Archive for the 'Scholarly Books' Category

"Cost Estimates of an Open Access Mandate for Monographs in the UK’s Third Research Excellence Framework"

Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on November 14th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Martin Paul Eve et al. have published "Cost Estimates of an Open Access Mandate for Monographs in the UK's Third Research Excellence Framework" in Insights.

Here's an excerpt:

The recent ‘Consultation on the second Research Excellence Framework' (REF) in the UK contains an annex that signals the extension of the open access mandate to monographs. In the service of promoting discussion, rather than prescribing a forward route, this article estimates the costs of implementing such a mandate based on REF 2014 volume, taking the criteria signalled in the annex, and identifies funding sources that could support it. We estimate that to publish 75% of anticipated monographic submission output for the next REF would require approximately £96m investment over the census period. This is equivalent to £19.2m per year. Academic library budgets as they are currently apportioned would not support this cost. However, these sums are but a fraction of the total quality-related funding, Arts and Humanities Research Council and Economic and Social Research Council budgets. We close with a series of provocative suggestions for how the mandate could be implemented.

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"Dissertation to Book? A Snapshot of Dissertations Published As Books in 2014 and 2105, Available in Open Access Institutional Repositories"

Posted in Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Self-Archiving on October 26th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Anna Marie Johnson et al. have published "Dissertation to Book? A Snapshot of Dissertations Published As Books in 2014 and 2105, Available in Open Access Institutional Repositories" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

Only a small percentage of books published as dissertations were found in ProQuest and then subsequently in IRs. The number of libraries holding book titles with corresponding dissertations in IRs dropped between 2014 and 2015.

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"Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case"

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on August 22nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren has published "Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing..

Here's an excerpt:

Given the demand for open access publishing in the context of expensive article processing charges and acquisition costs scholarly publishing needs to be transformed. I believe that university libraries are in a good position to contribute to this change. I begin with describing what Stockholm University Press is, what we do and how. I continue with describing why we do it and for whom. I conclude by pointing out some lessons learned.

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"Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan"

Posted in ARL Libraries, Creative Commons/Open Licenses, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 22nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jason Colman has published "Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan" in the Journal of Electronic Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

To solve this problem [publishing open access books], Michigan Publishing Services has developed both a house service publishing imprint, Maize Books, and a white-labeled book publishing program, branded by University units, all running on the same technical and financial infrastructure. With an emphasis on Open Access with flexible Creative Commons licensing and affordable Print on Demand and EBook options combine workflow efficiencies with a menu of chargeback services to cover the costs of their production and allow staffing to be scaled to meet emerging needs.

This brief case study details Michigan Publishing Services’s program for books as it stands today, explains its approach to sustainability, and offers a few thoughts about when this model is suitable and when it is not.

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"Why Book Selection by Librarians No Longer Matters"

Posted in Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on August 18th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

David W. Lewis has self-archived "Why Book Selection by Librarians No Longer Matters."

Here's an excerpt:

Prediction about the future use of a book and using this prediction as the basis for a purchase decision only matters if the time required to acquire the book is greater than the time the user who needs the book is willing to wait for it. . . .. With print-on -demand and overnight shipping most print books can be delivered in 24 to 48 hours, which meets the needs of many users. This means that prediction of possible future use whether by expert librarian selectors or by algorithms, such as approval plans, is unnecessary. No prediction is necessary if the needed books can be delivered quickly enough to satisfy the person needing the book.

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Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Posted in Licenses, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Serials Crisis on August 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Ithaka S+R has released Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.

Here's an excerpt:

There is widespread frustration within the academic library community with the seemingly uncontrollable price increases of e-resources, especially of licensed bundles of scholarly journals. The scholarly communications movement has vastly expanded academic and indeed public access to scholarly content. Yet prices for certain scholarly resources continue to outpace budget increases, and librarians do not feel in control of budgets and pricing. What if libraries found ways to bring together the whole library behind the objective of stabilizing or reducing what they pay?

