Archive for the 'Copyright' Category

"Creative Commons Confusion Continues to Confound Content Creators"

Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses on December 11th, 2014

David Crotty has published "Creative Commons Confusion Continues to Confound Content Creators" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

Here's an excerpt:

Yahoo!, owners of the photo sharing site Flickr, recently caused a storm of controversy by announcing plans to sell prints of photos that users had uploaded. Yahoo!'s plans included sharing 51% of revenue with users who had retained copyright on their photos. For those who voluntarily selected a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY) for their works, no compensation was offered. Despite the fact that Yahoo! was explicitly following the terms of the license, and doing exactly what the license was designed to promote, users were up in arms over seeing a large corporation taking advantage of their labors.

Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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    Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers

    Posted in Copyright, Libraries, Research Libraries on December 11th, 2014

    ACRL has released Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers by Kevin L. Smith. It is available in print and digital formats, including an open access PDF.

    Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

    Copyright and other types of laws regulating intellectual property create an increasing concern for contemporary scholarship. The digital environment has created exciting new opportunities and possibilities for scholars to work and distribute their work. But these new opportunities also create issues that did not arise in the analog world. Owning and Using Scholarship demystifies intellectual property, and especially copyright law, for academic authors and independent scholars who face these dilemmas. It also serves as a comprehensive resource for librarians who are asked to assist with these new and challenging decisions.

    Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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      State of the Commons

      Posted in Copyright, Creative Commons/Open Licenses on November 21st, 2014

      The Creative Commons has released State of the Commons.

      Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

      Today, we're releasing a new report that we think you will want to see. State of the Commons covers the impact and success of free and open content worldwide, and it contains the most revealing account we've ever published, including new data on what's shared with a CC license.

      We found nearly 900 million Creative Commons-licensed works, dramatically up from our last report of 400 million in 2010. Creators are now choosing less restrictive CC licenses more than ever before – over half allow both commercial use and adaptations.

      We're also celebrating the success of open policy worldwide. Fourteen countries have now adopted national open education policies, and open textbooks have saved students more than 100 million dollars. These are big moves making big impacts.

      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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        "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History"

        Posted in Copyright, Open Access, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

        James Shulman has published "Sustainable Free: Lessons Learned from the Launch of a Free Service Supporting Publishing in Art History" in LIBER Quarterly.

        Here's an excerpt:

        Hilary Ballon and Mariet Westermann, writing about the struggles of publishing in art history noted that "It is a paradox of the digital revolution that it has never been easier to produce and circulate a reproductive image, and never harder to publish one." If publishing in general is in crisis because of the seismic re-ordering in a digital world, the field of art history is the extreme tail of the spectrum; rights holders are accustomed to licensing image content for limited edition print runs. Given this particularly challenging corner of the publishing work, a project initiated by the Metropolitan Museum offers some hope of a collaborative way forward. What sociological re-engineering enabled progress on this problem? It is possible that there are other lessons here too, that might throw at least streaks of light on other process re-engineering provoked by digital innovation in publishing?

        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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          "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)"

          Posted in Copyright, Emerging Technologies, Publishing on November 17th, 2014

          Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust, and Charles Oppenheim have published "The Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining (TDM)" in D-Lib Magazine.

          Here's an excerpt:

          The ideas of textual or data mining (TDM) and subsequent analysis go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Originally carried out manually, textual and data analysis has long been a tool which has enabled new insights to be drawn from text corpora. However, for the potential benefits of TDM to be unlocked, a number of non-technological barriers need to be overcome. These include legal uncertainty resulting from complicated copyright, database rights and licensing, the fact that some publishers are not currently embracing the opportunities TDM offers the academic community, and a lack of awareness of TDM among many academics, alongside a skills gap.

          Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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            "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling"

            Posted in Copyright, E-Reserves, Publishing on November 14th, 2014

            Kevin L. Smith has published "Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling" in Library Journal.

            Here's an excerpt:

            The word "incentive" appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              UK Launches New Licensing Program for 91 Million Orphan Works

              Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, Legislation and Government Regulation on November 4th, 2014

              The UK has launched a new licensing program for orphan works that will cover around 91 million works.

              Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

              A new licensing scheme launched today (29 October 2014) could give wider access to at least 91 million culturally valuable creative works-including diaries, photographs, oral history recordings and documentary films.

              These works are covered by copyright, but rights holders cannot be found by those who need to seek permission to reproduce them. Under the new scheme, a licence can be granted by the Intellectual Property Office so that these works can be reproduced on websites, in books and on TV without breaking the law, while protecting the rights of owners so they can be remunerated if they come forward.

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                Fair-Use and E-Reserves: "A Reversal for Georgia State"

                Posted in Copyright, Digital Copyright Wars, E-Reserves, Publishing on October 20th, 2014

                Kevin Smith has published "A Reversal for Georgia State" in Scholarly Communications @ Duke.

                Here's an excerpt:

                The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals has issued its ruling in the publisher appeal of a district court decision that found most instances of electronic reserve copying at Georgia State to be fair use. The appellate court ruling is 129 pages long, and I will have much more to say after I read it carefully. But the hot news right now is that the Court of Appeals has reversed the District Court's judgment and remanded the case back for proceedings consistent with the new opinion. The injunction issued by the District Court and the order awarding costs and attorney's fees to GSU have been vacated.

                Read more about it at "Publishers Win Reversal of Court Ruling That Favored 'E-Reserves' at Georgia State U." and "A Win for Publishers."

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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