Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

"Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on June 9th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Maxim Grechkin, Hoifung Poon, and Bill Howe have published "Wide-Open: Accelerating Public Data Release by Automating Detection of Overdue Datasets" in PLOS Biology.

Here's an excerpt:

Open data is a vital pillar of open science and a key enabler for reproducibility, data reuse, and novel discoveries. Enforcement of open-data policies, however, largely relies on manual efforts, which invariably lag behind the increasingly automated generation of biological data. To address this problem, we developed a general approach to automatically identify datasets overdue for public release by applying text mining to identify dataset references in published articles and parse query results from repositories to determine if the datasets remain private. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on 2 popular National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) repositories: Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Our Wide-Open system identified a large number of overdue datasets, which spurred administrators to respond directly by releasing 400 datasets in one week.

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"Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on June 8th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Darren B. Taichman et al. have published "Data Sharing Statements for Clinical Trials—A Requirement of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors" in PLOS Medicine.

Here's an excerpt:

Therefore, ICMJE will require the following as conditions of consideration for publication of a clinical trial report in our member journals:

  1. As of July 1, 2018 manuscripts submitted to ICMJE journals that report the results of clinical trials must contain a data sharing statement as described below.
  2. Clinical trials that begin enrolling participants on or after January 1, 2019 must include a data sharing plan in the trial’s registration. The ICMJE's policy regarding trial registration is explained at www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/clinical-trial-registration.html. If the data sharing plan changes after registration this should be reflected in the statement submitted and published with the manuscript, and updated in the registry record.

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"A Trust Framework for Online Research Data Services"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories on June 5th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Malcolm Wolski, Louise Howard, and Joanna Richardson have published "A Trust Framework for Online Research Data Services" in Publications.

Here's an excerpt:

There is worldwide interest in the potential of open science to increase the quality, impact, and benefits of science and research. More recently, attention has been focused on aspects such as transparency, quality, and provenance, particularly in regard to data. For industry, citizens, and other researchers to participate in the open science agenda, further work needs to be undertaken to establish trust in research environments. Based on a critical review of the literature, this paper examines the issue of trust in an open science environment, using virtual laboratories as the focus for discussion. A trust framework, which has been developed from an end-user perspective, is proposed as a model for addressing relevant issues within online research data services and tools.

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An Analysis of Open Data and Open Science Policies in Europe, May 2017

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Legislation and Government Regulation, Open Access, Open Science on June 2nd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

SPARC Europe has released An Analysis of Open Data and Open Science Policies in Europe, May 2017 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Among the report’s most striking findings: 11 of the 28 European Union member states, as well as Norway and Switzerland, have national, research data-related policies in place. Of these, all were implemented in the past eight years, with most having taken effect recently. In about half of the countries, research data is covered under the same policy that applies to Open Access or Open Science.

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"Research Data Management in Academic Institutions: A Scoping Review"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 24th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Laure Perrier et al. have published "Research Data Management in Academic Institutions: A Scoping Review" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

Interest in research data management in the global community is on the rise. Recent activity has included the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation moving their open access/open data policy, considered to be exceptionally strong, into force at the beginning of 2017 [10]. Researchers working towards a solution to the Zika virus organized themselves to publish all epidemiological and clinical data as soon as it was gathered and analyzed [11]. Fecher and colleagues [12] conducted a systematic review focusing on data sharing to support the development of a conceptual framework, however it lacked rigorous methods, such as the use of a comprehensive search strategy [13]. Another review on data sharing was conducted by Bull and colleagues [14] that examined stakeholders' perspectives on ethical best practices but focused specifically on low- and middle-income settings. In this scoping review, we aim to assess the research literature that examines research data management as it relates to academic institutions. It is a time of increasing activity in the area of research data management [15] and higher learning institutions need to be ready to address this change, as well as provide support for their faculty and researchers. Identifying the current state of the literature so there is a clear understanding of the evidence in the area will provide guidance in planning strategies for services and support, as well as outlining essential areas for future research endeavors in research data management. The purpose of this study is to describe the volume, topics, and methodological nature of the existing research literature on research data management in academic institutions.

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"GI+100: Long Term Preservation of Digital Geographic Information—16 Fundamental Principles Agreed by National Mapping Agencies and State Archives"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 23rd, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Carsten Rönsdorf et al. have published "GI+100: Long Term Preservation of Digital Geographic Information—16 Fundamental Principles Agreed by National Mapping Agencies and State Archives" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper states 16 principles for the long term retention and preservation of digital geographic information. The paper is mainly aimed at public sector geographic information providers in Europe (particularly those involved in mapping and cadastre) with the intention of highlighting the significance of fundamental concepts for digital geographic data archiving. Geographic information providers include mapping agencies and archives that preserve geographic data among a wider range of digital information. A supplementary objective is that the paper may provide useful information for providers of all types of geographic information right around the world.

