Archive for the 'Scholarly Communication' Category

"Scholarly Social Media Profiles and Libraries: A Review"

Posted in Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Metrics, Social Media/Web 2.0 on May 11th, 2015

Judit Ward et al. have published "Scholarly Social Media Profiles and Libraries: A Review" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This article aims to point out emerging roles and responsibilities for academic librarians with the potential of better integrating the library in the research process. In order to find out how to enhance the online reputation and discoverability of individual faculty members as well as their affiliated institutions, the authors worked side-by-side with researchers in the United States and Europe to explore, create, revise, and disambiguate scholarly profiles in various software applications. In an attempt to understand and organize scholarly social media, including new, alternative metrics, the authors reviewed and classified the major academic profile platforms, highlighting the overlapping elements, benefits, and drawbacks inherent in each. The consensus is that it would be time-consuming to keep one's profile current and accurate on all of these platforms, given the plethora of underlying problems, also discussed in detail in the article. However, it came as a startling discovery that reluctance to engage with scholarly social media may cause a misrepresentation of a researcher's academic achievements and may come with unforeseen consequences. The authors claim that current skills and competencies can secure an essential role for academic librarians in the research workflow by means of monitoring and navigating researcher profiles in scholarly social media in order to best represent the scholarship of their host institutions.

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    "Thumbs Down for the Freemium Model? Researchers Reject Nature’s Fast Track Peer Review Experiment"

    Posted in Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on May 6th, 2015

    David Crotty has published "Thumbs Down for the Freemium Model? Researchers Reject Nature's Fast Track Peer Review Experiment" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

    Here's an excerpt:

    NPG launched a four-week trial in their megajournal Scientific Reports. The journal features a Gold open access (OA) business model, where accepted authors pay a $1,495 article processing charge (APC). In the trial, authors willing to pay an additional $750 upfront would get their decision in three weeks. NPG would be able to offer this additional speed by outsourcing the peer review process to Rubriq, a service offered by the private company Research Square.

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      DigitalKoans Marks Its Tenth Year of Publication

      Posted in Digital Scholarship Publications, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Books, Scholarly Communication on April 20th, 2015

      DigitalKoans, which was established by Charles W. Bailey, Jr. on April 20, 2005, has now been published for ten years. During that time, it has had over 11.1 million visitors, over 50.8 million file requests, and over 36.8 million page views. Excluding spiders, there have been over 6.8 million visitors, over 49.7 million file requests, and over 17 million page views. There have been over 7,100 DigitalKoans posts.

      DigitalKoans was the first publication of Digital Scholarship, a digital press that was founded by Bailey on the same date. In its ten years of operation, Digital Scholarship has had over 14.9 million visitors from 231 counties, over 72 million file requests, and over 52 million page views. Excluding spiders, there have been over 9 million visitors from 231 counties, 43.4 million file requests, and over 24.1 million page views.

      Digital Scholarship has primarily published e-books, low-cost paperbacks, digital bibliographies/webliograpies, and blogs. The publications have been under Creative Commons licenses, usually versions of the Attribution-NonCommercial license. The digital publications have been open access. Digital Scholarship has operated without advertising revenue or other external funding.

      One of the most popular e-books published by Digital Scholarship has been Transforming Scholarly Publishing through Open Access: A Bibliography. Excluding spiders, the PDF version has been requested over 475,000 times; with the addition of page views from the HTML version, total use is over 539,000 requests.

      Prior to establishing Digital Scholarship, Bailey worked at the University of Houston Libraries, where he led the digital publishing program from 1989-2007 as Assistant Dean/Director for Systems and subsequently Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development. He established and acted as the first Editor-in-Chief of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review (1989-1996), the first open access journal in the field of library and information science. In 1996, he established the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, an open access e-book that had 79 subsequent versions (16 of which were published by Digital Scholarship). These two publications had over 9 million file requests while under Bailey's direction at the UH Libraries.

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        "Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship—An Interview with Robin Champieux and Jill Emery about This New Conference"

        Posted in Publishing, Research Libraries, Scholarly Communication on March 12th, 2015

        Alice Meadows has published "Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship—An Interview with Robin Champieux and Jill Emery about This New Conference" in The Scholarly Kitchen.

        Here's an excerpt:

        ARCS, Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship, is a new conference designed to provide a broad and collaborative forum for addressing and affecting scholarly and scientific communication. As organizers, we are working from the idea that supporting and improving knowledge communication in the digital age necessitates conversations and partnerships across communities, disciplines, and expertise. . . . Partnering with an organizing committee of librarians, technologists, humanists, scientists, and publishers we have built a conference program that addresses scholarly communication issues across the research cycle, through a diversity of stakeholder perspectives.

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          DigitalKoans Posts Resume on 2/23/2015

          Posted in Scholarly Communication on February 16th, 2015

          DigitalKoans posts will resume on 2/23/2015.

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            "Tenets of the Liberal Arts: Complex Thinking in the Digital Age"

            Posted in Scholarly Communication on November 18th, 2014

            Charles J. Henry and Elliott Shore have published "Tenets of the Liberal Arts: Complex Thinking in the Digital Age" in EDUCAUSE Review.

