Archive for the 'Scholarly Journals' Category

"The Costs of Open and Closed Access: Using the Finnish Research Output as an Example"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 7th, 2016

Jyrki Ilva et al. have published "The Costs of Open and Closed Access: Using the Finnish Research Output as an Example" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

As business models of Open Access publishing are still under development, the aim of our paper is to assess the statistical tools and data that the Finnish libraries currently have for comparing the costs associated with different modes of disseminating scientific publications. We will also analyse the potential costs associated with Open Access publishing models and compare them with the current cost structure of—mostly—paywalled (PW) access. . . . We will discuss the alternatives on how best to develop statistical tools to estimate the true costs of scientific publishing.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Small Scholar-Led Scholarly Journals: Can They Survive and Thrive in an Open Access Future?"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 6th, 2016

Heather Morrison has published "Small Scholar-Led Scholarly Journals: Can They Survive and Thrive in an Open Access Future?" in Learned Publishing (open access article).

Here's an excerpt:

This article presents early results of a research project designed to further our understanding of how to ensure that small scholar-led journals can survive and thrive in a global open access knowledge commons. This phase of the research focuses on generation of ideas through interviews and focus groups with 15 participants involved in producing small scholar-led journals that either are or would like to become open access. Although a couple of journals reported that they could survive in an open access future based on existing resources, most were concerned about survival and none expressed confidence that they could thrive in an open-access future.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Cambridge Press v. Georgia State University: "Here We Go Again: Latest GSU Ruling an Odd Victory for Libraries"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Journals on April 6th, 2016

Kevin Smith has published "Here We Go Again: Latest GSU Ruling an Odd Victory for Libraries" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

Here's an excerpt:

So this ruling, like each ruling in the case, is clearly a disaster for the plaintiff publishers. Once again it establishes that there is significant space for fair use in higher education, even when that use is not transformative. Nevertheless, it is a difficult victory for libraries, in the sense that the analysis it uses is not one we can replicate; we simply do not have access to the extensive data about revenue, of which Judge Evans makes such complex use.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications

Posted in Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Research Tools, Scholarly Journals on March 30th, 2016

Simon Inger Consulting Ltd has released How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

This report is the output of a large-scale survey of readers of scholarly publications (n=40439) and their behaviour in the discovery of journal articles and online books. The survey was conducted during October, November, and December of 2015. While usage statistics and analytics gathered by publishers, libraries and intermediaries can give us a partial view of discovery behaviour, there are many gaps in the knowledge that these can provide which we have endeavoured to fill by aski ng readers what tools they use in discovery.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Open Access, Open Science, Open Society"

Posted in Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 25th, 2016

Thomas Margoni et al. have self-archived "Open Access, Open Science, Open Society."

Here's an excerpt:

The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that Open Access is a key enabler of Open Science, which in turn will lead to a more Open Society. Furthermore, the paper argues that while legislative interventions play an important role in the top-down regulation of Open Access, legislators currently lack an informed and systematic vision on the role of Open Access in science and society. In this historical phase, other complementary forms of intervention (bottom-up) appear much more "informed" and effective. This paper, which intends to set the stage for future research, identifies a few pieces of the puzzle: the relationship between formal and informal norms in the field of Open Science and how these impact on intellectual property rights, the protection of personal data, the assessment of science and the technology employed for the communication of science.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics Publishes 10,000th Article

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 23rd, 2016

The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) has published its 10,000th article.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

SCOAP3 celebrates the publication of its 10,000th Open Access article. Since the start of its operation in 2014, the initiative has supported Open Access publication of High-Energy-Physics articles in 10 high-quality peer-reviewed journals. More than 18,000 scientists from over 90 countries have benefited from this initiative without any financial or administrative burden, retain copyright of their work and automatically comply with their institutional or funders Open Access mandates.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

OA2020 Initiative Launched

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 22nd, 2016

The OA2020 Initiative has launched with an "Expression of Interest in the Large-scale Implementation of Open Access to Scholarly Journals."

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

A growing number of research organizations want to establish an international initiative which aims to convert the majority of today's scholarly journals from subscription to Open Access (OA) publishing. This is the result of the 12th Berlin Open Access Conference hosted by the Max Planck Society in December 2015. An Expression of Interest, published today and already adopted by thirty signatories, invites all parties involved in scholarly publishing to collaborate on a swift and efficient transition for the benefit of scholarship and society at large.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Open Access Publishing in Higher Education: Charting the Challenging Course to Academic and Financial Sustainability"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 21st, 2016

Mark I. Greenberg has published "Open Access Publishing in Higher Education: Charting the Challenging Course to Academic and Financial Sustainability" in the Journal of Educational Controversy.

Here's an excerpt:

The benefits, pitfalls, and sustainability of open access publishing are hotly debated. Commercial publishers dominate the marketplace and oppose alternative publishing models that threaten their bottom line. Scholars' use of open access remains relatively limited due to awareness and perceived benefits to their professional goals. Readership of open access publications is generally strong, but some people disagree that more readers leads to increased citations and research impact. Libraries have grown their influence by supporting and promoting open access, but these efforts come with significant financial costs. Today, open access has flourished most significantly as a philosophy: the belief that the world's scholarship should be freely available to readers and that publicly funded research, in particular, should be accessible to the taxpayers who paid for it.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Researchers’ Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges: A Case Study Using Innovation Diffusion Theory"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 18th, 2016

Stephen Pinfield and Christine Middleton have published "Researchers' Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges: A Case Study Using Innovation Diffusion Theory" in SAGE Open.

Here's an excerpt:

This article analyzes researchers' adoption of an institutional central fund (or faculty publication fund) for open-access (OA) article-processing charges (APCs) to contribute to a wider understanding of take-up of OA journal publishing ("Gold" OA). Quantitative data, recording central fund usage at the University of Nottingham from 2006 to 2014, are analyzed alongside qualitative data from institutional documentation. The importance of the settings of U.K. national policy developments and international OA adoption trends are considered. Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) is used as an explanatory framework.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Converting Scholarly Journals to Open Access: A Review of Approaches and Experiences

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Journals on March 17th, 2016

The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication has released a draft of Converting Scholarly Journals to Open Access: A Review of Approaches and Experiences for comment.

Here's an excerpt:

This report identifies ways through which subscription-based scholarly journals have converted their publishing models to open access (OA). The major goal was to identify specific scenarios that have been used or proposed for transitioning subscription journals to OA so that these scenarios can provide options for others seeking to "flip" their journals to OA.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Publication Phishing: A Growing Challenge for Researchers and Scientific Societies"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2016

Shahryar Sorooshian has published "Publication Phishing: A Growing Challenge for Researchers and Scientific Societies" in Current Science.

Here's an excerpt:

Specifically, hijacked journals are those that scam researchers using identifiers and reputation of their original counterpart. These fraudsters present themselves as the principal journal editors by designing an on-line website for existing journals that offers print-only access, but lacks on-line or electronic access

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

"Three Years after the OSTP Public Access Directive: A Progress Report"

Posted in Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 10th, 2016

Fred Dylla has published "Three Years after the OSTP Public Access Directive: A Progress Report" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

So three years out from the directive, 1) public access policy is in place for 98% of the research funding from US federal agencies starting in the last year, 2) a robust article identification system is in place from Crossref that is already tracking more than 11,000 funding agencies worldwide, 3) CHORUS, a public-private partnership, is actively assisting the agencies with implementing their public access plans, 4) TDM solutions are beginning to appear, and 5) agencies, supported by various stakeholders, are making some headway on data management.

Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap


Page 5 of 48« First...34567...102030...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2016 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.