Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

"An Update on Peer Review and Research Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 26th, 2016

Fiona Murphy has published "An Update on Peer Review and Research Data" in Learned Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

As has been outlined here, the question of how to review research data and incorporate this into the publication process remains a knotty one. Various groups have made a certain amount of progress with potential recommendations, and domain-related and technical support functions are also emerging. However, the critical mass of active researchers has so far failed to engage.

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    Open Science, Open Data, Open Access

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 25th, 2016

    UKeiG has released Open Science, Open Data, Open Access for non-members.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Open Science is shown to be moving centre-stage, with a rationale of improving efficiency in science; increasing transparency and quality in the research validation process; speeding the transfer of knowledge; increasing knowledge spill-overs to the economy; addressing global challenges more effectively; and promoting citizens' engagement in science and research.

    Open Data is shown to have undergone a surge in practical development, mirroring the well established repositories for research outputs. The development and application of model policies and of principles is also discussed.

    The current major developments in Open Access are discussed in detail, including the identification and mirroring of success factors in funders' and institutions' policies and mandates for driving Open Access deposits and the growth in Gold Open Access.

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      "Open Data in Global Environmental Research: The Belmont Forum’s Open Data Survey"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 20th, 2016

      Birgit Schmidt, Birgit Gemeinholzer, and Andrew Treloar have published "Open Data in Global Environmental Research: The Belmont Forum's Open Data Survey" in PLOS ONE.

      Here's an excerpt:

      This paper presents the findings of the Belmont Forum's survey on Open Data which targeted the global environmental research and data infrastructure community. It highlights users' perceptions of the term "open data", expectations of infrastructure functionalities, and barriers and enablers for the sharing of data. A wide range of good practice examples was pointed out by the respondents which demonstrates a substantial uptake of data sharing through e-infrastructures and a further need for enhancement and consolidation. Among all policy responses, funder policies seem to be the most important motivator. This supports the conclusion that stronger mandates will strengthen the case for data sharing.

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        Making Open Science a Reality

        Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Reports and White Papers on September 30th, 2015

        The OECD has released Making Open Science a Reality.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This report, Making open science a reality reviews the progress in OECD countries in making the results of publicly funded research, namely scientific publications and research data openly accessible to researchers and innovators alike. The report i) reviews the policy rationale behind open science and open data; ii) discusses and presents evidence on the impacts of policies to promote open science and open data; iii) explores the legal barriers and solutions to greater access to research data; iv) provides a description of the key actors involved in open science and their roles; and finally v) assesses progress in OECD and selected non-member countries based a survey of recent policy trends.

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          "Data Rights and Responsibilities: A Human Rights Perspective on Data Sharing"

          Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Access, Open Science on September 11th, 2015

          Theresa L. Harris and Jessica M. Wyndham have published "Data Rights and Responsibilities: A Human Rights Perspective on Data Sharing " in the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.

          Here's an excerpt:

          A human-rights-based analysis can be a useful tool for the scientific community and policy makers as they develop codes of conduct, harmonized standards, and national policies for data sharing. The human rights framework provides a shared set of values and norms across borders, defines rights and responsibilities of various actors involved in data sharing, addresses the potential harms as well as the benefits of data sharing, and offers a framework for balancing competing values. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications offers a particularly helpful lens through which to view data as both a tool of scientific inquiry to which access is vital and as a product of science from which everyone should benefit.

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            "Open Access to a High-Quality, Impartial, Point-of-Care Medical Summary Would Save Lives: Why Does It Not Exist?"

            Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on September 1st, 2015

            James Heilman has published "Open Access to a High-Quality, Impartial, Point-of-Care Medical Summary Would Save Lives: Why Does It Not Exist?" in PLOS Medicine.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Summary Points

            • Currently no open access point-of-care (POC) medical summary aimed at a professional audience exists.
            • Some nonprofit and multiple professional, for-profit POC medical summaries are frequently accessed by clinicians and policymakers.
            • Efforts to create open access POC summaries have been stymied by the difficulty of attracting high-quality contributors.
            • The open access medical publishing community can create this resource with engaged donors, crowd-sourcing, and technology.

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              Open Science, Open Questions

              Posted in Open Access, Open Science on August 31st, 2015

              IBICT and Unirio have released Open Science, Open Questions.

