Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

"GI+100: Long Term Preservation of Digital Geographic Information—16 Fundamental Principles Agreed by National Mapping Agencies and State Archives"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on May 23rd, 2017

Carsten Rönsdorf et al. have published "GI+100: Long Term Preservation of Digital Geographic Information—16 Fundamental Principles Agreed by National Mapping Agencies and State Archives" in the International Journal of Digital Curation.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper states 16 principles for the long term retention and preservation of digital geographic information. The paper is mainly aimed at public sector geographic information providers in Europe (particularly those involved in mapping and cadastre) with the intention of highlighting the significance of fundamental concepts for digital geographic data archiving. Geographic information providers include mapping agencies and archives that preserve geographic data among a wider range of digital information. A supplementary objective is that the paper may provide useful information for providers of all types of geographic information right around the world.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Managing Data Management: Building a RDM Service at MIT Libraries"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 17th, 2017

The 2017 e-Science Symposium has released Managing Data Management: Building a RDM Service at MIT Libraries, a video of a presentation by Christine Malinowski and Phoebe Ayers.

Here's an excerpt:

In this presentation, we will provide an overview of how the MIT Libraries DMS team works, some examples of our recent projects and consultations, our specific (but certainly generalizable) challenges of providing and expanding RDM services, and the tools that we use to meet those challenges and ensure speedy and accurate service. These include a wiki-based knowledgebase, dynamic project plans using Tableau software, a rotating on-call list, and biweekly RDM updates emails.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Social Science Data Repositories in Data Deluge: A Case Study at ICPSR Workflow and Practices"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 17th, 2017

Wei Jeng et al. have self-archived "Social Science Data Repositories in Data Deluge: A Case Study at ICPSR Workflow and Practices."

Here's an excerpt:

Due to the recent surge of interest in the age of the data deluge, the importance of researching data infrastructures is increasing. The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) model has been widely adopted as a framework for creating and maintaining digital repositories. Considering that OAIS is a reference model that requires customization for actual practice, this study examines how the current practices in a data repository map to the OAIS environment and functional components.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Data Curation, SPEC Kit 354

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on May 15th, 2017

ARL has released the Data Curation, SPEC Kit 354 .

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

This SPEC Kit covers which data curation services are offered, who may use them, which disciplines use services most, library staffing levels, policies and workflows, and the challenges of supporting these activities.

Research Data Curation Bibliography, Version 7 | Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on May 11th, 2017

Meg Byrne has published "Making Progress Toward Open Data: Reflections on Data Sharing at PLOS ONE" in the EveryONE Blog

Here's an excerpt:

PLOS ONE has published over 65,000 papers with a DAS in the three years since the open data policy was put in place. We were initially concerned we would not be able to consider a significant number of submissions because authors could not share data, but this did not turn out to be the case. Since the implementation of the updated policy, we estimate staff have rejected less than 0.1% of submissions due to authors’ unwillingness or inability to share data. What we have seen is a growing acceptance of data sharing and evolution of data sharing practices. For instance, there has been a steady growth in datasets available directly via public data repositories such as the NCBI databases, Figshare or Dryad. While the proportion of articles with a data availability statement linking to one of these repositories is still relatively low, at around 20% in 2016, the growth is encouraging.

Another 60% of articles include data in the main text and supplementary information. While we strongly recommend discipline-specific open repositories where they exist, we also deposit the supporting information files, figures, and tables included with every article to Figshare and give each of these its own DOI. Thus, in addition to being available via the PLOS ONE article, this content is also available through an external data repository. The remaining 20% of papers have data available upon request due to restrictions acceptable under our policy, including restrictions related to sensitive data or because the data are owned by and available from a third party.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author’s Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 20th, 2017

David Giofrè et al. have published "The Influence of Journal Submission Guidelines on Author's Reporting of Statistics and Use of Open Research Practices" in PLOS ONE.

Here's an excerpt:

From January 2014, Psychological Science introduced new submission guidelines that encouraged the use of effect sizes, estimation, and meta-analysis (the "new statistics"), required extra detail of methods, and offered badges for use of open science practices. We investigated the use of these practices in empirical articles published by Psychological Science and, for comparison, by the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, during the period of January 2013 to December 2015. The use of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) was extremely high at all times and in both journals. In Psychological Science, the use of confidence intervals increased markedly overall, from 28% of articles in 2013 to 70% in 2015, as did the availability of open data (3 to 39%) and open materials (7 to 31%). The other journal showed smaller or much smaller changes. Our findings suggest that journal-specific submission guidelines may encourage desirable changes in authors’ practices.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Perseids: Experimenting with Infrastructure for Creating and Sharing Research Data in the Digital Humanities"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities on April 19th, 2017

