Archive for the 'Research Libraries' Category

"The Trending Academic Library Job Market: An Analysis of Library Position Announcements from 2011 with Comparisons to 1996 and 1988"

Posted in Research Libraries on August 25th, 2015

Therese F. Triumph and Penny M. Beile have published "The Trending Academic Library Job Market: An Analysis of Library Position Announcements from 2011 with Comparisons to 1996 and 1988" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

The primary objective of the study was to describe the number, types and titles, requested qualifications and skills, salary information, and locations of positions advertised in 2011 on the ALA JobLIST and ARL Job Announcements websites and in the print version of the Chronicle of Higher Education for purposes of determining the current state of the academic library job market in the United States. To investigate changes in the academic library job market and identify emerging trends over a 23-year period, results also were compared to studies that analyzed position announcements from 1996 and 1988.

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    "University Data Policies and Library Data Services: Who Owns Your Data?"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on August 24th, 2015

    Lisa D. Zilinski, Abigail Goben and Kristin Briney have published "University Data Policies and Library Data Services: Who Owns Your Data?" in the Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

    Here's an excerpt:

    A review of research data and library data services presented on the websites of 206 top research universities as of July 2014 provided insights into policies and practices. Limited to publicly accessible information, the review indicated about half of the surveyed libraries offer some type of data services beyond a resource guide, about four in 10 had a librarian fully or partly dedicated to data management support and about one in 10 had a dedicated data repository. Institutions are likely to have a specific data policy if they are more involved in research and have higher research spending, have larger faculties and offer data services or a data librarian.

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      The Once and Future Publishing Library

      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication on August 3rd, 2015

      The Council on Library and Information Resources has released The Once and Future Publishing Library .

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      The report explores the revitalization of library publishing and its possible future, and examines elements that influence the success and sustainability of library publishing initiatives.

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        "What Cost and Usage Data Reveals About E-Book Acquisitions: Ramifications for Collection Development"

        Posted in E-Books, Electronic Resources, Research Libraries on July 31st, 2015

        Steven B. Carrico et al. have published "What Cost and Usage Data Reveals About E-Book Acquisitions: Ramifications for Collection Development" in Library Resources & Technical Services.

        Here's an excerpt:

        To better determine how e-book acquisitions might affect future collection development decisions, a team of librarians from the University of Florida (UF) launched a project to assess cost and usage of e-books purchased using three different acquisitions methods: e-books acquired in large publisher packages; single-title e-books selected through firm orders; and e-books purchased through two patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) plans. . . . The authors compared the cost-usage data of e-books acquired by the acquisitions methods across the three subject areas and describe how the findings are affecting current and future acquisitions, traditional collection management, and budgeting at UF.

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          "’Total Cost of Ownership’ of Scholarly Communication: Managing Subscription and APC Payments Together"

          Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on July 28th, 2015

          Stuart Lawson has self-archived "'Total Cost of Ownership' of Scholarly Communication: Managing Subscription and APC Payments Together."

          Here's an excerpt:

          Managing subscription journals and open access charges together has created challenges which may in part be dealt with by offsetting the two revenue streams against each other. In order to do this, it is necessary to have reliable financial data about the extent of the two interacting markets. Jisc Collections has been undertaking data collection regarding universities' article publication charge (APC) expenditure. This process is difficult without a standardized way of recording data, so Jisc Collections has developed a standard data collection template and is helping institutions to release data openly. If available data become more comprehensive and transparent, then all parties (libraries, publishers, research funders, and intermediaries) will have better knowledge of the APC market and can more accurately predict the effects of offsetting.

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            "A Library in the Palm of Your Hand: Mobile Services in Top 100 University Libraries"

            Posted in Research Libraries, Social Media/Web 2.0 on July 24th, 2015

            Yan Quan Liu and Sarah Briggs have published "A Library in the Palm of Your Hand: Mobile Services in Top 100 University Libraries" in Information Technology and Libraries.

            Here's an excerpt:

            What is the current state of mobile services among academic libraries of the country's top 100 universities, and what are the best practices for librarians implementing mobile services at the university level? Through in-depth website visits and survey questionnaires, the authors studied each of the top 100 universities' libraries' experiences with mobile services. Results showed that all of these libraries offered at least one mobile service, and the majority offered multiple services. The most common mobile services offered were mobile sites, text messaging services, e-books, and mobile access to databases and the catalog. In addition, chat/IM services, social media accounts and apps were very popular. Survey responses also indicated a trend towards responsive design for websites so that patrons can access the library's full site on any mobile device. Respondents recommend that libraries considering offering mobile services begin as soon as possible as patron demand for these services is expected to increase.

