Archive for the 'Research Libraries' Category

"ARL Awarded Sloan Grant to Help Preserve Software, Save Cultural Record, Advance Discovery"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on October 20th, 2017

ARL has released "ARL Awarded Sloan Grant to Help Preserve Software, Save Cultural Record, Advance Discovery."

Here's an excerpt:

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has been awarded a $315,000 grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to develop and disseminate a Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Software Preservation. This code will give individuals and institutions clear guidance on the legality of archiving software, in order to ensure continued access to digital files of all kinds and to offer hands-on understanding of the history of technology.

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"Evolving Roles of Preservation Professionals: Trends in Position Announcements from 2004 to 2015"

Posted in Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on October 16th, 2017

Mary M. Miller and Martha Horan have published "Evolving Roles of Preservation Professionals: Trends in Position Announcements from 2004 to 2015" in Library Resources & Technical Services.

Here's an excerpt:

As research libraries continue to expand the scope of content they acquire, manage, and make accessible, the preservation charge within organizations is broadening. Libraries and other cultural heritage institutions must balance the preservation of books, manuscripts, archives, and audiovisual materials with born-digital and digitized content. As preservation challenges and strategies evolve, professional positions in preservation must also evolve to meet the needs of academic and other cultural institutions. The ability to quantify how preservation positions are changing, and to identify the required skill sets and educational backgrounds needed for preservation professionals, is central to navigating this shift. To begin to address this, the authors collected and analyzed announcements for professional preservation positions in libraries and archives from 2004 through 2015. They compared the contents of announcements between earlier and more recent years to identify potential trends in preservation employment.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 8 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

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Simon Fraser University and Virginia Commonwealth University to Join ARL

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries on October 13th, 2017

Simon Fraser University and Virginia Commonwealth University will Join ARL at the start of 2018.

Read more about it at: "Simon Fraser University Becomes 124th Member of ARL" and "Virginia Commonwealth University Becomes 125th Member of ARL."

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Lots of Institutional Repositories Keep E-prints Safe

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Repositories, Disciplinary Archives, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017

The seductive allure of a commercial mega repository is two-fold: (1) everything is conveniently in one place, and (2) a company is taking care of the dreary and expensive business of running it.

Everything seems fine: problem solved! That is until something goes wrong, such as the repository being bought and controlled by a publisher or being threatened by lawsuits by a coterie of publishers.

Then it's important to remember: it's a company, and companies exist to make a profit.

Heh, companies are great. I wouldn't have just had that tasty cup of coffee without them. But, we should be very clear about what motivates companies and controls their behavior. And we shouldn't be shocked if they do things that aren't motivated by lofty goals.

I know: institutional repositories are hard work. The bloom is off the rose. But they exist to serve higher education, not make money, and they part of the academic communities they serve. And they can't be bought. And their universities don't often go out of business. And there are a lot of them. And they are not likely to be attractive targets for lawsuits unless something has gone very, very wrong at the local level.

Copyright is complicated. No one is advocating that we ignore it and just shove e-prints into IR's willy-nilly. Getting faculty to understand the ins and outs of e-print copyright is no picnic, nor is monitoring for compliance. But the battle is easier to fight at the local level where one-on-one faculty to librarian communication is possible.

For self-archiving to flourish in the long run, institutional repositories must flourish. By and large, librarians establish, run, and support them, and they are the quiet heroes of green open access who will continue to provide a sustainable and reliable infrastructure for self-archiving.

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"Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Digital Repositories, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Self-Archiving on October 12th, 2017

The University of Pennsylvania Libraries has released "Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress."

Here's an excerpt:

In August, bepress sold their company to Elsevier, a business with a history of aggressive confidentiality agreements, steep price increases, and opaque data mining practices. In their acquisition of bepress and other companies like SSRN and Mendeley, Elsevier demonstrates a move toward the consolidation and monopolization of products and services impacting all areas of the research lifecycle.