Bridget Almas has published "Perseids: Experimenting with Infrastructure for Creating and Sharing Research Data in the Digital Humanities" in the Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

The Perseids project provides a platform for creating, publishing, and sharing research data, in the form of textual transcriptions, annotations and analyses. An offshoot and collaborator of the Perseus Digital Library (PDL), Perseids is also an experiment in reusing and extending existing infrastructure, tools, and services. This paper discusses infrastructure in the domain of digital humanities (DH). It outlines some general approaches to facilitating data sharing in this domain, and the specific choices we made in developing Perseids to serve that goal. It concludes by identifying lessons we have learned about sustainability in the process of building Perseids, noting some critical gaps in infrastructure for the digital humanities, and suggesting some implications for the wider community.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Open Data, [Open] Access: Linking Data Sharing and Article Sharing in the Earth Sciences"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on April 12th, 2017

Samantha Teplitzky has published "Open Data, [Open] Access: Linking Data Sharing and Article Sharing in the Earth Science" in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.

Here's an excerpt:

INTRODUCTION The norms of a research community influence practice, and norms of openness and sharing can be shaped to encourage researchers who share in one aspect of their research cycle to share in another. Different sets of mandates have evolved to require that research data be made public, but not necessarily articles resulting from that collected data. In this paper, I ask to what extent publications in the Earth Sciences are more likely to be open access (in all of its definitions) when researchers open their data through the Pangaea repository. METHODS Citations from Pangaea data sets were studied to determine the level of open access for each article. RESULTS This study finds that the proportion of gold open access articles linked to the repository increased 25% from 2010 to 2015 and 75% of articles were available from multiple open sources.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"Organizational Resilience in Data Archives: Three Case Studies in Social Science Data Archives"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 10th, 2017

Kristin R. Eschenfelder and Kalpana Shankar have published "Organizational Resilience in Data Archives: Three Case Studies in Social Science Data Archives" in the Data Science Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

In this paper, we draw upon organizational studies theories to approach the issue of sustainability from an organizational perspective, focusing specifically on the organizational histories of three social science data archives (SSDA): ICPSR, UKDA, and LIS. Using a framework of organizational resilience to understand how archives perceive crisis, respond to it, and learn from experience, this article reports on an empirical study of sustainability in these long-lived SSDAs. The study draws from archival documents and interviews to examine how sustainability can and should be conceptualized as on-going processes over time and not as a quality at a single moment.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Open Data: The Researcher Perspective

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing on April 7th, 2017

Elsevier and the Centre for Science and Technology Studies have released Open Data: The Researcher Perspective .

Here's an excerpt:

Combining information from a bibliometric analysis, a survey and case studies, this report examines how researchers share data, the attitudes of researchers toward sharing data, and why researchers might be reticent to share data.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

"An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers’ Data Management Practices at UVM: Integrated Findings to Develop Research Data Services"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Research Libraries on April 5th, 2017

Elizabeth A. Berman has published "An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers' Data Management Practices at UVM: Integrated Findings to Develop Research Data Services" in the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

Here's an excerpt:

This article reports on the integrated findings of an exploratory sequential mixed methods research design aimed to understand data management behaviors and challenges of faculty at the University of Vermont (UVM) in order to develop relevant research data services. The exploratory sequential mixed methods design is characterized by an initial qualitative phase of data collection and analysis, followed by a phase of quantitative data collection and analysis, with a final phase of integration or linking of data from the two separate strands of data. A joint display was used to integrate data focused on the three primary research questions: How do faculty at UVM manage their research data, in particular how do they share and preserve data in the long-term?; What challenges or barriers do UVM faculty face in effectively managing their research data?; and What institutional data management support or services are UVM faculty interested in?

See also: "An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers' Data Management Practices at UVM: Findings from the Qualitative Phase" and "An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers' Data Management Practices at UVM: Findings from the Quantitative Phase."

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

LEARN Toolkit of Best Practice for Research Data Management

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on April 5th, 2017

LEARN has released the LEARN Toolkit of Best Practice for Research Data Management.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

For research performing organisations, this deluge of data presents many challenges in areas such as policy and skills development, training, costs and governance. To help address these issues, today LEARN is publishing the final draft of its Toolkit of Best Practice for Research Data Management.

Digital Curation and Digital Preservation Works | Open Access Works | Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Sitemap

Share

Page 3 of 4112345...102030...Last »

DigitalKoans

DigitalKoans

Digital Scholarship

Copyright © 2005-2017 by Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.