Archive for the 'Scholarly Books' Category

Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 24th, 2017

Jisc has released Changing Publishing Ecologies: A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-Led Publishing.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

In 2016 we commissioned a research project focused on institutional publishing initiatives which includes academic-led publishing ventures (ALPs) as well as new university presses and library-led initiatives (NUPs). We are pleased to announce the publication of the report 'Changing Publishing Ecologies. A Landscape Study of New University Presses and Academic-led Publishing', which charts the outcomes of this research. . . .

The NUP and ALP strands of the research study were co-ordinated and run in tandem by [Janneke] [Graham] Stone and Adema. This study was informed by a desk top review of current library publishing ventures in the US, Europe and Australia and an overview of international academic-led initiatives and their existing and future directions. The NUP strand consisted of a survey, which collected 43 responses, where the ALP strand was informed by interviews with 14 scholar-led presses. Taking different approaches for these two types of press, the report captures the take-up, reasoning and characteristics of these initiatives, as well as their future plans.

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"Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities"

Posted in Digital Humanities, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on July 18th, 2017

Martin Paul Eve has published "Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities" in the Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open access (OA) has been shaping and benefiting the scientific community for years now, but this new wave of disseminating research freely has not quite taken hold in the field of humanities. Though humanities publishers could also benefit from an OA model, many have been resistant, citing possible issues with plagiarism or appropriation of an author's work for less than ideal uses. There are also challenges with the cost of publishing OA content, which for humanities could be much higher than in the scientific community due to the length of works produced.

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"E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on July 13th, 2017

Angela Conyers et al. have published "E-book Usage: Counting the Challenges and Opportunities" in Insights: the UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article summarizes how libraries and library consortia are acquiring and evaluating e-books, how usage statistics feature within library workflows, the issues faced in doing so and the resulting impact of these issues on understanding usage and informing purchasing of new titles. Discussions with publishers indicate how usage data are being used within the organization, the requirements of customers and the challenges involved in providing usage data for e-books. Assessing and evaluating e-book usage is a complex and challenging task with processes and workflows in development. A transition from print to e-books represents a significant change for libraries, and the availability of reliable usage statistics to support purchase decisions is vital.

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A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher

Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on June 19th, 2017

Imagine the Internet without the Web. Imagine that there is no Google or similar search engine. Imagine that the cutting edge Internet applications are e-mail, LISTSERV, FTP, and Telnet (terminal sessions). Imagine that the Internet is made up of a number of different networks, and that the connections between them are not always transparent. Imagine that no established publisher has even experimented with an e-journal. Imagine that the latest mid-range PC has a 6 MHz 16/32-bit 80386SX processor, a 30 MB hard drive, and 2 MB of RAM and costs about $3,900.

That was the situation in June 1989 when I launched PACS-L, a LISTSERV mailing list, after distributing some photocopied handouts at the ALA Annual meeting. PACS-L was one of the first library-oriented mailing lists, and it was unusual in that it had a broad subject focus (public-access computer systems in libraries). PACS-L was sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries. Walt Crawford and Roy Tennant have shared their thoughts about PACS-L in "Talking About Public Access: PACS-L's First Decade" and "Remembering PACS-L."

In August 1989, I launched and began editing The Public-Access Computer Systems Review, one of the first e-journals on the Internet and the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. It was freely available, allowed authors to retain their copyrights, and had special copyright provisions for noncommercial use. It was published by the University of Houston Libraries. Issues were announced via e-mail, and articles were distributed as ASCII files from a LISTSERV. You can find a history of the journal and links to articles and reviews about it in "The Public-Access Computer Systems Review."

In 1996, I established and began writing the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book, which was published in the HTML, PDF, and Word formats. It had 79 subsequent versions. This early e-book was published by the University of Houston Libraries until late 1996. My "Evolution of an Electronic Book: The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography" article recounts the history of the e-book through 2001.

In 2005, I established Digital Scholarship, and I began to write and publish open access works under Creative Commons licenses. Since then, Digital Scholarship has published PDF books, inexpensive paperback books, XHTML bibliographies, weblogs, Twitter streams, and other works.

Back in 1989, I never thought that a wacky idea and a few handouts would lead to 28 years of digital publishing projects.

You can find a complete chronology of my digital publishing activities in A Look Back at 28 Years as an Open Access Publisher.

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"Inconsistencies between Academic E-book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results"

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on June 14th, 2017

portal: Libraries and the Academy has released and e-print of "Inconsistencies between Academic E-book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results."

