Archive for the 'Copyright' Category

Lessons From History: The Copyright Office Belongs in the Library of Congress

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries on August 11th, 2017

ALA has released Lessons From History: The Copyright Office Belongs in the Library of Congress.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Prompted by persistent legislative and other proposals to remove the CO from the Library in both the current and most recent Congresses, [Alisa] Holahan's analysis comprehensively reviews the history of the locus of copyright activities from 1870 to the present day. In addition to providing a longer historical perspective, the Report finds that Congress has examined this issue at roughly 20-year intervals, declining to separate the CO and Library each time.

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"For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing, Research Libraries on August 5th, 2017

Andrew Albanese has published "For Second Time, Appeals Court Hears GSU E-Reserves Case" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

In the hearing, which went for just over an hour, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit in Atlanta, once again pressed attorneys for the fault lines in the decade-old copyright case, with much of the hearing focusing on whether Judge Orinda Evans correctly evaluated the fourth factor of the four factor fair use test (the effect on the market), and then properly weighted that factor in making her fair use determinations.

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"Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature"

Posted in Copyright, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 25th, 2017

Daniel S Himmelstein et al. have published "Sci-Hub Provides Access to Nearly All Scholarly Literature" in PeerJ.

Here's an excerpt:

Since its creation in 2011, Sci-Hub has grown rapidly in popularity. However, until now, the extent of Sci-Hub's coverage was unclear. As of March 2017, we find that Sci-Hub's database contains 68.9% of all 81.6 million scholarly articles, which rises to 85.2% for those published in closed access journals. Furthermore, Sci-Hub contains 77.0% of the 5.2 million articles published by inactive journals. Coverage varies by discipline, with 92.8% coverage of articles in chemistry journals compared to 76.3% for computer science. Coverage also varies by publisher, with the coverage of the largest publisher, Elsevier, at 97.3%.

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"EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Google and Other Search Engines, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on July 21st, 2017

COMMUNIA has released "EU Research Committee Wants to Gift Publishers New Rights to Restrict Access to Scientific Research."

Here's an excerpt:

Last week the Culture and Education Committee (CULT) and the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) voted on their final opinions on the Commission’s Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. . . .

The introduction of a new right for press publishers (aka the “link tax”) to extract fees from search engines for incorporating short snippets of—or even linking to—their content in article 11 is one of the most controversial issues of the proposed directive. Adopting this type of ancillary right at the EU level would have a strong negative impact on all stakeholders, including publishers, authors, journalists, researchers, online service providers, and readers. . . .

In the votes last week in the CULT and ITRE committees, the press publishers right was also carried through – and even expanded. Both of the recent opinions remove the restriction that the right applies to digital uses only, meaning that if adopted it would cover all uses—both digital and in print. Even worse, ITRE—the committee responsible for policy relating to the promotion of research—voted to extend the press publishers right to cover scientific publications.

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"American Chemical Society Files Suit against Sci-Hub"

Posted in Copyright, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 30th, 2017

The American Chemical Society has released "American Chemical Society Files Suit against Sci-Hub."

Here's an excerpt:

On June 23, 2017, the American Chemical Society (ACS) filed suit in the United States District Court Eastern District of Virginia against unnamed confederates of Sci-Hub, a self-proclaimed web pirate organization that steals and then illegally reproduces and disseminates copyrighted scientific research articles on the internet. The suit asserts infringement of the professional Society’s copyrights, as well as counterfeiting and infringement of its trademarks.

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"Copyright Reform Is Never Happening"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars on April 18th, 2017

Andrew Albanese has published "Copyright Reform Is Never Happening" in Publishers Weekly.

Here's an excerpt:

But here's what’s most troublesome to me: this bill [the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act (H.R. 1695)] can so easily be seen as an attempt to keep Maria Pallante's views on copyright intact at the Copyright Office, that it could very well taint anything that might eventually come from the House Judiciary Committee review.

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"Looking into Pandora’s Box: The Content of Sci-Hub and Its Usage"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 11th, 2017

Bastian Greshake has self-archived "Looking into Pandora's Box: The Content of Sci-Hub and Its Usage."

