Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

"Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Electronic Resources, Libraries, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Communication on July 8th, 2013

portal: Libraries and the Academy has released an e-print of "Unintended Consequences: New Materialist Perspectives on Library Technologies and the Digital Record" by Marlene Manoff.

Here's an excerpt:

Digital technology has irrevocably altered the nature of the archive. Drawing on materialist critiques and the evolving field of media archaeology, this essay explores new strategies for understanding the implications of computer networks in libraries. Although a significant portion of the contemporary literature within Library and Information Science (LIS) addresses issues of technological change, the materialist and multidisciplinary approaches proposed here provide a theoretical basis for investigating the current state of library technologies in new ways. These methods provide insight into the proliferation of digital products and the cycles of platform adoption and replacement that have marked the past decades of library development. They also help to reframe questions about content aggregation and the licensing of digital scholarship.

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    "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals"

    Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

    Donald W. King and Carol Tenopir have published "Linking Information Seeking Patterns with Purpose, Use, Value, and Return on Investment of Academic Library Journals" in the latest issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice.

    Here's an excerpt:

    The emphasis of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship of how purposes of reading scholarly journals (e.g., research, teaching, current awareness, etc.) lead to the information seeking patterns used by them (e.g., how they identify articles that are read, where they obtain them, etc.), which dictates certain aspects of use (e.g., how much is read, age of articles read, format of the articles, etc.), which is related to the positive outcomes or value of reading (e.g., increased productivity, improved research or teaching, saving readers' time or money, etc.), which serves as return components of the ROI of academic library journal collections.

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      "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX"

      Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 24th, 2013

      Sven Vlaeminck has published "Data Management in Scholarly Journals and Possible Roles for Libraries—Some Insights from EDaWaX" in the latest issue of LIBER Quarterly.

      Here's an excerpt:

      In this paper we summarize the findings of an empirical study conducted by the EDaWaX-Project. 141 economics journals were examined regarding the quality and extent of data availability policies that should support replications of published empirical results in economics. This paper suggests criteria for such policies that aim to facilitate replications. These criteria were also used for analysing the data availability policies we found in our sample and to identify best practices for data policies of scholarly journals in economics. In addition, we also evaluated the journals' data archives and checked the percentage of articles associated with research data. To conclude, an appraisal as to how scientific libraries might support the linkage of publications to underlying research data in cooperation with researchers, editors, publishers and data centres is presented.

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        "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships"

        Posted in Disciplinary Archives, Open Access, Publishing, Self-Archiving on June 18th, 2013

        Vincent Lariviere, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Benoit Macaluso, Stasa Milojevic, Blaise Cronin, and Mike Thelwall have self-archived "arXiv E-prints and the Journal of Record: An Analysis of Roles and Relationships" in arXiv.org.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers – both published and unpublished – have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers.

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          "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher"

          Posted in Bibliographies, Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 17th, 2013

          Digital Scholarship has released "A Look Back at 24 Years as an Open Access Publisher" by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail and LISTSERVs, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal.

          That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). Although PACS-L's greatest contribution may have been in raising librarians' awareness of the importance and potential of the then fledgling Internet, it was also the platform on which my initial scholarly digital publishing efforts were based.

          In August 1989, I launched The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. Starting in 1994, ASCII articles were also distributed via a Gopher server. In 1995, a website was established, and articles were also distributed as HTML files.

          I edited the The Public-Access Computer Systems Review through 1996. By the end of that year, there had been over 4.2 million requests for the journal's files.

          In 1996, I established the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book that had 79 subsequent versions. It was initially published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats.

          These early digital publishing projects were sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries, which maintains an archive of ASCII articles from The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (http://journals.tdl.org/pacsr/index.php/pacsr). The PACS-L archive was deleted in 2013 when the list shut down.

          In 1995, I established Digital Scholarship (http://digital-scholarship.org/), and I began to publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. By 2013, Digital Scholarship was publishing PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

          The last version of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography was published in 2011 (http://digital-scholarship.org/sepb/sepb.html). From 1996 through 2011, the e-book had over 11.9 million file requests.

          From April 2005 through May 2013, Digital Scholarship had over 12.2 million visitors from 229 counties and over 58.7 million file requests.

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            "The HathiTrust Case and Appeal: A Policy Brief"

            Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Mass Digitizaton, Publishing on June 14th, 2013

            The EDUCAUSE Policy Office has released "The HathiTrust Case and Appeal: A Policy Brief."

            Here's an excerpt:

            On October 10, 2012, Judge Harold Baer of the U.S. District Court in New York ruled in favor of the HathiTrust Digital Library (HDL) and its university partners in a copyright infringement suit brought by the Authors Guild (AG) and other groups. This policy brief outlines why this decision was important for higher education, what impact the February 2013 appeal might have, and next steps.

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              G8 Science Ministers Issue Statement Supporting Open Access

              Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 14th, 2013

              The G8 science ministers have issued a statement that includes sections supporting open access.

              Here's an excerpt:

              Open enquiry is at the heart of scientific endeavour, and rapid technological change has profound implications for the way that science is both conducted and its results communicated. It can provide society with the necessary information to solve global challenges. We are committed to openness in scientific research data to speed up the progress of scientific discovery, create innovation, ensure that the results of scientific research are as widely available as practical, enable transparency in science and engage the public in the scientific process. We have decided to support the set of principles for open scientific research data outlined below as a basis for further discussions.

              i. To the greatest extent and with the fewest constraints possible publicly funded scientific research data should be open, while at the same time respecting concerns in relation to privacy, safety, security and commercial interests, whilst acknowledging the legitimate concerns of private partners.

              ii. Open scientific research data should be easily discoverable, accessible, assessable, intelligible, useable, and wherever possible interoperable to specific quality standards.

              iii. To maximise the value that can be realised from data, the mechanisms for delivering open scientific research data should be efficient and cost effective, and consistent with the potential benefits.

              iv. To ensure successful adoption by scientific communities, open scientific research data principles will need to be underpinned by an appropriate policy environment, including recognition of researchers fulfilling these principles, and appropriate digital infrastructure.

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                Directory of Open Access Journals Releases New Selection Criteria Draft

                Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 13th, 2013

                The Directory of Open Access Journals has released a draft of its new journal selection criteria .

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                We have tried to construct objective criteria that can facilitate compliance verification easily. In order to be listed in the DOAJ, a journal must meet the following criteria:

                • Journal will be asked to provide basic information (title, ISSN, etc.), contact information, and information about journal policies
                • Journal is registered with SHERPA/RoMEO
                • Journal has an editorial board with clearly identifiable members (including affiliation information)
                • Journal publishes a minimum of five articles per year (does not apply for new journals)
                • Allows use and reuse at least at the following levels (as specified in the Open Access Spectrum, http://www.plos.org/about/open-access/howopenisit/ ):
                  • Full text, metadata, and citations of articles can be crawled and accessed with permission (Machine Readability Level 4)
                  • Provides free readership rights to all articles immediately upon publication (Reader Rights Level 1)
                  • Reuse is subject to certain restrictions; no remixing (Reuse Rights Level 3)
                  • Allow authors to retain copyright in their article with no restrictions (Copyrights Level 1)
                  • Author can post the final, peer-reviewed manuscript version (postprint) to any repository or website (Author Posting Rights Level 2)

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                  Copyright © 2005-2014 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

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