            Here's an excerpt:

            We are awash in millions of books and journals, with a high degree of redundancy across academic institutions. Perhaps justified in the non-digital environment that reaches back to Babylon, this expensive, competitive circumstance is indefensible in a digital ecology. In addition to the vast array of printed matter, we continue to proliferate projects that create digital content but that are often siloed and uncommunicative. Further, we pay exorbitant fees to lease content from providers, buying back the knowledge we essentially gave away to them in the first place. In this respect, the migration from our print-based traditions of discovery, publishing, access, and preservation to digital-based methods is indeed under way. But the process is so uncoordinated and ad hoc that our current hybrid library retains most of the costs, inefficiencies, and impediments of the older paradigm.

            Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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              "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites"

              Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication, Scholarly Journals on November 10th, 2014

              Andy Tattersall has published "Comment, Discuss, Review: An Essential Guide to Post-Publication Review Sites" in LSE Impact of Social Sciences.

              Here's an excerpt:

              The debate on whether which is the best way forward for post-publication review will continue and like other topics such as measurement of research, there appears to be no 'silver bullet'. Instead there is a collection of sites and tools operating in silos, all offering to solve a problem, that being the lack of post publication discussion and assessment. Below are a list of some of the main tools and sites offering some kind of comment, discussion or review system—it is not exhaustive or comprehensive, but it will give you some idea as to what they are and do.

              Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                ACRL Releases New Version of Scholarly Communication Toolkit

                Posted in Open Access, Scholarly Communication on September 25th, 2014

                ACRL has released New Version of the Scholarly Communication Toolkit.

                Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                The Toolkit, developed and maintained by the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee, continues to provide content and context on a broad range of scholarly communication topics, including expanded information on data management. It provides links to examples of specific tools, including handouts, presentations, and videos for libraries to use on their own campuses, and for library school students seeking to incorporate these issues into their course work.

                Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                  Digital Infrastructure Librarian at Washington University

                  Posted in Digital Library Jobs, Scholarly Communication on August 19th, 2014

                  Washington University is recruiting a Digital Infrastructure Librarian.

                  Here's an excerpt from the ad:

                  Washington University Libraries is seeking a creative and enthusiastic individual to design and implement a new digital library application infrastructure using the Hydra repository framework and related technologies. Reporting to the Head of Scholarly Publishing, the Digital Infrastructure Librarian will work collaboratively with Libraries' staff and campus partners to lead all aspects of system design and implementation, including gathering requirements, establishing coding standards, and participating in system testing, resulting in the delivery of a functioning digital asset management system based on the Hydra repository framework. This position will participate in writing text and project plans that will be incorporated into grant submissions.

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                    "Online Collaboration: Scientists and the Social Network"

                    Posted in Scholarly Communication, Social Media/Web 2.0 on August 18th, 2014

                    Richard Van Noorde has published "Online Collaboration: Scientists and the Social Network" in Nature.

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    More than 4.5 million researchers have signed up for ResearchGate, and another 10,000 arrive every day, says Madisch. That is a pittance compared with Facebook's 1.3 billion active users, but astonishing for a network that only researchers can join.

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                      "Estimates of the Continuously Publishing Core in the Scientific Workforce"

                      Posted in Publishing, Scholarly Communication on July 15th, 2014

                      John P. A. Ioannidis et al. have published "Estimates of the Continuously Publishing Core in the Scientific Workforce" in PLOS ONE.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      The proportion of the scientific workforce that maintains a continuous uninterrupted stream of publications each and every year over many years is very limited, but it accounts for the lion's share of researchers with high citation impact. This finding may have implications for the structure, stability and vulnerability of the scientific workforce.

                      Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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                        VIVO 1.7 Released

                        Posted in Open Source Software, Scholarly Communication on July 3rd, 2014

                        The VIVO Project has released VIVO 1.7.

                        Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

                        The VIVO 1.7 release combines new features with improvements to existing features and services and continues to leverage the VIVO-Integrated Semantic Framework (VIVO-ISF) ontology introduced in VIVO 1.6. No data migration or changes to local data ingest procedures, visualization, or analysis tools drawing directly on VIVO data will be required to upgrade to VIVO 1.7.

                        VIVO 1.7 notably includes the results of an ORCID Adoption and Integration Grant to support the creation and verification of ORCID iDs. VIVO now offers the opportunity for a researcher to add and/or confirm his or her global, unique researcher identifier directly with ORCID without the necessity of applying through other channels and re-typing the 16-digit ORCID identifier.

                        What is VIVO?

                        VIVO is an open source semantic web application originally developed and implemented at Cornell. When installed and populated with researcher interests, activities, and accomplishments, it enables the discovery of research and scholarship across disciplines at that institution and beyond. VIVO supports browsing and a search function which returns faceted results for rapid retrieval of desired information. Content in any local VIVO installation may be maintained manually, brought into VIVO in automated ways from local systems of record, such as HR, grants, course, and faculty activity databases, or from database providers such as publication aggregators and funding agencies.

                        Digital Scholarship | "A Quarter-Century as an Open Access Publisher"

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