Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

"Q&A with PLOS Co-founder Michael Eisen"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 13th, 2017

Richard Poynder has published "Q&A with PLOS Co-founder Michael Eisen" in Open and Shut?.

Here's an excerpt:

ME [Michael Eisen]: The most important thing to do now is to get publishers—commercial and non-profit—out of the process. The whole industry is unnecessary and needlessly cumbersome and expensive. We should all just publish in places like bioRxiv (assuming its software gets better and produces finished documents people are happy to read) and do all peer review post publication. There should be little or no money transacted in the process—the infrastructure should be subsidized so it’s free to both publish and access all the content.

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Lots of Institutional Repositories Keep E-prints Safe

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017

The seductive allure of a commercial mega repository is two-fold: (1) everything is conveniently in one place, and (2) a company is taking care of the dreary and expensive business of running it.

Everything seems fine: problem solved! That is until something goes wrong, such as the repository being bought and controlled by a publisher or being threatened by lawsuits by a coterie of publishers.

Then it's important to remember: it's a company, and companies exist to make a profit.

Heh, companies are great. I wouldn't have just had that tasty cup of coffee without them. But, we should be very clear about what motivates companies and controls their behavior. And we shouldn't be shocked if they do things that aren't motivated by lofty goals.

I know: institutional repositories are hard work. The bloom is off the rose. But they exist to serve higher education, not make money, and they part of the academic communities they serve. And they can't be bought. And their universities don't often go out of business. And there are a lot of them. And they are not likely to be attractive targets for lawsuits unless something has gone very, very wrong at the local level.

Copyright is complicated. No one is advocating that we ignore it and just shove e-prints into IR's willy-nilly. Getting faculty to understand the ins and outs of e-print copyright is no picnic, nor is monitoring for compliance. But the battle is easier to fight at the local level where one-on-one faculty to librarian communication is possible.

For self-archiving to flourish in the long run, institutional repositories must flourish. By and large, librarians establish, run, and support them, and they are the quiet heroes of green open access who will continue to provide a sustainable and reliable infrastructure for self-archiving.

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"ResearchGate Backs Down"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 11th, 2017

Lindsay McKenzie has published "ResearchGate Backs Down" in Inside Higher Ed.

ResearchGate is removing "large numbers" of e-prints to comply with publisher demands.

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Coalition for Responsible Sharing’s Statement: "Publishers and Societies Take Action against ResearchGate’s Copyright Infringements"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, E-Prints, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 6th, 2017

The Coalition for Responsible Sharing has released "Publishers and Societies Take Action against ResearchGate’s Copyright Infringements."

Here's an excerpt:

Numerous attempts to agree with ResearchGate on amicable solutions, including signing up to the Voluntary Principles of Article Sharing on Scholarly Collaboration Networks and implementing a user-friendly technical solution, remained unsuccessful. Members of the Coalition for Responsible Sharing are therefore now resorting to formal means to alter ResearchGate's damaging practices. The coalition members include the American Chemical Society, Brill, Elsevier, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer. These organizations will begin to issue takedown notices to ResearchGate requesting that infringing content be removed from the site. Concurrently, The American Chemical Society and Elsevier are asking the courts to clarify ResearchGate's copyright responsibility.

See also: "ResearchGate: Publishers Take Formal Steps to Force Copyright Compliance."

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"Publishers Taking Legal Action against ResearchGate to Limit Unlicensed Paper Sharing on Networking Site"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 5th, 2017

Jyllian Kemsley and Andrea Widener have published "Publishers Taking Legal Action against ResearchGate to Limit Unlicensed Paper Sharing on Networking Site" in Chemical & Engineering News.

Publishers could issue "millions" of take-down notices to ResearchGate.

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COAR Annual Report 2016/17

Posted in Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science on August 18th, 2017

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories has released the COAR Annual Report 2016/17 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The report contains information about strategy and outreach, annual meetings, activities of the Executive Board, Executive Director and Office as well as working and interest group accomplishments. Moreover, the report covers themes like marketing and communications, membership, publications and representation of COAR at major international and regional conferences.

