Archive for the 'Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management' Category

Coursera and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Launch MOOC-Based Master’s Degree in Data Science

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on April 5th, 2016

Coursera and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have launched a MOOC-based Master's Degree in Data Science.

Here's an excerpt from the announcement:

Coursera, a leading online education company known for massive open online courses (MOOCs), today announced a professional data science master's degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Home to one of the top five computer science graduate programs in the United States, the University of Illinois will open access to its world-class data science curriculum at a fraction of the cost of a traditional on-campus or online master's degree through the Master of Computer Science in Data Science (MCS-DS) degree on Coursera.

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"Transparency: The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science and Open Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on April 1st, 2016

Liz Lyon has published "Transparency: The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science and Open Data" in LIBER Quarterly.

Here's an excerpt:

This paper presents an exploration of the concept of research transparency. The policy context is described and situated within the broader arena of open science. This is followed by commentary on transparency within the research process, which includes a brief overview of the related concept of reproducibility and the associated elements of research integrity, fraud and retractions. A two-dimensional model or continuum of open science is considered and the paper builds on this foundation by presenting a three-dimensional model, which includes the additional axis of 'transparency'. The concept is further unpacked and preliminary definitions of key terms are introduced: transparency, transparency action, transparency agent and transparency tool.

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"Migrating 2 and 3D Datasets: Preserving AutoCAD at the Archaeology Data Service"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 31st, 2016

Katie Green, Kieron Niven, and Georgina Field have published "Migrating 2 and 3D Datasets: Preserving AutoCAD at the Archaeology Data Service" in the ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information.

Here's an excerpt:

The lessons learnt during the largescale CAD migration process presented in this paper provide an important insight into the digital preservation component of Research Data Management practice.

While the overall migration process presented in this paper was not a strict migration according to the OAIS model and in many cases essentially involved "re-archiving" data, the exercise itself was necessary for the long-term preservation of the data and was undertaken in such a way as to achieve the best possible outcome for both the ADS and data consumers. While elements of the process were both laborious and time consuming (and therefore costly), as a result of having to reassess original files in the SIP, this highlights the benefits of normalizing data at the point of ingest and the production of homogenous AIPs to stable, reliable standards and formats, reaffirming the importance of professional Research Data Management and preservation practices.

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"Making Sense of Researcher Services"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 28th, 2016

Justin Shanks and Kenning Arlitsch have published "Making Sense of Researcher Services" in the Journal of Library Administration.

Here's an excerpt:

In this article we establish three categories (author/researcher identification, academic/professional networking, and reference/citation management) and examine nineteen services that fit into those categories.

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"Dissertations and Data"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) on March 24th, 2016

Joachim Schöpfel et al. have self-archived "Dissertations and Data."

Here's an excerpt:

The keynote provides an overview on the field of research data produced by PhD students, in the context of open science, open access to research results, e-Science and the handling of electronic theses and dissertations. The keynote includes recent empirical results and recommendations for good practice and further research. In particular, the paper is based on an assessment of 864 print and electronic dissertations in sciences, social sciences and humanities from the Universities of Lille (France) and Ljubljana (Slovenia), submitted between 1987 and 2015, and on a survey on data management with 270 scientists in social sciences and humanities of the University of Lille

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"Fostering Open Science Practice through Recognising and Rewarding Research Data Management and Curation Skills"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science on March 23rd, 2016

Joy Davidson has self-archived "Fostering Open Science Practice through Recognising and Rewarding Research Data Management and Curation Skills."

Here's an excerpt:

Researchers will need to acquire new research data management and curation skills that enable them to undertake a broader range of tasks along the entire research lifecycle—from undertaking new means of collaboration, to implementing data management and sharing strategies, to understanding how to amplify and monitor research outputs and to assess their value and impact. In parallel, information professionals who work to support researchers and the open science process will also need to expand their research data management and curation skillsets. It will be equally important that current recognition and reward systems are amended to reflect the application of such skillsets within a range of disciplines. This paper will explore the potential role that librarians can play in supporting and progressing open science and discuss some of the new skills that librarians may require if they are to fulfil this role effectively.

