Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Leading by Example? ALA Division Publications, Open Access, and Sustainability"

Posted in ALA, Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 7th, 2016

Nathan Hall et al. have published "Leading by Example? ALA Division Publications, Open Access, and Sustainability" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This investigation explores scholarly communication business models in American Library Association (ALA) division peer-reviewed academic journals. . . . Through an analysis of documented procedures, policies, and finances of five ALA division journals, we compare business and access models. We conclude that some ALA divisions prioritize the costs associated with changing business models, including hard-to-estimate costs such as the labor of volunteers. For other divisions, the financial aspects are less important than maintaining core values, such as those defined in ALA's Core Values in Librarianship.

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"OJS 3 is Here!"

Posted in Open Access, Open Source Software, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 2nd, 2016

The Public Knowledge Project has released "OJS 3 is Here!." OJS stands for Open Journal Systems.

Here's an excerpt:

This is the most comprehensive software upgrade since we moved from OJS 1.0 to 2.0 way back in 2005. It incorporates a decade of feedback from our users on the community forum, through usability testing, and through thousands of conversations, feature requests, and helpful critiques.

As we approach the milestone of having 10,000 journals actively using OJS as their publishing platform, we believe this new release will significantly enhance their productivity and ease of use, and provide a modern foundation for innovation in online publishing.

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Book Reading 2016

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on September 2nd, 2016

The Pew Research Center has released Book Reading 2016.

Here's an excerpt:

Between 2011 and 2016, the number of Americans who read books on tablet computers has increased nearly fourfold (from 4% to 15%), while the share who read books on smartphones has more than doubled (from 5% to 13%). The share of Americans who read books on desktop or laptop computers has also increased, although by a more modest amount: 11% of Americans now do this, up from 7% in 2011.

By contrast, 8% of Americans now report that they read books using dedicated e-reader devices—nearly identical to the 7% who reported doing so in 2011.

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"FTC Charges Academic Journal Publisher OMICS Group Deceived Researchers"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on September 1st, 2016

The Federal Trade Commission has released "FTC Charges Academic Journal Publisher OMICS Group Deceived Researchers."

Here's an excerpt:

The Federal Trade Commission has charged the publisher of hundreds of purported online academic journals with deceiving academics and researchers about the nature of its publications and hiding publication fees ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

The FTC's complaint alleges that OMICS Group, Inc., along with two affiliated companies and their president and director, Srinubabu Gedela, claim that their journals follow rigorous peer-review practices and have editorial boards made up of prominent academics. In reality, many articles are published with little to no peer review and numerous individuals represented to be editors have not agreed to be affiliated with the journals.

According to the FTC's complaint, OMICS does not tell researchers that they must pay significant publishing fees until after it has accepted an article for publication, and often will not allow researchers to withdraw their articles from submission, thereby making the research ineligible for publication in another journal. Academic ethics standards generally forbid researchers from submitting the same research to more than one journal.

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"Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on August 30th, 2016

Andrew Albanese has published "Publishers Appeal GSU Copyright Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

Following their second district court loss in eight years of litigation, the publisher plaintiffs in Cambridge University Press vs. Patton (known commonly as the GSU e-reserves case) have again appealed the case.

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The Countries of OAWorld 2011-2015: Supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on August 29th, 2016

Walt Crawford has published The Countries of OAWorld 2011-2015: Supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This supplement to Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015 looks at each country with journals fully analyzed in the report. Countries with ten or more journals (some 70 of them) get full writeups; others are summarized by region.

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"Substituting Article Processing Charges for Subscriptions: The Cure Is Worse than the Disease"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 25th, 2016

ARL has released "Substituting Article Processing Charges for Subscriptions: The Cure Is Worse than the Disease by David Shulenburger."

Here's an excerpt:

The likely result of flipping the market to APCs is that the collective cost of scholarly communications would rise above the level that would prevail under the subscription-financed regime.

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"Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier’s SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown"

Posted in Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing on July 21st, 2016

Mike Masnick has published "Just as Open Competitor to Elsevier's SSRN Launches, SSRN Accused of Copyright Crackdown" in Techdirt.

Here's an excerpt:

And perhaps this [SocArXiv announcement]came just in time, because just as that happened, Stephen Henderson, a law professor, noted that SSRN took down his paper saying that they didn't think he retained the copyright to it.

