Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

"Connecting the Persistent Identifier Ecosystem: Building the Technical and Human Infrastructure for Open Research"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Metadata, Open Science on June 16th, 2017

Angela Dappert et al. have published "Connecting the Persistent Identifier Ecosystem: Building the Technical and Human Infrastructure for Open Research" in the Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article draws on the work of the EU-funded THOR project to take stock of the current state of interoperability across the PID landscape and to discuss the next steps towards an integrated research record. Examples illustrate how this interconnectivity is facilitated technically, as well as social and human challenges in fostering adoption. User stories highlight how this network of persistent identifier services is facilitating good practice in open research and where its limitations lie.

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"An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 15th, 2017

Adam Kriesberg et al. have published "An Analysis of Federal Policy on Public Access to Scientific Research Data" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memo on federally-funded research directed agencies with research and development budgets above $100 million to develop and release plans to increase and broaden access to research results, both published literature and data. The agency responses have generated discussion and interest but are yet to be analyzed and compared. In this paper, we examine how 19 federal agencies responded to the memo, written by John Holdren, on issues of scientific data and the extent of their compliance to the directives outlined in the memo. We present a varied picture of the readiness of federal science agencies to comply with the memo through a comparative analysis and close reading of the contents of these responses.

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"Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on June 9th, 2017

Maxim Grechkin, Hoifung Poon, and Bill Howe have published "Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets" in PLOS Biology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open data is a vital pillar of open science and a key enabler for reproducibility, data reuse, and novel discoveries. Enforcement of open-data policies, however, largely relies on manual efforts, which invariably lag behind the increasingly automated generation of biological data. To address this problem, we developed a general approach to automatically identify datasets overdue for public release by applying text mining to identify dataset references in published articles and parse query results from repositories to determine if the datasets remain private. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on 2 popular National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) repositories: Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Our Wide-Open system identified a large number of overdue datasets, which spurred administrators to respond directly by releasing 400 datasets in one week.

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"Four Decades Of Open Science"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Self-Archiving on June 5th, 2017

Bernard L. Hecker has published "Four Decades Of Open Science" in Nature Physics.

Here's an excerpt:

INSPIRE, the central information resource of the high-energy physics community, pioneered the open dissemination of scientific literature. I

See also: "INSPIRE: Realizing the Dream of a Global Digital Library in High-Energy Physics."

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An Analysis of Open Data and Open Science Policies in Europe, May 2017

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on June 2nd, 2017

SPARC Europe has released An Analysis of Open Data and Open Science Policies in Europe, May 2017 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Among the report’s most striking findings: 11 of the 28 European Union member states, as well as Norway and Switzerland, have national, research data-related policies in place. Of these, all were implemented in the past eight years, with most having taken effect recently. In about half of the countries, research data is covered under the same policy that applies to Open Access or Open Science.

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"Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2017

Meg Byrne has published "Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE" in the EveryONE Blog

Here's an excerpt:

PLOS ONE has published over 65,000 papers with a DAS in the three years since the open data policy was put in place. We were initially concerned we would not be able to consider a significant number of submissions because authors could not share data, but this did not turn out to be the case. Since the implementation of the updated policy, we estimate staff have rejected less than 0.1% of submissions due to authors’ unwillingness or inability to share data. What we have seen is a growing acceptance of data sharing and evolution of data sharing practices. For instance, there has been a steady growth in datasets available directly via public data repositories such as the NCBI databases, Figshare or Dryad. While the proportion of articles with a data availability statement linking to one of these repositories is still relatively low, at around 20% in 2016, the growth is encouraging.

Another 60% of articles include data in the main text and supplementary information. While we strongly recommend discipline-specific open repositories where they exist, we also deposit the supporting information files, figures, and tables included with every article to Figshare and give each of these its own DOI. Thus, in addition to being available via the PLOS ONE article, this content is also available through an external data repository. The remaining 20% of papers have data available upon request due to restrictions acceptable under our policy, including restrictions related to sensitive data or because the data are owned by and available from a third party.

