Archive for the 'Open Science' Category

"E-Science as a Catalyst for Transformational Change in University Research Libraries"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Cyberinfrastructure/E-Science, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Open Science on February 19th, 2014

Mary E. Piorun has self-archived her dissertaion "E-Science as a Catalyst for Transformational Change in University Research Libraries."

Here's an excerpt:

Changes in how research is conducted, from the growth of e-science to the emergence of big data, have lead to new opportunities for librarians to become involved in the creation and management of research data, at the same time the duties and responsibilities of university libraries continue to evolve. This study examines those roles related to e-science while exploring the concept of transformational change and leadership issues in bringing about such a change. Using the framework established by Levy and Merry for first- and second-order change, four case studies of libraries whose institutions are members in the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) are developed.

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    "SCOAP3 Lifts Off: An Interview with Ann Okerson"

    Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 18th, 2014

    David Wojick has published "SCOAP3 Lifts Off: An Interview with Ann Okerson" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

    Here's an excerpt:

    Q: SCOAP3 seems pretty complicated to me. As I understand it they make deals with leading particle physics journals, so that when those libraries that participate in SCOAP3 pay the article publishing charges, everyone's subscription price is either lowered or eliminated, depending on whether some or all of the articles are paid for. Is that correct?

    A: Roughly put, that's true. "They" are "we" in this case. Let me note here that without the interest and participation of the publishers, SCOAP3 would not have launched on January 1st, already with hundreds of 2014 articles in the SCOAP3 repository at CERN and now flowing in on a daily basis. The SCOAP3 Technical Working Group developed, in conjunction with the Steering Committee, a set of criteria that formed the basis for publisher participation. Publishers received the Invitation to Tender and responded by describing in detail the way in which they would participate and at what cost per article.

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      Open Science Win: Johnson & Johnson Clinical Trial Data Sharing Agreement

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on February 3rd, 2014

      Johnson & Johnson has announced a clinical trial data sharing agreement with the Yale School of Medicine.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      Johnson & Johnson today announced that its subsidiary, Janssen Research and Development, LLC, has entered into a novel agreement with Yale School of Medicine's Open Data Access (YODA) Project that will extend its commitment to sharing clinical trials data to enhance public health and advance science and medicine. Under the agreement, YODA will serve as an independent body to review requests from investigators and physicians seeking access to anonymized clinical trials data from Janssen, the pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson, and make final decisions on data sharing. This is the first time any company has collaborated with a completely independent third party to review and make decisions regarding every request for clinical data.

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        "It’s the Neoliberalism, Stupid: Why Instrumentalist Arguments for Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science Are Not Enough"

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science on January 30th, 2014

        The Impact of Social Science has republished Eric Kansa's "It's the Neoliberalism, Stupid: Why Instrumentalist Arguments for Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science Are Not Enough."

        Here's an excerpt:

        Neoliberal universities primarily serve the needs of commerce. They need to churn out technically skilled human resources (made desperate for any work by high loads of debt) and easily monetized technical advancements. . . .

        How can something so wonderful and right as "openness" further promote Neoliberalism? After all, aren't we the rebels blasting at the exhaust vents of Elsevier's Death Star? But in selling openness to the heads of foundations, businesses, governments and universities, we often end up adopting the tropes of Neoliberalism. As a tactic, that's perfectly reasonable. As a long-term strategy, I think it's doomed.

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          Congress Madates Open Access for Labor, Health, and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies

          Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on January 17th, 2014

          The passage of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 mandates open access for federal agencies under the Labor, Health, and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies Senate subcommittee with research budgets of $100 million or more.

          Here's an excerpt from the bill:

          SEC. 527. Each Federal agency, or in the case of an agency with multiple bureaus, each bureau (or operating division) funded under this Act that has research and development expenditures in excess of $100,000,000 per year shall develop a Federal research public access policy that provides for—

          • the submission to the agency, agency bureau, or designated entity acting on behalf of the agency, a machine-readable version of the author's final peer-reviewed manuscripts that have been accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journals describing research supported, in whole or in part, from funding by the Federal Government;
          • free online public access to such final peer-reviewed manuscripts or published versions not later than 12 months after the official date of publication; and
          • compliance with all relevant copyright laws.

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            "The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on December 3rd, 2013

            Bart Ragon has published "The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data" in the latest issue of the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

            Here's an excerpt:

            Librarian involvement in the Open Access (OA) movement has traditionally focused on access to scholarly publications. Recent actions by the White House have focused attention on access on the data produced from federally sponsored research. Questions have emerged concerning access to the output of federally sponsored research and whether it is a public or private good. Understanding the political battle over access to federally funded research is closely tied to the ownership of the peer review process in higher education and associated revenue streams, and as a result, interest groups seeking to influence government regulation have politicized the issues. As a major funder of research in higher education, policies from the federal government are likely to drive change in research practices at higher education institutions and impact library services. The political economy of federally sponsored research data will shape research enterprises in higher education and inspire a number of new services distributed throughout the research life cycle.

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              Opening Science: The Evolving Guide on How the Internet Is Changing Research, Collaboration and Scholarly Publishing

              Posted in Open Access, Open Science on November 13th, 2013

              An open access, editable version of Opening Science: The Evolving Guide on How the Internet Is Changing Research, Collaboration and Scholarly Publishing is available.

              Here's an excerpt:

              This book will give researchers, scientists, decision makers, politicians, and stakeholders an overview on the basics, the tools, and the vision behind the current changes we see in the field of knowledge creation. It is meant as a starting point for readers to become an active part in the future of research and to become an informed party during the transition phase. This is pivotal, since research, as a sensitive, complex process with many facets and millions of participants, hierarchies, personal networks, and structures, needs informed participants.

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                figshare for Institutions Launched

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Repositories, Open Science on September 5th, 2013

                figshare has launched an instiutional service for research data.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                figshare today announces the launch of 'figshare for Institutions'—a simple and cost-effective software solution for academic and higher education establishments to both securely host and make publicly available its academic research outputs. figshare, allows academic institutions to publish, share and get credit for their research data, hosting videos, datasets, posters, figures and theses in a cost-effective way.

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