See also: "SocArXiv Debuts, as SSRN acquisition Comes Under Scrutiny."

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"Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016

Melanie Schlosser has published "Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION Libraries have a mission to educate users about copyright, and library publishing staff are often involved in that work. This article investigates a concrete point of intersection between the two areas—copyright statements on library-published journals. METHODS Journals published by members of the Library Publishing Coalition were examined for open access status, type and placement of copyright information, copyright ownership, and open licensing. RESULTS Journals in the sample were overwhelmingly (93%) open access. 80% presented copyright information of some kind, but only 30% of those included it at both the journal and the article level. Open licensing was present in 38% of the journals, and the most common ownership scenario was the author retaining copyright while granting a nonexclusive license to the journal or publisher. 9% of the sample journals included two or more conflicting rights statements. DISCUSSION 76% of the journals did not consistently provide accurate, easily-accessible rights information, and numerous problems were found with the use of open licensing, including conflicting licenses, incomplete licenses, and licenses not appearing at the article level. CONCLUSION Recommendations include presenting full copyright and licensing information at both the journal and the article level, careful use of open licenses, and publicly-available author agreements. External Data or Supplements:

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"The Journal Article as a Means to Share Data: A Content Analysis of Supplementary Materials from Two Disciplines"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 20th, 2016

Jeremy Kenyon, Nancy Sprague, and Edward Flathers have published "The Journal Article as a Means to Share Data: a Content Analysis of Supplementary Materials from Two Disciplines" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION The practice of publishing supplementary materials with journal articles is becoming increasingly prevalent across the sciences. We sought to understand better the content of these materials by investigating the differences between the supplementary materials published by authors in the geosciences and plant sciences. METHODS We conducted a random stratified sampling of four articles from each of 30 journals published in 2013. In total, we examined 297 supplementary data files for a range of different factors. RESULTS We identified many similarities between the practices of authors in the two fields, including the formats used (Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, PDFs) and the small size of the files. There were differences identified in the content of the supplementary materials: the geology materials contained more maps and machine-readable data; the plant science materials included much more tabular data and multimedia content. DISCUSSION Our results suggest that the data shared through supplementary files in these fields may not lend itself to reuse. Code and related scripts are not often shared, nor is much 'raw' data. Instead, the files often contain summary data, modified for human reading and use. CONCLUSION Given these and other differences, our results suggest implications for publishers, librarians, and authors, and may require shifts in behavior if effective data sharing is to be realized.

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"Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access"

Posted in Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 15th, 2016

Sarah Reis has self-archived "Deconstructing the Durham Statement: The Persistence of Print Prestige During the Age of Open Access."

Here's an excerpt:

In the seven years following the promulgation of the Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, law journals have largely responded to the call to make articles available in open, electronic formats, but not to the call to stop print publication and publish only in electronic format. Nearly all of the flagship law reviews at ABA-accredited institutions still insist on publishing in print, despite the massive decline in print subscribers and economic and environmental waste. . . . The Durham Statement was drafted by law library directors from top law schools across the country. Law librarians today must assist in facilitating the transition if we ever expect to see a world of electronic-only publication of law journals. This paper argues that the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review must be the first law reviews to transition to electronic-only publication, after which other law journals will follow suit.

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"U.S. Publishing Industry’s Annual Survey Reveals Nearly $28 Billion in Revenue in 2015"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing on July 12th, 2016

The Association of American Publishers has released "U.S. Publishing Industry's Annual Survey Reveals Nearly $28 Billion in Revenue in 2015."

Here's an excerpt:

Revenues and unit volume were essentially flat with a decrease of 0.6% from $27.96 billion in revenue from 2014, and a 0.5% increase in units from 2.70 billion units in 2014 (chart below). . . .

eBooks: After peaking in 2013 at $3.24 billion, eBook revenue declined to $3.20 billion in 2014 and again in 2015 by 11.3% to $2.84 billion. Unit sales also declined by 9.7%, with eBooks now making up 17.3% of the trade book market. . . .

Publishers saw increased revenue from trade book sales at physical retail stores for the second year in a row. In 2015, physical store sales grew 1.8% from $4.08 billion to $4.15 billion.

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