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              "NIH Approves Strategic Vision to Transform National Library of Medicine"

              Posted in Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on July 23rd, 2015

              National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., today approved a federal report (PDF – 163KB) that lays out the long-term scientific vision for the NIH’s National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest biomedical library. This vision, presented today at the 110th meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), calls for NIH to position the NLM as a unifying force in biomedicine that promotes and accelerates knowledge generation, dissemination and understanding in the United States and internationally. The report also cites the need to make NLM the epicenter for biomedical data science, not just at NIH, but across the biomedical research enterprise. In addition, the report recommends dramatically expanding NLM’s activities to include research conducted beyond NIH’s walls to funded institutions, enabling it to have a greater and wider impact on data science than ever before. NIH plans to work with Congress to implement the necessary infrastructure changes to move this vision forward.

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                "Bigger on the Inside: Building Research Data Services at the University of Virginia"

                Posted in ARL Libraries, Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Research Libraries on July 20th, 2015

                Michele Claibourn has published "Bigger on the Inside: Building Research Data Services at the University of Virginia" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

                Here's an excerpt:

                Every story has a beginning, where the narrator chooses to start, though this is rarely the genesis. This story begins with the launch of the University of Virginia Library's new Research Data Services unit in October 2013. Born from the conjoining of a data management team and a data analysis team, Research Data Services expanded to encompass data discovery and acquisitions, research software support, and new expertise in the use of restricted data. Our purpose is to respond to the challenges created by the growing ubiquity and scale of data by helping researchers acquire, analyze, manage, and archive these resources. We have made serious strides toward becoming 'the face of data services at U.Va.' This article tells a bit of our story so far, relays some early challenges and how we've responded to them, outlines several initial successes, and summarizes a few lessons going forward.

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                  "Barriers to Initiation of Open Source Software Projects in Libraries"

                  Posted in Libraries, Open Source Software, Research Libraries on July 16th, 2015

                  Curtis Thacker and Charles Knutson have published "Barriers to Initiation of Open Source Software Projects in Libraries" in the Code4Lib Journal.

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  Libraries share a number of core values with the Open Source Software (OSS) movement, suggesting there should be a natural tendency toward library participation in OSS projects. However Dale Askey's 2008 Code4Lib column entitled "We Love Open Source Software. No, You Can't Have Our Code," claims that while libraries are strong proponents of OSS, they are unlikely to actually contribute to OSS projects. He identifies, but does not empirically substantiate, six barriers that he believes contribute to this apparent inconsistency. In this study we empirically investigate not only Askey's central claim but also the six barriers he proposes. In contrast to Askey's assertion, we find that initiation of and contribution to OSS projects are, in fact, common practices in libraries. However, we also find that these practices are far from ubiquitous; as Askey suggests, many libraries do have opportunities to initiate OSS projects, but choose not to do so. Further, we find support for only four of Askey's six OSS barriers. Thus, our results confirm many, but not all, of Askey's assertions.

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                    "Scholarly Communication as a Core Competency: Prevalence, Activities, and Concepts of Scholarly Communication Librarianship as Shown through Job Advertisements"

                    Posted in Open Access, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on July 7th, 2015

                    Craig Finlay et al. have published "Scholarly Communication as a Core Competency: Prevalence, Activities, and Concepts of Scholarly Communication Librarianship as Shown through Job Advertisements" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    INTRODUCTION The dynamic nature of the scholarly communication landscape has produced a need for the creation of positions specifically focused on these issues. Yet, no clear title or job description for scholarly communication librarianship has emerged. The lack of standardization in this area is problematic for educators, professionals, and prospective professionals. METHODS Analyzing 13,869 job advertisements published between 2006 and 2014, this study attempts to examine the prevalence of scholarly communication terms and activities and the types of positions in which these terms and activities appear. RESULTS This study finds an increase in the use of the term "scholarly communication" in the title or text of job advertisements over the last nine years, with more than 7% of positions in the most recent year containing the term. CONCLUSIONS An analysis of the levels of engagement with scholarly communication demonstrates that jobs with substantial levels of engagement are increasing; whereas those requiring passive knowledge or awareness of scholarly communication issues are decreasing. Jobs with scholarly communication as a primary job responsibility are differentiated by a focus on repositories, open access, copyright, authors' rights, and intellectual property differentiate core scholarly communication positions.

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                      "The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management"

                      Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2015

                      Adelia Grabowsky has published "The Impact of Open Access on Collection Management" in Virginia Libraries.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      This article examines if and how the integration of OA materials has changed collection and/or access management activities within academic libraries.

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                        Digital Video Recordings from the 2015 Conference: Creating and Supporting Sustainable Publishing Programs

                        Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on May 28th, 2015

                        The Library Publishing Coalition has released digital video recordings from the 2015 Conference: Creating and Supporting Sustainable Publishing Programs.

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