Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on June 10th, 2016

College & Research Libraries has released an e-print of "Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much" by John Wenzler.

Here's an excerpt:

Why has the rise of the Internet—which drastically reduces the cost of distributing information—coincided with drastic increases in the prices that academic libraries pay for access to scholarly journals?This study argues that libraries are trapped in a collective action dilemma as defined by economist Mancur Olson in The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. To truly reduce their costs, librarians would have to build a shared online collection of scholarly resources jointly managed by the academic community as a whole, but individual academic institutions lack the private incentives necessary to invest in a shared collection. Thus, the management of online scholarly journals has been largely outsourced to publishers who have developed monopoly powers that allow them to increase subscription prices faster than the rate of inflation. Many librarians consider the Open Access Movement the best response to increased subscription costs, but the current strategies employed to achieve Open Access also are undermined by collective action dilemmas. In conclusion, some alternative strategies are proposed.

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    Karger Publishers Agreement Allows Researchers at 9 UKB Members to Publish Up to 250 OA Articles per Year without APCs

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 9th, 2016

    Karger Publishers has reached an agreement with nine menders of the Dutch UKB consortium that allows affiliated authors to publish up to 250 open access articles per year without APCs.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The consortial agreement grants the participating UKB libraries and their clients full perpetual access to all Karger journal content of 2016 and 2017 as before. The novel part is that affiliated authors may publish up to 250 OA articles per year with Karger without having to pay the usual OA Article Processing Charges (APCs). Authors are free to submit to any of the 100 plus peer-reviewed hybrid and full OA Karger journals; however, they are asked to mention their affiliation with a participating institution during submission.

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      Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?

      Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 9th, 2016

      Stephen Curry has self-archived "Open Access: The Beast That No-One Could—or Should—Control?"

      Here's an excerpt:

      To set the scene, I will begin with a brief description of the open access movement and recent policy initiatives before discussing their impact on the attitudes of scientists towards the broader open science agenda and public engagement. I will then consider the effects of open access (and allied moves) on the authority and independence of science—concepts that are perturbed by the increasingly blurred boundary between the academy and the public. Lastly, I will focus attention on the various publics that are actively seeking to engage with science and scientists, mainly through advocacy groups or the growing ranks of citizen scientists; here, while the impact of open access appears relatively modest, it has the capacity to spring surprises that point to future growth.

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        Gold Open Access Journals 2011-2015

        Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 8th, 2016

        It is available as a free PDF or a low-cost paperback.

        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

        This book reports on a comprehensive analysis of serious open access journals as of December 31, 2015: nearly 11,000 journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals. For 10,324 of the journals, the study includes whether or not there's an article processing charge (APC), how much it is, and the number of articles in each year 2011 through 2015. The state of serious gold OA is described in terms of article volume, fees and revenue, subject segments, regions, type of publisher and other aspects. The book includes two chapters on the May 2016 "delisting" of 2,900-odd journals.

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          "Demographics of Scholarly Publishing and Communication Professionals"

          Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 7th, 2016

          Albert N. Greco, Robert M. Wharton, and Amy Brand have published the "Demographics of Scholarly Publishing and Communication Professionals" in Learned Publishing.

          Here's an excerpt:

          While a great deal is known about the companies active in this sector, we need to know more about the employees of the firms that edit, produce, market, and distribute today's scholarly books and journals. To achieve this goal, the researchers conducted an international survey in late 2014 and early 2015 of approximately 6,121 scholarly publishing employees in 33 nations.

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            "Amplifying the Impact of Open Access: Wikipedia and the Diffusion of Science"

            Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 7th, 2016

            Misha Teplitskiy, Grace Lu, and Eamon Duede have self-archived "Amplifying the Impact of Open Access: Wikipedia and the Diffusion of Science."

            Here's an excerpt:

            With the rise of Wikipedia as a first-stop source for scientific knowledge, it is important to compare its representation of that knowledge to that of the academic literature. Here we identify the 250 most heavily used journals in each of 26 research fields (4,721 journals, 19.4M articles in total) indexed by the Scopus database, and test whether topic, academic status, and accessibility make articles from these journals more or less likely to be referenced on Wikipedia. We find that a journal's academic status (impact factor) and accessibility (open access policy) both strongly increase the probability of it being referenced on Wikipedia. Controlling for field and impact factor, the odds that an open access journal is referenced on the English Wikipedia are 47% higher compared to paywall journals. One of the implications of this study is that a major consequence of open access policies is to significantly amplify the diffusion of science, through an intermediary like Wikipedia, to a broad audience.

