Archive for the 'Scholarly Communication' Category

Global Digital Humanities Librarian at Ohio State University

Posted in Scholarly Communication on May 10th, 2017

Ohio State University is recruiting a Global Digital Humanities Librarian (two-year residency).

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

As a member of the Research Services and Area Studies teams, the Resident will connect faculty and students in international and area studies departments with the Libraries’ growing digital humanities services through the Research Commons. The Resident will work collaboratively with colleagues across the Libraries to support this academic community throughout the research lifecycle from content generation/acquisition to data curation.

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"A Century of Science: Globalization of Scientific Collaborations, Citations, and Innovations"

Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics on April 22nd, 2017

Yuxiao Dong, Hao Ma, Zhihong Shen, and Kuansan Wang have self-archived "A Century of Science: Globalization of Scientific Collaborations, Citations, and Innovations."

Here's an excerpt:

In this work, we study the evolution of scientific development over the past century by presenting an anatomy of 89 million digitalized papers published between 1900 and 2015. We find that science has benefited from the shift from individual work to collaborative effort, with over 90% of the world-leading innovations generated by collaborations in this century, nearly four times higher than they were in the 1900s. We discover that rather than the frequent myopic- and self-referencing that was common in the early 20th century, modern scientists instead tend to look for literature further back and farther around. Finally, we also observe the globalization of scientific development from 1900 to 2015, including 25-fold and 7-fold increases in international collaborations and citations, respectively, as well as a dramatic decline in the dominant accumulation of citations by the US, the UK, and Germany, from 95% to 50% over the same period.

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"Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Institutional Repositories, Open Access, Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on February 9th, 2017

Clifford Lynch has published "Updating the Agenda for Academic Libraries and Scholarly Communications" in College & Research Libraries.

Here's an excerpt:

This issue of C&RL is focused on scholarly communication, and it seems appropriate, in this invited guest editorial, to step back and examine the broader agenda that academic and research libraries need to consider today in engaging with scholarly communications as a way of framing the issue. My view is that this agenda is ripe for re-thinking. The overall environment has changed significantly in the last few years, underscoring the growing irrelevance of some long-held ideas, and at the same time, clearly identifying new and urgent priorities. What I hope to do here is to summarize very succinctly my thoughts on the most pressing issues and the areas most needing reconsideration. Articles in this issue touch upon aspects of many of these topics; I hope that future authors may also find topical inspirations here.

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"Supporting Scholarly Communication: Considerations for Library Leadership"

Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Communication on September 6th, 2016

Irene M. H. Herold has published "Supporting Scholarly Communication: Considerations for Library Leadership" in College & Research Libraries News.

Here's an excerpt:

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Starting from the question of what library leaders can do, I approach the topic of supporting scholarly communication from three perspectives: mentorship, effective partnerships, and the leadership role. I reviewed past columns from a leadership perspective. I also asked some of my "thought leader" colleagues what they saw as important trends and considerations.

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"Scholarly Use of Social Media and Altmetrics: A Review of the Literature"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 31st, 2016

Cassidy R. Sugimoto et al. have self-archived "Scholarly Use of Social Media and Altmetrics: A Review of the Literature."

Here's an excerpt:

This review provides an extensive account of the state-of-the art in both scholarly use of social media and altmetrics. The review consists of two main parts: the first examines the use of social media in academia, examining the various functions these platforms have in the scholarly communication process and the factors that affect this use. The second part reviews empirical studies of altmetrics, discussing the various interpretations of altmetrics, data collection and methodological limitations, and differences according to platform. The review ends with a critical discussion of the implications of this transformation in the scholarly communication system.

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"What Motivates Authors of Scholarly Articles? The Importance of Journal Attributes and Potential Audience on Publication Choice"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on July 19th, 2016

Carol Tenopir et al. have published "What Motivates Authors of Scholarly Articles? The Importance of Journal Attributes and Potential Audience on Publication Choice" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

In this article we examine what motivations influence academic authors in selecting a journal in which to publish. A survey was sent to approximately 15,000 faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers at four large North American research universities with a response rate of 14.4% (n = 2021). Respondents were asked to rate how eight different journal attributes and five different audiences influence their choice of publication output. Within the sample, the most highly rated attributes are quality and reputation of journal and fit with the scope of the journal; open access is the least important attribute. Researchers at other research-intensive institutions are considered the most important audience, while the general public is the least important. There are significant differences across subject disciplines and position types. Our findings have implications for understanding the adoption of open access publishing models.