We are worried about the long-term impacts from these acquisitions and are concerned that such changes are not in the best interests of the library community. Therefore, we feel obligated to begin exploring alternatives.

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"Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2017

Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren has published "Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing..

Here's an excerpt:

Given the demand for open access publishing in the context of expensive article processing charges and acquisition costs scholarly publishing needs to be transformed. I believe that university libraries are in a good position to contribute to this change. I begin with describing what Stockholm University Press is, what we do and how. I continue with describing why we do it and for whom. I conclude by pointing out some lessons learned.

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"Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 22nd, 2017

Jason Colman has published "Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

To solve this problem [publishing open access books], Michigan Publishing Services has developed both a house service publishing imprint, Maize Books, and a white-labeled book publishing program, branded by University units, all running on the same technical and financial infrastructure. With an emphasis on Open Access with flexible Creative Commons licensing and affordable Print on Demand and EBook options combine workflow efficiencies with a menu of chargeback services to cover the costs of their production and allow staffing to be scaled to meet emerging needs.

This brief case study details Michigan Publishing Services’s program for books as it stands today, explains its approach to sustainability, and offers a few thoughts about when this model is suitable and when it is not.

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"Why Book Selection by Librarians No Longer Matters"

Posted in Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 18th, 2017

David W. Lewis has self-archived "Why Book Selection by Librarians No Longer Matters."

Here's an excerpt:

Prediction about the future use of a book and using this prediction as the basis for a purchase decision only matters if the time required to acquire the book is greater than the time the user who needs the book is willing to wait for it. . . .. With print-on -demand and overnight shipping most print books can be delivered in 24 to 48 hours, which meets the needs of many users. This means that prediction of possible future use whether by expert librarian selectors or by algorithms, such as approval plans, is unnecessary. No prediction is necessary if the needed books can be delivered quickly enough to satisfy the person needing the book.

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Dean of the University Library at University of Connecticut

Posted in ARL Libraries, Research Libraries on August 17th, 2017

The University of Connecticut is recruiting a Dean of the University Library.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The Dean will provide vision, strategic direction, and operational leadership for the libraries, working with talented and accomplished librarians, staff, faculty, and students to meet the University's educational mission and ambitious goals for growth. The Dean will create an environment and community that supports expert practice and research and assure that the University’s libraries continue to serve their faculty and students with programs of the highest quality and effectiveness.

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Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on August 17th, 2017

Ithaka S+R has released Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.

Here's an excerpt:

There is widespread frustration within the academic library community with the seemingly uncontrollable price increases of e-resources, especially of licensed bundles of scholarly journals. The scholarly communications movement has vastly expanded academic and indeed public access to scholarly content. Yet prices for certain scholarly resources continue to outpace budget increases, and librarians do not feel in control of budgets and pricing. What if libraries found ways to bring together the whole library behind the objective of stabilizing or reducing what they pay?

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"De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto"

Posted in Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on August 15th, 2017

Carolyn Moritz et al. have self-archived "De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto."

Here's an excerpt:

Digital scholarship is an evolving area of librarianship. In this piece we propose 10 theses, statements about what this kind of work DOES, rather than trying to define with it IS. We believe that digitally-inflected research and learning, and the characteristics they employ, are essential to the recentering of our profession's position in/across the academy. We also believe that the "digital scholarship center" has served its time, and that the activities and models for digital scholarship work are core to librarianship. This manifesto is meant to serve as a starting point for a necessary discussion, not an end-all, be-all. We hope others will write and share counter-manifestos, passionate responses, or affirming statements.

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Lessons From History: The Copyright Office Belongs in the Library of Congress

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on August 11th, 2017

ALA has released Lessons From History: The Copyright Office Belongs in the Library of Congress.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Prompted by persistent legislative and other proposals to remove the CO from the Library in both the current and most recent Congresses, [Alisa] Holahan's analysis comprehensively reviews the history of the locus of copyright activities from 1870 to the present day. In addition to providing a longer historical perspective, the Report finds that Congress has examined this issue at roughly 20-year intervals, declining to separate the CO and Library each time.

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