Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

"The Journal Article as a Means to Share Data: A Content Analysis of Supplementary Materials from Two Disciplines"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016

Jeremy Kenyon, Nancy Sprague, and Edward Flathers have published "The Journal Article as a Means to Share Data: a Content Analysis of Supplementary Materials from Two Disciplines" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION The practice of publishing supplementary materials with journal articles is becoming increasingly prevalent across the sciences. We sought to understand better the content of these materials by investigating the differences between the supplementary materials published by authors in the geosciences and plant sciences. METHODS We conducted a random stratified sampling of four articles from each of 30 journals published in 2013. In total, we examined 297 supplementary data files for a range of different factors. RESULTS We identified many similarities between the practices of authors in the two fields, including the formats used (Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, PDFs) and the small size of the files. There were differences identified in the content of the supplementary materials: the geology materials contained more maps and machine-readable data; the plant science materials included much more tabular data and multimedia content. DISCUSSION Our results suggest that the data shared through supplementary files in these fields may not lend itself to reuse. Code and related scripts are not often shared, nor is much 'raw' data. Instead, the files often contain summary data, modified for human reading and use. CONCLUSION Given these and other differences, our results suggest implications for publishers, librarians, and authors, and may require shifts in behavior if effective data sharing is to be realized.

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Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 9th, 2016

Stephen Curry has self-archived "Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?"

Here's an excerpt:

To set the scene, I will begin with a brief description of the open access movement and recent policy initiatives before discussing their impact on the attitudes of scientists towards the broader open science agenda and public engagement. I will then consider the effects of open access (and allied moves) on the authority and independence of science—concepts that are perturbed by the increasingly blurred boundary between the academy and the public. Lastly, I will focus attention on the various publics that are actively seeking to engage with science and scientists, mainly through advocacy groups or the growing ranks of citizen scientists; here, while the impact of open access appears relatively modest, it has the capacity to spring surprises that point to future growth.

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"A Vision for Open Cyber-Scholarly Infrastructures"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on June 8th, 2016

Costantino Thanos has published "A Vision for Open Cyber-Scholarly Infrastructures" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

The characteristics of modern science, i.e., data-intensive, multidisciplinary, open, and heavily dependent on Internet technologies, entail the creation of a linked scholarly record that is online and open. Instrumental in making this vision happen is the development of the next generation of Open Cyber-Scholarly Infrastructures (OCIs), i.e., enablers of an open, evolvable, and extensible scholarly ecosystem. The paper delineates the evolving scenario of the modern scholarly record and describes the functionality of future OCIs as well as the radical changes in scholarly practices including new reading, learning, and information-seeking practices enabled by OCIs.

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"Fifty Shades of Open"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Open Source Software on May 3rd, 2016

Jeffrey Pomerantz and Robin Peek have published "Fifty Shades of Open" in First Monday.

Here's an excerpt:

Open source. Open access. Open society. Open knowledge. Open government. Even open food. The word "open" has been applied to a wide variety of words to create new terms, some of which make sense, and some not so much. This essay disambiguates the many meanings of the word "open" as it is used in a wide range of contexts.

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"Research Library Associations Endorse Open Data Accord"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Research Libraries on May 2nd, 2016

ARL has released "Research Library Associations Endorse Open Data Accord."

Here's an excerpt:

IARLA [International Alliance of Research Library Associations] views the Science International accord on "Open Data in a Big Data World" as an important step towards creating and enabling this common vision of the importance of open data. In setting out principles for open data that are derived from emerging practices within the scientific community, the accord lends the voice of a key stakeholder to the case for open data and provides a practical road map for the implementation of open data at the global level.

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"Are Scientific Data Repositories Coping with Research Data Publishing?"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Open Science on May 2nd, 2016

Massimiliano Assante et al. have published "Are Scientific Data Repositories Coping with Research Data Publishing?" in Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This study analyses the solutions offered by generalist scientific data repositories, i.e., repositories supporting the deposition of any type of research data. These repositories cannot make any assumption on the application domain. They are actually called to face with the almost open ended typologies of data used in science. The current practices promoted by such repositories are analysed with respect to eight key aspects of data publishing, i.e., dataset formatting, documentation, licensing, publication costs, validation, availability, discovery and access, and citation. From this analysis it emerges that these repositories implement well consolidated practices and pragmatic solutions for literature repositories. These practices and solutions can not totally meet the needs of management and use of datasets resources, especially in a context where rapid technological changes continuously open new exploitation prospects.