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"Scientific Data From and for the Citizen"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on August 10th, 2017

Sven Schade et al. have published "Scientific Data From and for the Citizen" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt:

Powered by advances of technology, today's Citizen Science projects cover a wide range of thematic areas and are carried out from local to global levels. This wealth of activities creates an abundance of data, for example, in the forms of observations submitted by mobile phones; readings of low-cost sensors; or more general information about peoples’ activities. The management and possible sharing of this data has become a research topic in its own right. We conducted a survey in the summer of 2015 in order to collectively analyze the state of play in Citizen Science. This paper summarizes our main findings related to data access, standardization and data preservation. We provide examples of good practices in each of these areas and outline actions to address identified challenges.

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"The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 4th, 2017

Heather Piwowar et al. have self-archived "The State of OA: A Large-Scale Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Open Access Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

We estimate that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA (19M in total) and that this proportion is growing, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid. The most recent year analyzed (2015) also has the highest percentage of OA (45%). Because of this growth, and the fact that readers disproportionately access newer articles, we find that Unpaywall users encounter OA quite frequently: 47% of articles they view are OA. Notably, the most common mechanism for OA is not Gold, Green, or Hybrid OA, but rather an under-discussed category we dub Bronze: articles made free-to-read on the publisher website, without an explicit Open license.

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"Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, People in the News on August 1st, 2017

CNI released "Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award."

Here's an excerpt:

An accomplished researcher and information scientist, Van de Sompel is perhaps best known for his role in the development of protocols designed to expose data and make them accessible to other systems, forging links that connect related information, thereby enhancing, facilitating, and deepening the research process. These initiatives include the OpenURL framework (stemming from his earlier work on the SFX link resolver), as well as the Open Archives Initiative (OAI), which included the Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) and the Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE) scheme. Other notable contributions include the Memento protocol, which enables browsers to access earlier versions of the Web easily, and ResourceSync, which allows applications to remain synchronized with evolving content collections.

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"Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 12th, 2017

Arfon M. Smith et al. have self-archived "Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design And First-Year Review."

Here's an excerpt:

This article describes the motivation, design, and progress of the Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS). JOSS is a free and open-access journal that publishes articles describing research software. . . . JOSS publishes articles that encapsulate scholarship contained in the software itself, and its rigorous peer review targets the software components: functionality, documentation, tests, continuous integration, and the license. A JOSS article contains an abstract describing the purpose and functionality of the software, references, and a link to the software archive. The article is the entry point of a JOSS submission, which encompasses the full set of software artifacts. Submission and review proceed in the open, on GitHub. Editors, reviewers, and authors work collaboratively and openly. Unlike other journals, JOSS does not reject articles requiring major revision; while not yet accepted, articles remain visible and under review until the authors make adequate changes (or withdraw, if unable to meet requirements). Once an article is accepted, JOSS gives it a DOI, deposits its metadata in Crossref, and the article can begin collecting citations on indexers like Google Scholar and other services. Authors retain copyright of their JOSS article, releasing it under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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"The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 11th, 2017

Steven Inchcoombe has published "The Changing Role of Research Publishing: A Case Study from Springer Nature" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

Using Springer Nature as a case study this article explores the future of research publishing, with the guiding objective of identifying how such organizations can better serve the needs of researchers and those that support researchers (particularly academic institutions, institutional libraries, research funding bodies and academic societies) as we work together to help advance discovery for the benefit of all. Progress in four key areas is described: improving the publishing process, innovating across science communication, driving the growth and development of open research and adding value beyond publishing. The aim of this article is thus to set out a clear vision of what research publishers can achieve if they especially focus on addressing researchers’ needs and apply their considerable resources and expertise accordingly.

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"Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science on July 2nd, 2017

Stephanie H. Wical and Gregory J. Kocken have published "Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire" in Serials Review.

Here's an excerpt:

Department and program evaluation plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire were examined to see if these documents provide evidence that could be used to justify supporting the publication of peer-reviewed open access articles toward tenure and promotion. . . .

The existing body of scholarship suggests that tenure-line faculty fear publishing in open access journals because it could adversely impact their chances of promotion and tenure. The authors of this current study sought to determine if department and program evaluation plans could influence negative perceptions faculty have of open access journals.

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