              Here's an excerpt:

              It is hoped that this publication will provide an overview of topics and issues that both trace and permeate the topic of open science nowadays from different perspectives and points of view. Above all, it is hoped that it might instigate further reflection and foster new ways of producing and circulating knowledge. Thus, it is geared not only towards the academic world, but also to a broader range of social actors that concern themselves with the democratisation of knowledge and information.

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                Take Action: Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act Being Marked Up

                Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 29th, 2015

                The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act is being marked up.

                Here's an excerpt from the SPARC announcement:

                After a month of intense conversations and negotiations, the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) will bring the "Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act" up for mark-up on Wednesday, July 29th. The language that will be considered is an amended version of FASTR, officially known as the 'Johnson-Carper Substitute Amendment,' which was officially filed by the HSGAC leadership late on Friday afternoon, per committee rules.

                There are two major changes from the original bill language to be particularly aware of. Specifically, the amendment

                • Replaces the six month embargo period with "no later than 12 months, but preferably sooner," as anticipated; and
                • Provides a mechanism for stakeholders to petition federal agencies to 'adjust' the embargo period if the 12 months does not serve "the public, industries, and the scientific community."

                To support the bill and communicate your concerns, see: "Help Move FASTR" "Secure Open Access to Taxpayer-Funded Research"

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                  "Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology"

                  Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on July 22nd, 2015

                  Ronald D Vale has self-archived "Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology."

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past thirty years. Considerably more experimental data is now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of Ph.D. training. Since publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for the life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and scientific community.

                  See also: "Thoughts on Ron Vale's 'Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology'" by Michael Eisen.

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                    "When Data Sharing Gets Close to 100%: What Human Paleogenetics Can Teach the Open Science Movement"

                    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 1st, 2015

                    Paolo Anagnostou et al. have published "When Data Sharing Gets Close to 100%: What Human Paleogenetics Can Teach the Open Science Movement" in .

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    This study analyzes data sharing regarding mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and autosomal polymorphisms in a total of 162 papers on ancient human DNA published between 1988 and 2013. The estimated sharing rate was not far from totality (97.6% ± 2.1%) and substantially higher than observed in other fields of genetic research (evolutionary, medical and forensic genetics). Both a questionnaire-based survey and the examination of Journals' editorial policies suggest that this high sharing rate cannot be simply explained by the need to comply with stakeholders requests. Most data were made available through body text, but the use of primary databases increased in coincidence with the introduction of complete mitochondrial and next-generation sequencing methods. Our study highlights three important aspects. First, our results imply that researchers' awareness of the importance of openness and transparency for scientific progress may complement stakeholders' policies in achieving very high sharing rates. Second, widespread data sharing does not necessarily coincide with a prevalent use of practices which maximize data findability, accessibility, useability and preservation. A detailed look at the different ways in which data are released can be very useful to detect failures to adopt the best sharing modalities and understand how to correct them. Third and finally, the case of human paleogenetics tells us that a widespread awareness of the importance of Open Science may be important to build reliable scientific practices even in the presence of complex experimental challenges.

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                      "Persistent, Global Identity for Scientists via ORCID"

                      Posted in Metadata, Open Science on February 24th, 2015

                      August E. Evrard et al. have self-archived "Persistent, Global Identity for Scientists via ORCID."

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Scientists have an inherent interest in claiming their contributions to the scholarly record, but the fragmented state of identity management across the landscape of astronomy, physics, and other fields makes highlighting the contributions of any single individual a formidable and often frustratingly complex task. The problem is exacerbated by the expanding variety of academic research products and the growing footprints of large collaborations and interdisciplinary teams. In this essay, we outline the benefits of a unique scholarly identifier with persistent value on a global scale and we review astronomy and physics engagement with the Open Researcher and Contributor iD (ORCID) service as a solution.

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                        "Why Principal Investigators Funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health Publish in the Public Library of Science Journals"

                        Posted in Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on January 23rd, 2015

                        Nancy Pontika has published "Why Principal Investigators Funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health Publish in the Public Library of Science Journals" in Information Research.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        The Institutes-funded investigators submitted to the Public Library of Science journals because they favour the high impact factor, fast publication speed, fair peer-review system and the articles/ immediate open access availability.

                        Conclusions. The requirements of the National Institutes' public access policy do not influence the investigators' decision to submit to one of the Public Library of Science journals and do not increase their familiarity with open access publishing options.

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