussion and interest but are yet to be analyzed and compared. In this paper, we examine how 19 federal agencies responded to the memo, written by John Holdren, on issues of scientific data and the extent of their compliance to the directives outlined in the memo. We present a varied picture of the readiness of federal science agencies to comply with the memo through a comparative analysis and close reading of the contents of these responses.

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"Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on June 9th, 2017

Maxim Grechkin, Hoifung Poon, and Bill Howe have published "Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets" in PLOS Biology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open data is a vital pillar of open science and a key enabler for reproducibility, data reuse, and novel discoveries. Enforcement of open-data policies, however, largely relies on manual efforts, which invariably lag behind the increasingly automated generation of biological data. To address this problem, we developed a general approach to automatically identify datasets overdue for public release by applying text mining to identify dataset references in published articles and parse query results from repositories to determine if the datasets remain private. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on 2 popular National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) repositories: Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Our Wide-Open system identified a large number of overdue datasets, which spurred administrators to respond directly by releasing 400 datasets in one week.

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"Four Decades Of Open Science"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Self-Archiving on June 5th, 2017

Bernard L. Hecker has published "Four Decades Of Open Science" in Nature Physics.

Here's an excerpt:

INSPIRE, the central information resource of the high-energy physics community, pioneered the open dissemination of scientific literature. I

See also: "INSPIRE: Realizing the Dream of a Global Digital Library in High-Energy Physics."

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