Here's an excerpt:

This article presents the results of a study of academic e-books that compared the metadata and search results from major academic e-book platforms. The authors collected data and performed a series of test searches designed to produce the same result regardless of platform. Testing, however, revealed metadata-related errors and significant variation in search results that could impact the user experience. This article describes how other libraries could perform this type of testing and how this information could be used to inform the selection of e-books that are available on multiple platforms.

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Final Version: Reimagining the Digital Monograph: Design Thinking to Build New Tools for Researchers

Posted in E-Books, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Scholarly Books on June 13th, 2017

JSTOR has released the final version of Reimagining the Digital Monograph: Design Thinking to Build New Tools for Researchers .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This new version retains much of the structure of the previous one, and it still includes the ethnographic user profiles showing how six scholars do research with print and digital monographs. It also includes minor changes throughout addressing both specific and general questions we received and clarifying many points. We have gone from twelve to thirteen principles for the reimagined monograph. Most significantly, we have added as an appendix a new landscape review of related projects, which helps to situate our work on this project amongst a number of other important initiatives.

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"Digital Public Library of America to Pilot eBook Lending in Fall"

Posted in Digital Libraries, Digital Repositories, E-Books, Libraries, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on June 2nd, 2017

DPLA has released "Digital Public Library of America to Pilot eBook Lending in Fall."

Here's an excerpt:

Planned for this fall, DPLA will be lending ebooks in what it hopes is a streamlined, non-proprietary and vendorless platform.

While ebook lending has grown fast among US public libraries, the process is not always seamless. Book discovery, borrowing, and consumption must happen within the provide'’s app or website. DPLA wants to create a process that isn’t as specific, and one that works with a broader range of content producers for better access to ebooks.

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"Rhyme or Reason?: Patterns in Book Pricing by Format"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Books on May 23rd, 2017

Jonathan Harwell has published "Rhyme or Reason?: Patterns in Book Pricing by Format" in the The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

Here's an excerpt:

This study illuminates the differentials in book pricing by format, which can appear arbitrary and unpredictable. Using the paperback list price as the base, the research uses a sample of 500 titles selected for purchase by a small, private liberal arts college library during a defined time period. I have recorded the prices of paperback, hardcover, single and multiple-user e-books from Ebrary, EBSCO, and Amazon Kindle. The mean pricing differential is calculated for each version across all titles in the sample, as well as for the top five publishers represented in the sample, in order to identify patterns in pricing decisions.

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University of Hawai’i Awarded $90,000 Humanities Open Book Program Grant

Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, University Presses on April 14th, 2017

The University of Hawai'i has received a $90,000 Humanities Open Book Program grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Hawai‘i a $90,000 grant to digitize 100 out-of-print University of Hawai‘i Press books for open access.

The project is part of the Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative between the Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). . . .

Beginning in 2018, the digitized titles will be hosted on a custom open-access portal where readers will be able to download them in EPUB and PDF formats. A print-on-demand option will also be offered for select titles.

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AAU, ARL, and AAUP Will Launch Open Access Monograph Publishing Initiative

Posted in ARL Libraries, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books on March 17th, 2017

AAU, ARL, and AAUP will launch the Open Access Monograph Publishing Initiative this spring.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

The universities and colleges directly participating in this initiative will incorporate three components into their digital monograph publishing projects: provide a baseline university publishing grant of $15,000 to support the publication of an open access, digital monograph of 90,000 words or less (with additional funding for works of greater length or complexity to be negotiated by the author, institution, and publisher); set a target of awarding at least three publishing grants per year; and commit to participating in this initiative for five years.

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"’Just Google It’—The Scope of Freely Available Information Sources for Doctoral Thesis Writing"

Posted in Google and Other Search Engines, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Journals on March 15th, 2017

Vincas Grigas et al. have published "'Just Google It'—The Scope of Freely Available Information Sources for Doctoral Thesis Writing" in Information Research.

Here's an excerpt:

Library collections and subscribed databases could cover up to 80 per cent of all information resources used in doctoral theses. Among the most significant findings to emerge from this study is the fact that on average more than half (57 per cent) of all utilised information resources were freely available or were accessed without library support. We may presume that the library as a direct intermediator for information users is potentially important and irreplaceable only in four out of ten attempts of PhD students to seek information.

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Emory University Gets $1.2 million Grant for Open Access Humanities Publishing Program

Posted in Grants, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books on February 24th, 2017

Emory University has received a $1.2 million grant for an open access humanities publishing program.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Emory College of Arts and Sciences has launched a $1.2 million effort that positions it to be a national leader in the future of scholarly publishing. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is funding the multiyear initiative to support long-form, open-access publications in the humanities in partnership with university presses. . . .

Led by the Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the endeavor will bring together efforts in Emory College, Emory Libraries, the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship.

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