Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

"Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 4th, 2015

The Data Citation Synthesis Working Group has released the "Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles."

Here's an excerpt:

The Data Citation Principles cover purpose, function and attributes of citations. These principles recognize the dual necessity of creating citation practices that are both human understandable and machine-actionable.

See also "An Introduction to the Joint Principles for Data Citation."

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    "A Reputation Economy: Results from an Empirical Survey on Academic Data Sharing"

    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 4th, 2015

    Benedikt Fecher et al. have self-archived "A Reputation Economy: Results from an Empirical Survey on Academic Data Sharing."

    Here's an excerpt:

    We surveyed 2661 individual academic researchers across all disciplines on their dealings with data, their publication practices, and motives for sharing or withholding research data. The results for 1564 valid responses show that researchers across disciplines recognise the benefit of secondary research data for their own work and for scientific progress as a whole-still they only practice it in moderation. An explanation for this evidence could be an academic system that is not driven by monetary incentives, nor the desire for scientific progress, but by individual reputation-expressed in (high ranked journal) publications. We label this system a Reputation Economy. This special economy explains our findings that show that researchers have a nuanced idea how to provide adequate formal recognition for making data available to others-namely data citations. We conclude that data sharing will only be widely adopted among research professionals if sharing pays in form of reputation. Thus, policy measures that intend to foster research collaboration need to understand academia as a reputation economy. Successful measures must value intermediate products, such as research data, more highly than it is the case now.

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      "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing"

      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 2nd, 2015

      Michael J. Ackerman has published "The Educational Value of Truly Interactive Science Publishing" in The Journal of Electronic Publishing.

      Here's an excerpt:

      Interactive Scientific Publishing (ISP) has been developed by the Optical Society of America with support from the National Library of Medicine at NIH. It allows authors to electronically publish papers which are linked to the referenced 2D and 3D original image datasets. These image datasets can then be viewed and analyzed interactively by the reader. ISP provides the software for authors to assemble and link their source data to their publication. But more important is that it provides readers with image viewing and analysis tools. The goal of ISP is to improve learning and understanding of the presented information. This paper describes ISP and its effect on learning and understanding. ISP was shown to have enough educational value that readers were willing to invest in the required set-up and learning phases. The social aspects of data sharing and the enlarged review process may be the hardest obstacles to overcome.

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        Data on the Web Best Practices

        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on February 26th, 2015

        W3C has released a draft of Data on the Web Best Practices.

        Here's an excerpt:

        This document provides best practices related to the publication and usage of data on the Web designed to help support a self-sustaining ecosystem. Data should be discoverable and understandable by humans and machines. Where data is used in some way, whether by the originator of the data or by an external party, such usage should also be discoverable and the efforts of the data publisher recognized. In short, following these best practices will facilitate interaction between publishers and consumers.

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          "Researcher Perspectives on Publication and Peer Review of Data"

          Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on February 26th, 2015

          John Ernest Kratz and Carly Strasser have published "Researcher Perspectives on Publication and Peer Review of Data" in PLOS ONE.

          Here's an excerpt:

          Data "publication" seeks to appropriate the prestige of authorship in the peer-reviewed literature to reward researchers who create useful and well-documented datasets. The scholarly communication community has embraced data publication as an incentive to document and share data. But, numerous new and ongoing experiments in implementation have not yet resolved what a data publication should be, when data should be peer-reviewed, or how data peer review should work. While researchers have been surveyed extensively regarding data management and sharing, their perceptions and expectations of data publication are largely unknown. To bring this important yet neglected perspective into the conversation, we surveyed ~ 250 researchers across the sciences and social sciences—asking what expectations "data publication" raises and what features would be useful to evaluate the trustworthiness, evaluate the impact, and enhance the prestige of a data publication. We found that researcher expectations of data publication center on availability, generally through an open database or repository. Few respondents expected published data to be peer-reviewed, but peer-reviewed data enjoyed much greater trust and prestige. The importance of adequate metadata was acknowledged, in that almost all respondents expected data peer review to include evaluation of the data's documentation. Formal citation in the reference list was affirmed by most respondents as the proper way to credit dataset creators. Citation count was viewed as the most useful measure of impact, but download count was seen as nearly as valuable. These results offer practical guidance for data publishers seeking to meet researcher expectations and enhance the value of published data.

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            "Digital Curation and Doctoral Research"

            Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on February 25th, 2015

            Daisy Abbott has published "Digital Curation and Doctoral Research" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

            Here's an excerpt:

            This article considers digital curation in doctoral study and the role of the doctoral supervisor and institution in facilitating students' acquisition of digital curation skills, including some of the potentially problematic expectations of the supervisory relationship with regards to digital curation. Research took the form of an analysis of the current digital curation training landscape, focusing on doctoral study and supervision. This was followed by a survey (n=116) investigating attitudes towards importance, expertise, and responsibilities regarding digital curation. This research confirms that digital curation is considered to be very important within doctoral study but that doctoral supervisors and particularly students consider themselves to be largely unskilled at curation tasks. It provides a detailed picture of curation activity within doctoral study and identifies the areas of most concern. A detailed analysis demonstrates that most of the responsibility for curation is thought to lie with students and that institutions are perceived to have very low responsibility and that individuals tend to over-assign responsibility to themselves. Finally, the research identifies which types of support system for curation are most used and makes suggestions for ways in which students, supervisors, institutions, and others can effectively and efficiently address problematic areas and improve digital curation within doctoral study.