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"The FAIR Guiding Principles for Scientific Data Management and Stewardship"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Science, Publishing on March 17th, 2016

Mark D. Wilkinson et al. have published "The FAIR Guiding Principles for Scientific Data Management and Stewardship" in Scientific Data.

Here's an excerpt:

A diverse set of stakeholders-representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers-have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measurable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings.

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"A New Approach to Configuration Management for Private LOCKSS Networks"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management on March 16th, 2016

Tobin M. Cataldo has published "A New Approach to Configuration Management for Private LOCKSS Networks" in D-Lib Magazine.

Here's an excerpt:

The node-based configuration management model is an alternative approach to configuration management for Private LOCKSS Networks that reduces external dependencies and subsequent vulnerabilities by flattening the hierarchical vendor-consumer model into a preservation node-based service. The node-based configuration management model also describes approaches for leveraging the LOCKSS preservation protocols to distribute and preserve the configuration data, and maintain continuous service regardless of network membership changes or infrastructural failure.

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"Humanities Data in the Library: Integrity, Form, Access"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation, Digital Humanities on March 16th, 2016

Thomas Padilla has published "Humanities Data in the Library: Integrity, Form, Access" in D-Lib Magazine.

Here's an excerpt:

Digitally inflected Humanities scholarship and pedagogy is on the rise. Librarians are engaging this activity in part through a range of digital scholarship initiatives. While these engagements bear value, efforts to reshape library collections in light of demand remain nascent. This paper advances principles derived from practice to inform development of collections that can better support data driven research and pedagogy, examines existing practice in this area for strengths and weaknesses, and extends to consider possible futures.

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"The RADAR Project-A Service for Research Data Archival and Publication"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Curation & Digital Preservation on March 14th, 2016

Angelina Kraft et al. have published "The RADAR Project-A Service for Research Data Archival and Publication" in the ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information.

Here's an excerpt:

The aim of the RADAR (Research Data Repository) project is to set up and establish an infrastructure that facilitates research data management: the infrastructure will allow researchers to store, manage, annotate, cite, curate, search and find scientific data in a digital platform available at any time that can be used by multiple (specialized) disciplines. While appropriate and innovative preservation strategies and systems are in place for the big data communities (e.g., environmental sciences, space, and climate), the stewardship for many other disciplines, often called the "long tail research domains", is uncertain. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the RADAR collaboration project develops a service oriented infrastructure for the preservation, publication and traceability of (independent) research data. The key aspect of RADAR is the implementation of a two-stage business model for data preservation and publication: clients may preserve research results for up to 15 years and assign well-graded access rights, or to publish data with a DOI assignment for an unlimited period of time. Potential clients include libraries, research institutions, publishers and open platforms that desire an adaptable digital infrastructure to archive and publish data according to their institutional requirements and workflows.

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"Data Fluidity in DARIAH—Pushing the Agenda Forward"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Digital Humanities on March 11th, 2016

Laurent Romary, Mike Mertens, and Anne Baillot have self-archived "Data Fluidity in DARIAH—Pushing the Agenda Forward."

Here's an excerpt:

This paper provides both an update concerning the setting up of the European DARIAH infrastructure and a series of strong action lines related to the development of a data centred strategy for the humanities in the coming years. In particular we tackle various aspect of data management: data hosting, the setting up of a DARIAH seal of approval, the establishment of a charter between cultural heritage institutions and scholars and finally a specific view on certification mechanisms for data.

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"Making Sense of Journal Research Data Policies"

Posted in Data Curation, Open Data, and Research Data Management, Open Access, Open Science, Publishing, Scholarly Journals on March 8th, 2016

Linda Naughton and David Kernohan have published "Making Sense of Journal Research Data Policies" in Insights: The UKSG Journal.

Here's an excerpt:

This article gives an overview of the findings from the first phase of the Jisc Journal Research Data Policy Registry pilot (JRDPR), which is currently under way. . . . The project undertook an analysis of 250 journal research data policies to assess the feasibility of developing a policy registry to assist researchers and support staff to comply with research data publication requirements. The evidence shows that the current research data policy ecosystem is in critical need of standardization and harmonization if such services are to be built and implemented. To this end, the article proposes the next steps for the project with the objective of ultimately moving towards a modern research infrastructure based on machine-readable policies that support a more open scholarly communications environment.

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