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"The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals, University Presses on August 2nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Janneke Adema and Graham Stone have published "The Surge in New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing: An Overview of a Changing Publishing Ecology in the UK" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This article outlines the rise and development of New University Presses and Academic-Led Presses in the UK or publishing for the UK market. Based on the Jisc research project, Changing publishing ecologies: a landscape study of new university presses and academic-led publishing, commonalities between these two types of presses are identified to better assess their future needs and requirements. Based on this analysis, the article argues for the development of a publishing toolkit, for further research into the creation of a typology of presses and publishing initiatives, and for support with community building to help these initiatives grow and develop further, whilst promoting a more diverse publishing ecology.

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Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 24th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Jisc has released Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2016 we commissioned a research project focused on institutional publishing initiatives which includes academic-led publishing ventures (ALPs) as well as new university presses and library-led initiatives (NUPs). We are pleased to announce the publication of the report 'Changing Publishing Ecologies. A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-led Publishing', which charts the outcomes of this research. . . .

The NUP and ALP strands of the research study were co-ordinated and run in tandem by [Janneke] [Graham] Stone and Adema. This study was informed by a desk top review of current library publishing ventures in the US, Europe and Australia and an overview of international academic-led initiatives and their existing and future directions. The NUP strand consisted of a survey, which collected 43 responses, where the ALP strand was informed by interviews with 14 scholar-led presses. Taking different approaches for these two types of press, the report captures the take-up, reasoning and characteristics of these initiatives, as well as their future plans.

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"Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 18th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Martin Paul Eve has published "Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities" in the Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) has been shaping and benefiting the scientific community for years now, but this new wave of disseminating research freely has not quite taken hold in the field of humanities. Though humanities publishers could also benefit from an OA model, many have been resistant, citing possible issues with plagiarism or appropriation of an author's work for less than ideal uses. There are also challenges with the cost of publishing OA content, which for humanities could be much higher than in the scientific community due to the length of works produced.

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"E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on July 13th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Angela Conyers et al. have published "E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article summarizes how libraries and library consortia are acquiring and evaluating e-books, how usage statistics feature within library workflows, the issues faced in doing so and the resulting impact of these issues on understanding usage and informing purchasing of new titles. Discussions with publishers indicate how usage data are being used within the organization, the requirements of customers and the challenges involved in providing usage data for e-books. Assessing and evaluating e-book usage is a complex and challenging task with processes and workflows in development. A transition from print to e-books represents a significant change for libraries, and the availability of reliable usage statistics to support purchase decisions is vital.

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A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher

Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 19th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail, LISTSERV, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal. Imagine that the latest mid-range PC has a 6 MHz 16/32-bit 80386SX processor, a 30 MB hard drive, and 2 MB of RAM and costs about $3,900.

That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list, after distributing some photocopied handouts at the ALA Annual meeting. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). PACS-L was sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries. Walt Crawford and Roy Tennant have shared their thoughts about PACS-L in "Talking About Public Access: PACS-L's First Decade" and "Remembering PACS-L."

In August 1989, I launched and began editing The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. It was published by the University of Houston Libraries. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. You can find a history of the journal and links to articles and reviews about it in "The Public-Access Computer Systems Review."

In 1996, I established and began writing the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book, which was published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats. It had 79 subsequent versions. This early e-book was published by the University of Houston Libraries until late 1996. My "Evolution of an Electronic Book: The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography" article recounts the history of the e-book through 2001.

In 2005, I established Digital Scholarship, and I began to write and publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. Since then, Digital Scholarship has published PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

Back in 1989, I never thought that a wacky idea and a few handouts would lead to 28 years of digital publishing projects.

You can find a complete chronology of my digital publishing activities in A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher.

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"Inconsistencies between Academic E-book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on June 14th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

portal: Libraries and the Academy has released and e-print of "Inconsistencies between Academic E-book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results."

Here's an excerpt:

This article presents the results of a study of academic e-books that compared the metadata and search results from major academic e-book platforms. The authors collected data and performed a series of test searches designed to produce the same result regardless of platform. Testing, however, revealed metadata-related errors and significant variation in search results that could impact the user experience. This article describes how other libraries could perform this type of testing and how this information could be used to inform the selection of e-books that are available on multiple platforms.

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