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"A Two-Sided Academic Landscape: Portrait of Highly-Cited Documents in Google Scholar (1950-2013)"

Posted in Google and Other Search Engines, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Metrics on July 13th, 2016

Alberto Martin-Martin et al. have self-archived "A Two-Sided Academic Landscape: Portrait of Highly-Cited Documents in Google Scholar (1950-2013)."

Here's an excerpt:

Since the existence of a full-text link does not guarantee the disposal of the full-text (some links actually refer to publisher's abstracts), the results (40% of the documents had a free full-text link) might be somewhat overestimated. In any case, these values are consistent with those published by Archambault et al. (2013), who found that over 40% of the articles from their sample were freely accessible; higher than those by Khabsa and Giles (2014) and Björk et al. (2010), who found only a 24% and 20.4% of open access documents respectively; and much lower than Jamali and Nabavi (2015) and Pitol and De Groote (2014), who found 61.1% and 70% respectively.

The different nature of the samples makes it difficult to draw comparisons among these studies. Nonetheless, the sample used in this study (64,000 documents) is the largest ever used to date.

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All PLoS Journals Added to Directory of Open Access Journals

Posted in Scholarly Communication on June 20th, 2016

The Directory of Open Access Journals now includes all PLoS Journals.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Finally, after saying: "It's coming" for almost a year, DOAJ has added the entire PLoS catalogue to DOAJ. A total of 182,500 articles were added and the harvester is set to go out and collect new articles at 5.30am every morning. The harvester collects the metadata from Europe PMC.

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UK Survey of Academics 2015

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, ERM/Discovery Systems, Scholarly Communication on June 16th, 2016

Ithaka S+R has released UK Survey of Academics 2015.

Here's an excerpt:

This report is the second Ithaka S+R / Jisc / RLUK survey of UK academics. It asks of the UK research community their views on resource discovery, their use of these resources (online and digital), attitudes to research data management, and much more. It provides a powerful insight into how researchers view their own behaviour and the research environment within the UK today.

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National Digital Stewardship Residents (Five)

Posted in Scholarly Communication on June 9th, 2016

The Library of Congress and the Institute of Museum and Library Services are recruiting five National Digital Stewardship Residents.

Here's an excerpt from the ad:

The National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) is a collaborative field experience program developed by The Library of Congress and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This will be the third cohort of residents based in Washington, D.C. The program aims to develop a community of professionals in the dynamic field of digital stewardship.

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"Science and Technology Librarians: User Engagement and Outreach Activities in the Area of Scholarly Communication"

Posted in Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on April 8th, 2016

Lutishoor Salisbury and Julie Speer have published "Science and Technology Librarians: User Engagement and Outreach Activities in the Area of Scholarly Communication" in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper highlights the findings of a survey completed by ACRL/STS members on scholarly communication issues. In particular it identifies the percentage of their daily activities that are spent in support of scholarly communication activities; extent of change of job responsibilities in the last five years; roles engaged in relating to scholarly communication including those that are formal responsibilities, those they are informally engaged in, or those with which they have no engagement. It highlights areas in the area of scholarly communication that STS members need to know more about or want to know more about. It presents the status of open access policies at members' institutions and the needs expressed by members about activities that STS or ACRL could undertake to help advance their work in the areas of scholarly communication.

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Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2015

Posted in ERM/Discovery Systems, Publishing, Reports and White Papers, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on April 5th, 2016

Ithaka S+R has released the Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2015 .

Here's an excerpt:

Ithaka S+R's survey of US faculty members has been fielded regularly since 2000. This project provides a periodic snapshot of practices and perceptions related to scholarly communications and information usage. The scholar-centric nature of the questionnaire ensures that potential changes in research and teaching inform our thinking, not only about academic libraries and scholarly publishing, but about changes in the educational enterprise more broadly.

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