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"Managing Data Management: Building a RDM Service at MIT Libraries"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

The 2017 e-Science Symposium has released Managing Data Management: Building a RDM Service at MIT Libraries, a video of a presentation by Christine Malinowski and Phoebe Ayers.

Here's an excerpt:

In this presentation, we will provide an overview of how the MIT Libraries DMS team works, some examples of our recent projects and consultations, our specific (but certainly generalizable) challenges of providing and expanding RDM services, and the tools that we use to meet those challenges and ensure speedy and accurate service. These include a wiki-based knowledgebase, dynamic project plans using Tableau software, a rotating on-call list, and biweekly RDM updates emails.

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"Social Science Data Repositories in Data Deluge: A Case Study at ICPSR Workflow and Practices"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 17th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Wei Jeng et al. have self-archived "Social Science Data Repositories in Data Deluge: A Case Study at ICPSR Workflow and Practices."

Here's an excerpt:

Due to the recent surge of interest in the age of the data deluge, the importance of researching data infrastructures is increasing. The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) model has been widely adopted as a framework for creating and maintaining digital repositories. Considering that OAIS is a reference model that requires customization for actual practice, this study examines how the current practices in a data repository map to the OAIS environment and functional components.

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Data Curation, SPEC Kit 354

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 15th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

ARL has released the Data Curation, SPEC Kit 354 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This SPEC Kit covers which data curation services are offered, who may use them, which disciplines use services most, library staffing levels, policies and workflows, and the challenges of supporting these activities.

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"Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Meg Byrne has published "Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE" in the EveryONE Blog

Here's an excerpt:

PLOS ONE has published over 65,000 papers with a DAS in the three years since the open data policy was put in place. We were initially concerned we would not be able to consider a significant number of submissions because authors could not share data, but this did not turn out to be the case. Since the implementation of the updated policy, we estimate staff have rejected less than 0.1% of submissions due to authors’ unwillingness or inability to share data. What we have seen is a growing acceptance of data sharing and evolution of data sharing practices. For instance, there has been a steady growth in datasets available directly via public data repositories such as the NCBI databases, Figshare or Dryad. While the proportion of articles with a data availability statement linking to one of these repositories is still relatively low, at around 20% in 2016, the growth is encouraging.

Another 60% of articles include data in the main text and supplementary information. While we strongly recommend discipline-specific open repositories where they exist, we also deposit the supporting information files, figures, and tables included with every article to Figshare and give each of these its own DOI. Thus, in addition to being available via the PLOS ONE article, this content is also available through an external data repository. The remaining 20% of papers have data available upon request due to restrictions acceptable under our policy, including restrictions related to sensitive data or because the data are owned by and available from a third party.

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"The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author’s Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 20th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

David Giofrè et al. have published "The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author's Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

From January 2014, Psychological Science introduced new submission guidelines that encouraged the use of effect sizes, estimation, and meta-analysis (the "new statistics"), required extra detail of methods, and offered badges for use of open science practices. We investigated the use of these practices in empirical articles published by Psychological Science and, for comparison, by the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, during the period of January 2013 to December 2015. The use of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) was extremely high at all times and in both journals. In Psychological Science, the use of confidence intervals increased markedly overall, from 28% of articles in 2013 to 70% in 2015, as did the availability of open data (3 to 39%) and open materials (7 to 31%). The other journal showed smaller or much smaller changes. Our findings suggest that journal-specific submission guidelines may encourage desirable changes in authors’ practices.

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"Perseids: Experimenting with Infrastructure for Creating and Sharing Research Data in the Digital Humanities"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities on April 19th, 2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Bridget Almas has published "Perseids: Experimenting with Infrastructure for Creating and Sharing Research Data in the Digital Humanities" in the Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The Perseids project provides a platform for creating, publishing, and sharing research data, in the form of textual transcriptions, annotations and analyses. An offshoot and collaborator of the Perseus Digital Library (PDL), Perseids is also an experiment in reusing and extending existing infrastructure, tools, and services. This paper discusses infrastructure in the domain of digital humanities (DH). It outlines some general approaches to facilitating data sharing in this domain, and the specific choices we made in developing Perseids to serve that goal. It concludes by identifying lessons we have learned about sustainability in the process of building Perseids, noting some critical gaps in infrastructure for the digital humanities, and suggesting some implications for the wider community.

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