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              "Breaking Down Pros and Cons of Preprints in Biomedicine"

              Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on May 4th, 2016

              Hilda Bastian has published "Breaking Down Pros and Cons of Preprints in Biomedicine" in Absolutely Maybe.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The pros and cons on this are arguably different for physics and biomedicine. It might be easier to copy or fold in someone else's insights into an experiment or paper and beat them to press, so the argument goes. Perhaps this is in part a concern about losing out on a citation in a higher impact journal if your work is no longer seen as exciting. If it's a common concern, then it's a serious hurdle for preprint acceptance.

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                "The Mystery of Creative Commons Licenses"

                Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 29th, 2016

                De Gruyter Open has released "The Mystery of Creative Commons Licenses" by Witold Kieńć.

                Here's an excerpt:

                While more than half of open access papers are published under the terms of a liberal Creative Commons Attribution Licence, the majority of authors of open access works seem not to accept the terms of either this or any other Creative Commons license.

                Despite the fact that the majority of journals indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals use liberal Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence as a default, and that probably more than half of all articles published in open access serials are published under the terms of this licence, academic authors seem not to support liberal licensing. How is it possible? Are authors of more than 600 thousand CC-BY licensed works invisible in surveys? Or do they publish under the terms of this license against their will?

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                  "Policy: Google Books: The Final Chapter?"

                  Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Google and Other Search Engines, Publishing on April 29th, 2016

                  Walt Crawford has published "Policy: Google Books: The Final Chapter?" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  On Monday, April 18, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the Authors Guild appeal of a district court decision finding, once again, that Google Books Search is fair use. . . .

                  That should be the final chapter in this decade-long epic case, and maybe I should stop right here.

                  But let's look at a couple of the early commentaries after the denial (two of many), then go back for the usual chronological citations and notes on items since the last coverage of this legal marathon. The question mark in the essay's title? Well, the Authors Litigation Guild (the middle word isn't part of the name, but maybe it should be) seems as incapable of admitting defeat as it apparently is of recognizing that it only represents the interests of a few hundred or few thousand writers. And, of course, there's the enticing if unlikely counter possibility: what if Google asked to recover its legal costs, which must surely be in the millions of dollars?

                  See also: “Google Case Ends, but Copyright Fight Goes On.”

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                    "Ebook Sales Declined in 2015; Digital Audio Continued Growth"

                    Posted in Publishing on April 27th, 2016

                    AAP has released "Ebook Sales Declined in 2015; Digital Audio Continued Growth."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Overall sales were up 0.8 percent to $7.2 billion compared to $7.1 billion in 2014.

                    Overall publisher revenue for 2015, however, was $15.4 billion, down 2.6 percent from the previous year. . . .

                    Ebook sales declined in 2015; digital audio continued to grow in popularity; trade publishers did better than educational and scholarly publishers; adult books performed better than other trade categories.

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                      "Fracking the Ecosystem: Periodicals Price Survey 2016"

                      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on April 22nd, 2016

                      Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson have published "Fracking the Ecosystem: Periodicals Price Survey 2016" in Library Journal.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      Accordingly, we have measured the 2015 price increases of more than 5,000 e-journal packages handled by EBSCO. Our analysis indicates an average e-journal package price increase of 5.8% to 6.3%, down slightly from last year's average of 6.6%.

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                        "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician"

                        Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on April 21st, 2016

                        Richard Poynder has published "The Open Access Interviews: Sir Timothy Gowers, Mathematician " in Open and Shut?.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        The idea of arXiv overlay journals was in the air for a long time. I think one impulse behind Discrete Analysis was the very hostile reaction from many people to the setting up of the open access journal Forum of Mathematics by Cambridge University Press, which (after a three-year free period) charges £750 per article.

                        It seems that a large proportion of mathematicians are implacably opposed to article processing charges, no matter what assurances are given that authors themselves will never be expected to pay out of their own pocket, and that ability to pay will not affect the choice of which articles to publish.

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