Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling"

Posted in Copyright, E-Reserves, Publishing on November 14th, 2014

Kevin L. Smith has published "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling" in Library Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The word "incentive" appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    Case Study of a Book Published under a Creative Commons License

    Posted in Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on November 12th, 2014

    Here's a brief case study of how one book under a Creative Commons license evolved and was accessed.

    In 2005, the Association of Research Libraries published my book, the Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. With ARL's agreement, I made an open access PDF available on Digital Scholarship.

    In 2006, I converted the book into an open access XHTML website and published the Open Access Bibliography Author Index and the Open Access Bibliography Title Index.

    In 2008, I worked with Open Access Directory staff to convert it to wiki format and publish it as the basis for the Bibliography of Open Access.

    In 2010, I published Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography as an open access PDF file, an open access XHTML website, and a low-cost paperback. All versions of the bibliography were under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License. This derivative work was an updated version of the Open Access Bibliography that was more narrowly focused on scholarly treatments of open access.

    Below are the Digital Scholarship use statistics for the two books as of October 31, 2014. In this analysis, only HTML files or PDF files are counted as "page views"; image files and other supporting website files are excluded. This analysis also excludes spider use.

    • Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals: over 355,000 page views.
    • Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography: over 152,000 page views.

    That's a total of over 507,000 page views. For the measured time period, about 7.9% of all file requests to Digital Scholarship failed. Consequently, I'll eliminate 7.9% of the above page views and estimate that there were over 466,000 successful page views. This tally does not include any access statistics from ARL or the OAD (nor does it include paperback sales).

    If the multi-file HTML versions of the books are eliminated from consideration, the two books still had a total of over 173,000 PDF requests (excluding spider requests), adjusted to an estimated 159,000 plus successful PDF requests.

    To put these use statistics in perspective, in 2005, Willis Regier (Director of the University of Illinois Press) estimated that the typical university press book sold between 400 to 800 copies.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014"

      Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing on November 12th, 2014

      ARL has released "Summary of SHARE Community Meeting, Fall 2014."

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      On October 13-14, 2014, members of the SHARE community gathered in Crystal City, Virginia, for their first face-to-face meeting. Attendees included more than half the members of the SHARE working groups (communications, technical, repository, and workflow), as well as SHARE Notification Service prototype participants and other stakeholders. The two-day meeting was intended to showcase progress on the Notification Service; identify challenges and opportunities related to the Notification Service prototype; explore future SHARE projects; and delve into ways in which the higher education community can play a proactive role in the stewardship of research. The meeting was convened with the generous support of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites"

        Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on November 10th, 2014

        Andy Tattersall has published "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

        Here's an excerpt:

        The debate on whether which is the best way forward for post-publication review will continue and like other topics such as measurement of research, there appears to be no 'silver bullet'. Instead there is a collection of sites and tools operating in silos, all offering to solve a problem, that being the lack of post publication discussion and assessment. Below are a list of some of the main tools and sites offering some kind of comment, discussion or review system—it is not exhaustive or comprehensive, but it will give you some idea as to what they are and do.

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          "The Effect of Discovery Systems on Online Journal Usage: A Longitudinal Study"

          Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on November 6th, 2014

          Michael Levine-Clark et al. have published The Effect of Discovery Systems on Online Journal Usage: A Longitudinal Study in Insights: The UKSG Journal.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Many academic libraries are implementing discovery services as a way of giving their users a single comprehensive search option for all library resources. These tools are designed to change the research experience, yet very few studies have investigated the impact of discovery service implementation. This study examines one aspect of that impact by asking whether usage of publisher-hosted journal content changes after implementation of a discovery tool. Libraries that have begun using the four major discovery services have seen an increase in usage of this content, suggesting that for this particular type of material, discovery services have a positive impact on use. Though all discovery services significantly increased usage relative to a no discovery service control group, some had a greater impact than others, and there was extensive variation in usage change among libraries using the same service. Future phases of this study will look at other types of content.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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            "Intersections: Journals and ‘Journals': Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on November 5th, 2014

            Walt Crawford has published "Intersections: Journals and 'Journals': Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

            Here's an excerpt:

            If you've been reading various commentaries about Gold OA journals-including Part 1-you may be wondering where all those supposed no-fee Gold OA journals are. This piece helps to tell that story. Specifically, of 2,843 journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that have an English interface version, aren't from either OASPA members or Beall-list publishers, and are not about aspects of medicine or biology-and that actually published one or more articles between January 2011 and June 30, 2014-more than 78% do not charge fees of any sort, and those journals published 53% of the articles published by the whole group during that period. Those percentages grow to almost 92% and more than 81%, respectively, for 1,426 journals in the humanities and social sciences.

            This article looks at the "DOAJ set" in depth, including new tables that show distribution of articles (and journals publishing articles during a year) on a year-by-year basis, including the percentage of free journals and articles from those journals for each year.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              "The ‘Total Cost of Publication’ in a Hybrid Open-Access Environment: Institutional Approaches to Funding Journal Article-Processing Charges in Combination with Subscriptions"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on October 27th, 2014

              S. Pinfield et al. have self-archived "The 'Total Cost of Publication' in a Hybrid Open-Access Environment: Institutional Approaches to Funding Journal Article-Processing Charges in Combination with Subscriptions."

              Here's an excerpt:

              This study analyses data from 23 UK institutions covering the period 2007 to 2014 modelling the total cost of publication (TCP). It shows a clear rise in centrally-managed APC payments from 2012 onwards, with payments projected to increase further. As well as evidencing the growing availability and acceptance of OA publishing, these trends reflect particular UK policy developments and funding arrangements intended to accelerate the move towards OA publishing ('Gold' OA). Whilst the mean value of APCs has been relatively stable, there was considerable variation in APC prices paid by institutions since 2007. In particular, 'hybrid' subscription/OA journals were consistently more expensive than fully-OA journals. Most APCs were paid to large 'traditional' commercial publishers who also received considerable subscription income. New administrative costs reported by institutions varied considerably. The total cost of publication modelling shows that APCs are now a significant part of the TCP for academic institutions, in 2013 already constituting an average of 10% of the TCP (excluding administrative costs).

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                All Harvard Schools Now Have Open Access Policies

                Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Self-Archiving on October 24th, 2014

                With the adoption of an open access policy in June by the Harvard Medical School, all Harvard schools now have open access policies.

                Here’s an excerpt from the announcement:

                Harvard Medical School adopted an open-access policy on June 18, 2014, by a unanimous vote of the Faculty Council. The new policy covers both "quad"-based and clinical faculty. Now all Harvard schools have open-access policies.

                Like the other Harvard policies, the Medical School policy insures that faculty members automatically retain a license to share their research papers freely through DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), the University’s open-access repository. Faculty also have the option to waive this license for any article, preserving their freedom to submit new work to the journals of their choice. When faculty write articles covered by the Medical School policy and the policy at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), they need only deposit once to comply with both.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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