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              "What Factors Influence Where Researchers Deposit their Data? A Survey of Researchers Submitting to Data Repositories"

              Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Repositories, Self-Archiving on February 25th, 2015

              Shea Swauger and Todd J. Vision have published "What Factors Influence Where Researchers Deposit their Data? A Survey of Researchers Submitting to Data Repositories" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

              Here's an excerpt:

              In order to better understand the factors that most influence where researchers deposit their data when they have a choice, we collected survey data from researchers who deposited phylogenetic data in either the TreeBASE or Dryad data repositories. Respondents were asked to rank the relative importance of eight possible factors. We found that factors differed in importance for both TreeBASE and Dryad, and that the rankings differed subtly but significantly between TreeBASE and Dryad users. On average, TreeBASE users ranked the domain specialization of the repository highest, while Dryad users ranked as equal highest their trust in the persistence of the repository and the ease of its data submission process. Interestingly, respondents (particularly Dryad users) were strongly divided as to whether being directed to choose a particular repository by a journal policy or funding agency was among the most or least important factors. Some users reported depositing their data in multiple repositories and archiving their data voluntarily.

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                ERCIM News Special Issue on Scientific Data Sharing and Re-use

                Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on February 12th, 2015

                ERCIM has released a special issue of ERCIM News on scientific data sharing and re-use.

                Here's an excerpt from "Introduction to the Special Theme Scientific Data Sharing and Re-use":

                This special issue features a keynote paper from an EU funding organization, an invited paper from a global organization that aims to accelerate and facilitate research data sharing and exchange, an invited paper from a prominent US scientist and an invited paper from a large Australian data organization. The core part of this issue presents several contributions of European researchers that address the different aspects of the data sharing and (re)use problem.

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                  "Starting a Research Data Management Program Based in a University Library"

                  Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on January 30th, 2015

                  Margaret Henderson and Teresa L. Knott have self-archived "Starting a Research Data Management Program Based in a University Library."

                  Here's an excerpt:

                  As the need for research data management grows, many libraries are considering adding data services to help with the research mission of their institution. The Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Libraries created a position and hired a director of research data management in September 2013. The position was new to the libraries and the university. With the backing of the library administration, a plan for building relationships with VCU faculty, researchers, students, service and resource providers, including grant administrators, was developed to educate and engage the community in data management plan writing and research data management training.

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                    "Analyzing Data Citation Practices According to the Data Citation Index"

                    Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on January 27th, 2015

                    Nicolas Robinson-Garcia et al. have self-archived "Analyzing Data Citation Practices According to the Data Citation Index."

                    Here's an excerpt:

                    The findings of this study show that data citation practices are far from common in most research fields. Some differences have been reported on the way researchers cite data: while in the areas of Science and Engineering and Technology data sets were the most cited, in Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities data studies play a greater role. 88.1 percent of the records have received no citations, but some repositories show very low uncitedness rates. While data citation practices are rare in most fields, they have expanded in disciplines such as Crystallography or Genomics. We conclude by emphasizing the role that the DCI could play in encouraging the consistent, standardized citation of research data—a role that would enhance its value as a means of following the research process from data collection to publication.

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                      "Digital Forensics on A Shoestring: A Case Study from the University of Victoria"

                      Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on January 22nd, 2015

                      John Durno and Jerry Trofimchuk have published "Digital Forensics on A Shoestring: A Case Study from the University of Victoria" in Code4Lib Journal.

                      Here's an excerpt:

                      While much has been written on the increasing importance of digital forensics in archival workflows, most of the literature focuses on theoretical issues or establishing best practices in the abstract. Where case studies exist, most have been written from the perspective of larger organizations with well-resourced digital forensics facilities. However organizations of any size are increasingly likely to receive donations of born-digital material on outdated media, and a need exists for more modest solutions to the problem of acquiring and preserving their contents. This case study outlines the development of a small-scale digital forensics program at the University of Victoria using inexpensive components and open source software, funded by a $2000 research grant from the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL).

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                        Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data

                        Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Reports and White Papers on January 20th, 2015

                        The RECODE project has released Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data.

                        Here's an excerpt:

                        These policy recommendations are targeted at key stakeholders in the scholarly communication ecosystem, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. They will assist each of the stakeholders in furthering the goals of open access to research data by providing both over-arching and stakeholder-specific recommendations. These function, as suggestions to address and attend to central issues that RECODE identified through the research work.

                        The current report thus comprises:

                        • summary of project findings
                        • overarching recommendations
                        • targeted policy recommendations for funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers
                        • practical guides for developing policies for funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers
                        • resources to expedite the process of policy development and implementation among stakeholders

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