Archive for the 'Publishing' Category

Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on March 13th, 2014

The Wellcome Trust has released Developing an Effective Market for Open Access Article Processing Charges.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In their report, published in March 2014, Björk and Solomon set out a series of scenarios for how funders might develop their approaches for supporting APCs. These cover both full open access journals (which operate exclusively by this model) and so-called hybrid journals (which offer this service for individual articles, while continuing to operate via the subscription model). The authors appraised three combined scenarios, which they conclude to be the most promising for further consideration.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

Be Sociable, Share!

    MOOC Content Licensing Solution Launched

    Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on March 10th, 2014

    The Copyright Clearance Center has Launched the MOOC Content Licensing Solution.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    The MOOC Content Licensing Solution uses the current per-page or per-article academic-based pricing rightsholders have established through CCC's Electronic Course Content pay-per-use service. CCC offers digital rights from over 5,000 rightsholders around the world to public, private not-for-profit, and private for-profit U.S.-based institutions of higher education that conduct academic MOOCs.

    Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

    Be Sociable, Share!

      PLOS Clarifies Open Data Policy

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2014

      PLOS has clarified its open data policy.

      Here's an excerpt:

      In the previous post, and also on our site for PLOS ONE Academic Editors, an attempt to simplify our policy did not represent the policy correctly and we sincerely apologize for that and for the confusion it has caused. We are today correcting that post and hoping it provides the clarity many have been seeking. . . .

      Two key things to summarize about the policy are:

      1. The policy does not aim to say anything new about what data types, forms and amounts should be shared.
      2. The policy does aim to make transparent where the data can be found, and says that it shouldn't be just on the authors' own hard drive.

      Correction

      We have struck out the paragraph in the original PLOS ONE blog post headed "What do we mean by data", as we think it led to much of the confusion. Instead we offer this guidance to authors planning to submit to a PLOS journal.

      What data do I need to make available?

      We ask you to make available the data underlying the findings in the paper, which would be needed by someone wishing to understand, validate or replicate the work. Our policy has not changed in this regard. What has changed is that we now ask you to say where the data can be found.

      As the PLOS data policy applies to all fields in which we publish, we recognize that we'll need to work closely with authors in some subject areas to ensure adherence to the new policy. Some fields have very well established standards and practices around data, while others are still evolving, and we would like to work with any field that is developing data standards. We are aiming to ensure transparency about data availability.

      Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

      Be Sociable, Share!

        Getty Images Announces Free Noncommercial Use

        Posted in Publishing on March 7th, 2014

        Getty Images has announced that its images can be used freely on the web for noncommercial purposes.

        Here's an excerpt from the press release:

        Global digital media company Getty Images today announces, for the first time, the ability for people to easily embed and share its imagery—at no cost—or non-commercial use on websites, blogs and social media channels through a new embed tool. . . .

        This is the latest in a series of moves by Getty Images to harness technology and social media to drive broader exposure and usage of its content. Recent initiatives include a unique partnership with Pinterest, the fastest growing content sharing channel*, announced in October 2013, whereby Pinterest pays Getty Images a fee in exchange for metadata. Getty Images then shares these fees with its contributors, who also receive attribution when their content is used.

        Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

        Be Sociable, Share!

          "Ethics and Access 1: The Sad Case of Jeffrey Beall"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 3rd, 2014

          Walt Crawford has published "Ethics and Access 1: The Sad Case of Jeffrey Beall" in Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large.

          Here's an excerpt:

          This is the first of a trio of essays: two related to fairly specific situations, one covering a range of ethical discussions. Depending on how you define "ethics," I could also include sections on Elsevier and OA, embargoes, fallacious and misleading anti- OA arguments and the whole area of peer review. Or maybe not. In any case, we lead off with the sad case of Jeffrey Beall.

          Since Beall's chief claim to fame is his ever-growing list of supposedly predatory OA journals, and since I'm showing the case for treating Beall as a questionable source, I have to say this: In case you're thinking "Walt's claiming there are no scam OA journals," I'm not—and toward the end of this essay, I'll quote some useful ways to avoid scam journals regardless of their business model.

          Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

          Be Sociable, Share!

            "Reed Elsevier 2013 Results"

            Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 28th, 2014

            Reed Elsevier has released "Reed Elsevier 2013 Results."

            Here's an excerpt:

            Commenting on the results, Anthony Habgood, Chairman, said:

            "Reed Elsevier is continuing to deliver on its long term strategic and financial priorities. With underlying revenue growth across all major business areas, operating profit and earnings grew well in 2013. We made good progress on organic development and portfolio reshaping, and our strong cash flow enabled us to step up our share buyback programme whilst maintaining balance sheet strength. We are recommending a +7% increase in the full year dividend for Reed Elsevier PLC and +8% for Reed Elsevier NV, in line with growth in adjusted earnings per share at constant exchange rates."

            Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

            Be Sociable, Share!

              PLOS Mandates Immediate Open Access to Article-Related Data

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 26th, 2014

              PLOS has mandated that author's provide immediate open access to article-related data upon publication.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              In an effort to increase access to this data, we are now revising our data-sharing policy for all PLOS journals: authors must make all data publicly available, without restriction, immediately upon publication of the article. Beginning March 3rd, 2014, all authors who submit to a PLOS journal will be asked to provide a Data Availability Statement, describing where and how others can access each dataset that underlies the findings. This Data Availability Statement will be published on the first page of each article.

              Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

              Be Sociable, Share!

                "E-Book Platforms for Academic Librarians"

                Posted in Copyright, E-Books, Licenses, Publishing, Scholarly Books on February 25th, 2014

                Audrey Powers has self-archived "E-Book Platforms for Academic Librarians."

                Here's an excerpt:

                The goal of this issue is to provide a succinct overview of e-book platforms for academic librarians as well as insights into where e-book platforms are headed in the future. Most of the authors work in academic libraries and their job responsibilities include developing, procuring, promoting, and educating users about e-books. The topics covered include an overview of e-book platforms including technical aspects and business models, lending platforms, aggregator platforms, commercial publisher platforms, and university press platforms. It is our hope that when you read these articles it will add to your knowledge base about the current and future state of e-book platforms in academic libraries.

                Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

                Be Sociable, Share!

                  The Benefits and Risks of the PDF/A-3 File Format for Archival Institutions

                  Posted in Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Publishing, Reports and White Papers on February 24th, 2014

                  The NDSA has released The Benefits and Risks of the PDF/A-3 File Format for Archival Institutions.

                  Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                  The report takes a measured look at the costs and benefits of the widespread use of the PDF/A-3 format, especially as it effects content arriving in collecting institutions. It provides background on the technical development of the specification, identifies specific scenarios under which the format might be used and suggests policy prescriptions for collecting institutions to consider.

                  For example, the report suggests that for memory institutions, the acceptance of embedded files in PDF/A documents would depend on very specific protocols between depositors and archival repositories that clarify acceptable embedded formats and define workflows that guarantee that the relationship between the PDF document and any embedded files is fully understood by the archival institution.

                  Additionally, the report notes that the complexity of the PDF format and the wide variance in PDF rendering implementations and creating applications suggests that PDF/A-3 may be appropriate for use in controlled workflows, but may not be an appropriate choice as a general-purpose bundling format.

                  Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

                  Be Sociable, Share!

                    "SCOAP3 Lifts Off: An Interview with Ann Okerson"

                    Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 18th, 2014

                    David Wojick has published "SCOAP3 Lifts Off: An Interview with Ann Okerson" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    Q: SCOAP3 seems pretty complicated to me. As I understand it they make deals with leading particle physics journals, so that when those libraries that participate in SCOAP3 pay the article publishing charges, everyone's subscription price is either lowered or eliminated, depending on whether some or all of the articles are paid for. Is that correct?

                    A: Roughly put, that's true. "They" are "we" in this case. Let me note here that without the interest and participation of the publishers, SCOAP3 would not have launched on January 1st, already with hundreds of 2014 articles in the SCOAP3 repository at CERN and now flowing in on a daily basis. The SCOAP3 Technical Working Group developed, in conjunction with the Steering Committee, a set of criteria that formed the basis for publisher participation. Publishers received the Invitation to Tender and responded by describing in detail the way in which they would participate and at what cost per article.

                    Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

                    Be Sociable, Share!

                      Only 20.56 % of Jounals in DOAJ Use CC BY or CC BY-SA License

                      Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 17th, 2014

                      The post "CC-BY Dominates under the Creative Commons licensed Journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)" analyzes the use of Creative Commons licences by journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      A total of 2,016 (or 20.56 %) of the guided journal in DOAJ therefore use a license (CC-BY or CC-BY-SA), which is compatible with the requirements of the Open Definition and allow a restriction-free use of the contents within the meaning of Open Access defined the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the RCUK Open Access policy and the Berlin Declaration.

                      If we consider the subset of journals that use any CC license that the claims of the Open Definition sufficient licenses dominate even slightly: About 54% of all journals that use a CC license , use either CC-BY ( 52.77 %) or CC-BY-SA (1.40 %). Surprisingly low is the proportion of journals which use the most restrictive CC license CC-BY-NC-ND : Only 737 journals (7.52 % of all journals and 19.80% under the CC-licensed journals). This license variant neither allows edits or allows to create derivative works (such as translations) nor a commercial use is possible. Surprisingly allow more than half (2,060, 55.35 %) of which is under a CC license Journals a commercial exploitation of the contents, only 44.65% (1662) prohibit this.

                      Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

                      Be Sociable, Share!

                        E-print Copyright Debate Continues: "Its the Content, Not the Version!"

                        Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 7th, 2014

                        Kevin Smith has published "Its the Content, Not the Version!" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        Throughout this discussion, the proponents of the position that copyright is transferred only in a final version really do not make any legal arguments as such, just an assertion of what they wish were the situation (I wish it were too). But here is a legal point—the U.S. copyright law makes the difficulty with this position pretty clearly in section 202 when it states the obvious principle that copyright is distinct from any particular material object that embodies the copyrighted work. So it is simply not true to say that version A has a copyright and version B has a different copyright.

                        See also: "Where Copyrights Come from (Part I)—Copyediting Does–Not–Create a New Copyright" by Nancy Sims.

                        Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap

                        Be Sociable, Share!

                          Page 20 of 87« First...10...1819202122...304050...Last »

                          DigitalKoans

                          DigitalKoans

                          Digital Scholarship

                          Copyright © 2005-2015 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

                          Creative Commons License
                          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.