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"The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author’s Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 20th, 2017

David Giofrè et al. have published "The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author's Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

From January 2014, Psychological Science introduced new submission guidelines that encouraged the use of effect sizes, estimation, and meta-analysis (the "new statistics"), required extra detail of methods, and offered badges for use of open science practices. We investigated the use of these practices in empirical articles published by Psychological Science and, for comparison, by the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, during the period of January 2013 to December 2015. The use of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) was extremely high at all times and in both journals. In Psychological Science, the use of confidence intervals increased markedly overall, from 28% of articles in 2013 to 70% in 2015, as did the availability of open data (3 to 39%) and open materials (7 to 31%). The other journal showed smaller or much smaller changes. Our findings suggest that journal-specific submission guidelines may encourage desirable changes in authors’ practices.

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"The World’s Approach towards Publishing in Springer and Elsevier’s APC-Funded Open Access Journals "

Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 13th, 2017

College & Research Libraries has released an e-print of "The World's Approach towards Publishing in Springer and Elsevier's APC-Funded Open Access Journals.

Here's an excerpt:

The Netherlands, Norway and Poland ranked highest in terms of their OA shares. This can be attributed to the financial resources allocated to publication in general, and publishing in OA journals, in particular, by the countries. All developed countries and a large number of scientifically lagging and developing nations were found to publish OA articles in the APC journals. The OA papers have been exponentially growing across all the country scientific groups annually. Although the advanced nations published the lion share of the OA-APC papers and exhibited the highest growth, the under-development groups have been displaying high OA growth rates.

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"Open Data, [Open] Access: Linking Data Sharing and Article Sharing in the Earth Sciences"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 12th, 2017

Samantha Teplitzky has published "Open Data, [Open] Access: Linking Data Sharing and Article Sharing in the Earth Science" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION The norms of a research community influence practice, and norms of openness and sharing can be shaped to encourage researchers who share in one aspect of their research cycle to share in another. Different sets of mandates have evolved to require that research data be made public, but not necessarily articles resulting from that collected data. In this paper, I ask to what extent publications in the Earth Sciences are more likely to be open access (in all of its definitions) when researchers open their data through the Pangaea repository. METHODS Citations from Pangaea data sets were studied to determine the level of open access for each article. RESULTS This study finds that the proportion of gold open access articles linked to the repository increased 25% from 2010 to 2015 and 75% of articles were available from multiple open sources.

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Open Data: The Researcher Perspective

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on April 7th, 2017

Elsevier and the Centre for Science and Technology Studies have released Open Data: The Researcher Perspective .

Here's an excerpt:

Combining information from a bibliometric analysis, a survey and case studies, this report examines how researchers share data, the attitudes of researchers toward sharing data, and why researchers might be reticent to share data.

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"Openness as Social Praxis"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Open Source Software on April 6th, 2017

Matthew Longshore Smith and Ruhiya Seward have published "Openness as Social Praxis" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt:

The paper "Fifty shades of open" by Pomerantz and Peek (2016) highlighted the increasing ambiguity and even confusion surrounding this term. This article builds on Pomerantz and Peek’s attempt to disambiguate the term by offering an alternative understanding to openness —that of social praxis. More specifically, our framing can be broken down into three social processes: open production, open distribution, and open consumption. Each process shares two traits that make them open: you don’t have to pay (free price), and anyone can participate (non-discrimination) in these processes.

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"European Commission Considering Leap into Open-Access Publishing"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 31st, 2017

Martin Enserink has published "European Commission Considering Leap into Open-Access Publishing" in Science.

Here's an excerpt:

The European Commission, which spends more than £10 billion annually on research, may follow two other big league funders, the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and set up a “publishing platform” for the scientists it funds, in an attempt to accelerate the transition to open-access publishing in Europe.

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