Here's an excerpt:

By utilizing the recently released corpus of Sci-Hub and comparing it to the data of ~28 million downloads done through the service, this study tries to address some of these questions. The comparative analysis shows that both the usage and complete corpus is largely made up of recently published articles, with users disproportionately favoring newer articles and 35% of downloaded articles being published after 2013. These results hint that embargo periods before publications become Open Access are frequently circumnavigated using Guerilla Open Access approaches like Sci-Hub.

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"National Library Groups Oppose Bill to Make Register of Copyrights a Presidential Appointee"

Posted in Copyright, Legislation and Government Regulation on March 27th, 2017

Kara Malenfant has published "National Library Groups Oppose Bill to Make Register of Copyrights a Presidential Appointee" in ACRL Insider.

Here's an excerpt:

It’s also difficult to understand how the public or Congress itself would benefit from politicization of the Register of Copyrights' position by making it subject to presidential appointment and Senate confirmation, as this legislation proposes. Such politicization of the position necessarily would result in a Register more actively engaged in policy development than in competent management and modernization.

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"Leveraging Exceptions and Limitations for Digital Curation and Online Collections: The U.S. Case"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Archives and Special Collections, Digital Copyright Wars, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 17th, 2017

Patricia Aufderheide has published "Leveraging Exceptions and Limitations for Digital Curation and Online Collections: The U.S. Case" in Libellarium: Journal for the Research of Writing, Books, and Cultural Heritage Institutions.

Here's an excerpt:

Librarians wanting to use digital affordances for their patron’s and public benefit have increasingly found themselves frustrated by copyright law designed for a pre-digital era. In the U.S., this frustration has driven the nation’s most prestigious library group, the Association of Research Libraries, to explore the utility of the major exception to copyright monopoly rights, fair use, in order to accomplish basic curation and collection goals in a digital era. The ARL's efforts to clarify how libraries can employ fair use has resulted in sometimes-dramatic changes in how work is done, and has permitted innovation at some universities. Its approach demonstrates the power of consensus in a professional field to permit innovation within the law.

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"Copyright Compliance and Infringement in ResearchGate Full-Text Journal Articles"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Prints, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals, Self-Archiving on March 2nd, 2017

Hamid R. Jamali has self-archived "Copyright Compliance and Infringement in ResearchGate Full-Text Journal Articles."

Here's an excerpt:

This study aims to investigate the extent to which ResearchGate members as authors of journal articles comply with publishers' copyright policies when they self-archive full-text of their articles on ResearchGate. . . . The key finding was that 201 (51.3%) out of 392 non-OA articles infringed the copyright and were non-compliant with publishers' policy. While 88.3% of journals allowed some form of self-archiving (SHERPA/RoMEO green, blue or yellow journals), the majority of non-compliant cases (97.5%) occurred when authors self-archived publishers' PDF files (final published version).

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"’Notice-and-Stay-Down’ Is Really ‘Filter-Everything’"

Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars on February 24th, 2017

Elliot Harmon has published "'Notice-and-Stay-Down' Is Really 'Filter-Everything'" in Deeplinks.

Here's an excerpt:

There's a debate happening right now over copyright bots, programs that social media websites use to scan users’ uploads for potential copyright infringement. A few powerful lobbyists want copyright law to require platforms that host third-party content to employ copyright bots, and require them to be stricter about what they take down. Big content companies call this nebulous proposal "notice-and-stay-down," but it would really keep all users down, not just alleged infringers. In the process, it could give major content platforms like YouTube and Facebook an unfair advantage over competitors and startups (as if they needed any more advantages). "Notice-and-stay-down" is really "filter-everything."

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"Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on February 21st, 2017

Richard Poynder has published "Copyright: The Immoveable Barrier That Open Access Advocates Underestimated."

Here's an excerpt:

In calling for research papers to be made freely available open access advocates promised that doing so would lead to a simpler, less costly, more democratic, and more effective scholarly communication system. To achieve their objectives they proposed two different ways of providing open access: green OA (self-archiving) and gold OA (open access publishing). However, while the OA movement has succeeded in persuading research institutions and funders of the merits of open access, it has failed to win the hearts and minds of most researchers. More importantly, it is not achieving its objectives. There are various reasons for this, but above all it is because OA advocates underestimated the extent to which copyright would subvert their cause.

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