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"The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician"

Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 21st, 2016

Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician " in Open and Shut?.

Here's an excerpt:

The idea of arXiv overlay journals was in the air for a long time. I think one impulse behind Discrete Analysis was the very hostile reaction from many people to the setting up of the open access journal Forum of Mathematics by Cambridge University Press, which (after a three-year free period) charges £750 per article.

It seems that a large proportion of mathematicians are implacably opposed to article processing charges, no matter what assurances are given that authors themselves will never be expected to pay out of their own pocket, and that ability to pay will not affect the choice of which articles to publish.

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"Congress Wants to Turn Obama’s Open Data Actions into Law"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on April 18th, 2016

Representative Derek Kilmer has released "Congress Wants to Turn Obama's Open Data Actions into Law."

Here's an excerpt:

A new bill introduced Thursday would give a legislative basis to a number of open data initiatives already underway in the federal government under executive order.

The Open, Public, Electronic and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act, introduced by Reps. Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., and Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, would build upon a number open data policies from the Obama administration that push federal agencies to make as much data as possible free for the public to use.

A Senate version of the bill will also soon be introduced by Sens. Brian Schatz, D-HI, and Ben Sasse, R-Neb.

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"The Academic, Economic and Societal Impacts of Open Access: An Evidence-Based Review"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 14th, 2016

Jonathan P. Tennant et al. have published an e-print for review of "The Academic, Economic and Societal Impacts of Open Access: An Evidence-Based Review" in F1000 Research.

Here's an excerpt:

This review presents published evidence of the impact of Open Access on the academy, economy and society. Overall, the evidence points to a favorable impact of OA on the scholarly literature through increased dissemination and reuse. OA has the potential to be a sustainable business venture for new and established publishers, and can provide substantial benefits to research- and development-intensive businesses, including health organisations, volunteer sectors, and technology. OA is a global issue, highlighted by inequalities beset at all levels between developing and developed nations, and largely fueled by financial inequality. Current levels of access in the developing world are insufficient and unstable, and only OA has the potential to foster the development of stable research ecosystems. While predatory publishing remains an ongoing issue, particularly in the developing world, increasing public engagement, development of OA policies, and discussion of sustainable and ethical publishing practices can remove this potential threat to OA.

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Springer Will Automatically Deposit MIT-Authored Papers in DSpace@MIT

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 12th, 2016

Springer and MIT have reached an agreement that will result in Springer automatically depositing MIT-authored papers in DSpace@MIT nine months after publication.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, one of the first initiatives of its kind in the United States, made a bold commitment to disseminate the results of MIT research and scholarship as widely and openly as possible. Recently, the MIT Libraries affirmed this commitment by signing an innovative agreement with Springer, one of the world's largest scholarly publishers. Springer will send manuscripts of MIT-authored scholarly papers directly to the Open Access Articles Collection of DSpace@MIT, the Institute's open access repository.

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"Transparency: The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science and Open Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on April 1st, 2016

Liz Lyon has published "Transparency: The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science and Open Data" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper presents an exploration of the concept of research transparency. The policy context is described and situated within the broader arena of open science. This is followed by commentary on transparency within the research process, which includes a brief overview of the related concept of reproducibility and the associated elements of research integrity, fraud and retractions. A two-dimensional model or continuum of open science is considered and the paper builds on this foundation by presenting a three-dimensional model, which includes the additional axis of 'transparency'. The concept is further unpacked and preliminary definitions of key terms are introduced: transparency, transparency action, transparency agent and transparency tool.

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"Open Access, Open Science, Open Society"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 25th, 2016

Thomas Margoni et al. have self-archived "Open Access, Open Science, Open Society."

Here's an excerpt:

The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that Open Access is a key enabler of Open Science, which in turn will lead to a more Open Society. Furthermore, the paper argues that while legislative interventions play an important role in the top-down regulation of Open Access, legislators currently lack an informed and systematic vision on the role of Open Access in science and society. In this historical phase, other complementary forms of intervention (bottom-up) appear much more "informed" and effective. This paper, which intends to set the stage for future research, identifies a few pieces of the puzzle: the relationship between formal and informal norms in the field of Open Science and how these impact on intellectual property rights, the protection of personal data, the assessment of science and the technology employed for the communication of science.

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